The Lost History of Christianity

The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia--and How It Died

Author: John Philip Jenkins

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 824

“Jenkins is one of America’s top religious scholars.” —Forbes magazine The Lost History of Christianity by Philip Jenkins offers a revolutionary view of the history of the Christian church. Subtitled “The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia—and How It Died,” it explores the extinction of the earliest, most influential Christian churches of China, India, and the Middle East, which held the closest historical links to Jesus and were the dominant expression of Christianity throughout its first millennium. The remarkable true story of the demise of the institution that shaped both Asia and Christianity as we know them today, The Lost History of Christianity is a controversial and important work of religious scholarship that sounds a warning that must be heeded.

The Lost History of Christianity

The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia--And How It Died

Author: Philip Jenkins

Publisher: Lion Hudson Limited

ISBN:

Category: Africa

Page: 322

View: 886

Leading religion scholar Jenkins reveals a vast Christian world to the east of the Roman Empire and explains how the earliest, most influential churches of the East--China, India, the Middle East, and Africa--died.

The Lost Religion of Jesus

Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity

Author: Keith Akers

Publisher: Lantern Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 260

View: 668

Jesus' preaching was first and foremost about simple living, pacifism, and vegetarianism; he never intended to create a new religion separate from Judaism. Moreover, Jesus' radical Jewish ethics, rather than a new theology, distinguished him and his followers from other Jews. It was the earliest followers of Jesus, the Jewish Christians, who understood Jesus better than any of the gentile Christian groups, which are the spiritual ancestors of modern Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox churches. In this detailed and accessible study, Keith Akers uncovers the history of Jewish Christianity from its origins in the Essenes and John the Baptist, through Jesus, until its disappearance into Islamic mysticism sometime in the seventh or eighth century. Akers argues that only by really understanding this mysterious and much misunderstood strand of early Christianity can we get to the heart of the radical message of Jesus of Nazareth.

Lost Christianities

The Battles for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew

Author: Bart D. Ehrman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Bibles

Page: 294

View: 475

An intriguing look at the early history of the Christian Church provides a study of these ancient forms of Christianity and how they came to be suppressed, reformed, or forgotten, discussing their key texts, theological beliefs, conflict with orthodoxy, historical development, and more. History Dual Main. (Religion--Christianity)

Introducing World Christianity

Author: Charles E. Farhadian

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 244

"This is an engaging multidisciplinary introduction to the worldwide spread and impact of Christianity. Bringing together chapters from leading scholars in history, sociology, anthropology, and religious studies, this book examines the major transformations in contemporary societies brought about through the influence of Christianity. Each chapter shows how the broad themes within Christianity have been adopted and adapted by Christian demoninations within each major region of the world. So, the book paints a global picture of the impact of Christianity, enriched by detailed historic and ethnographic material for each particular region. Throughout, the chapters examine Protestant, Evangelical, Catholic and Orthodox forms of Christianity. However, the approach is non-theological, focusing on the impact of and response to Christianity, rather than questions of faith. The combination of broader perspectives and deep analysis of particular regions, illuminating the social, cultural, political, and religious features of changes brought about by Christianity, makes this book essential reading for students of world Christianity"--

The Lost History of the Canine Race

Our 15,000-year Love Affair with Dogs

Author: Mary Elizabeth Thurston

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Pub

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 301

View: 778

Traces the history of the dog from pre-Columbian North America and ancient Egypt and Rome through Europe's feudal age and England's Victorian era to today

Birth of Christianity

Author: John Dominic Crossan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 653

View: 703

John Dominic Crossan explores the lost years of earliest Christianity, the years immediately following Jesus' execution. He establishes the contextual setting through a combination of literary, anthropological, historical and archaeological approaches. He challenges the assumptions about the role of Paul and the meaning of resurrection, and forges a new understanding of the birth of the Christian church. Here is a vivid account of early Christianity's interaction with the world around it, and of the new traditions and communities established as Jesus' companions continued their movement after his death.

The Lost Soul of American Protestantism

Author: D. G. Hart

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 195

View: 765

In The Lost Soul of American Protestantism, D. G. Hart examines the historical origins of the idea that faith must be socially useful in order to be valuable. Through specific episodes in Presbyterian, Lutheran, and Reformed history, Hart presents a neglected form of Protestantism—confessionalism—as an alternative to prevailing religious theory. He deftly argues that the history of confessional Protestantism is vitally important to current discussions on the role of religion in American life, as it is more concerned with the prosperity of the community of believers than with the spiritual health of the nation as a whole. Hart suggests that, contrary to the legacy of revivalism, faith may be most vital and influential when it is not practical.

The Great and Holy War

How World War I Became a Religious Crusade

Author: Philip Jenkins

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 763

The Great and Holy War offers the first look at how religion created and prolonged the First World War. At the one-hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the war, historian Philip Jenkins reveals the powerful religious dimensions of this modern-day crusade, a period that marked a traumatic crisis for Western civilization, with effects that echoed throughout the rest of the twentieth century. The war was fought by the world's leading Christian nations, who presented the conflict as a holy war. Thanks to the emergence of modern media, a steady stream of patriotic and militaristic rhetoric was given to an unprecedented audience, using language that spoke of holy war and crusade, of apocalypse and Armageddon. But this rhetoric was not mere state propaganda. Jenkins reveals how the widespread belief in angels and apparitions, visions and the supernatural was a driving force throughout the war and shaped all three of the major religions—Christianity, Judaism and Islam—paving the way for modern views of religion and violence. The disappointed hopes and moral compromises that followed the war also shaped the political climate of the rest of the century, giving rise to such phenomena as Nazism, totalitarianism, and communism. Connecting numerous remarkable incidents and characters—from Karl Barth to Carl Jung, the Christmas Truce to the Armenian Genocide—Jenkins creates a powerful and persuasive narrative that brings together global politics, history, and spiritual crisis as never before and shows how religion informed and motivated circumstances on all sides of the war.