The Long-Winded Lady

Notes from The New Yorker

Author: Maeve Brennan

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 284

View: 596

Discover a vivid, atmospheric portrait of mid-century Manhattan with this collection of “Talk of the Town” pieces from the pages of The New Yorker. During the 1950s and 1960s, Maeve Brennan contributed numerous vignettes to the New Yorker’s ”Talk of the Town” department, under the pen name “The Long-Winded Lady.” Her unforgettable sketches—prose snapshots of life in small restaurants, cheap hotels, and the crowded streets of Times Square and the Village—together form a timeless, bittersweet tribute to what she called the “most reckless, most ambitious, most confused, most comical, the saddest and coldest, and most human of cities.” “Of all the incomparable stable of journalists who wrote for The New Yorker during its glory days in the Fifties and Sixties . . . the most distinctive was Irish-born Maeve Brennan. Her keen-eyed observation of the minutiae of New York life has been compared to Turgenev, but a closer parallel is Edward Hopper. . . . Anyone familiar with New York will enjoy a transporting jolt of recognition from these pages. Looking back from our own time, when it seems that every column has to be loaded with hectoring opinion and egotistical preening, Brennan’s stylish scrutiny of minor embarrassments and small pleasures is as welcome as a Dry Martini.” —The Independent

Edward Albee

A Casebook

Author: Bruce Mann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 164

View: 840

From the "angry young man" who wrote Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in 1962, determined to expose the emptiness of American experience to Tiny Alice which reveals his indebtedness to Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco's Theatre of the Absurd, Edward Albee's varied work makes it difficult to label him precisely. Bruce Mann and his contributors approach Albee as an innovator in theatrical form, filling a critical gap in theatrical scholarship.

Albee in Performance

Author: Rakesh Herald Solomon

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 303

View: 629

One of America's premiere playwrights, Edward Albee is also a gifted director. Albee in Performance details Albee's directorial vision and how that vision animates his plays. Having had extraordinary access to Albee as director, Rakesh H. Solomon reveals how Albee has shaped his plays in performance, the attention he pays to each aspect of theater, and how his conception of the key plays he has directed has evolved over a five-decade career. Solomon pays careful attention to the major works from The American Dream and Zoo Story to Albee's best-known work, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, to later plays such as Marriage Play and Three Tall Women. The book also includes interviews with Albee and his collaborators on all aspects of staging, from rehearsal to performance.

Edward Albee

The Poet of Loss

Author: Anita Stenz

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 157

View: 655

The Cambridge Companion to Edward Albee

Author: Stephen Bottoms

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 263

View: 187

Edward Albee, perhaps best known for his acclaimed and infamous 1960s drama Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, is one of America's greatest living playwrights. Now in his seventies, he is still writing challenging, award-winning dramas. This collection of essays on Albee, which includes contributions from the leading commentators on Albee's work, brings fresh critical insights to bear by exploring the full scope of the playwright's career, from his 1959 breakthrough with The Zoo Story to his recent Broadway success, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? (2002). The contributors include scholars of both theatre and English literature, and the essays thus consider the plays both as literary texts and as performed drama. The collection considers a number of Albee's lesser-known and neglected works, provides a comprehensive introduction and overview, and includes an exclusive, original interview with Mr Albee, on topics spanning his whole career.

Maeve Brennan: Homesick at the New Yorker

Author: Angela Bourke

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 360

View: 258

To be a staff writer at The New Yorker during its heyday of the 1950s and 1960s was to occupy one of the most coveted--and influential--seats in American culture. Witty, beautiful, and Irish-born Maeve Brennan was lured to such a position in 1948 and proceeded to dazzle everyone who met her, both in person and on the page. From 1954 to 1981 under the pseudonym "The Long-Winded Lady,” Brennan wrote matchless urban sketches of life in Times Square and the Village for the "Talk of the Town” column, and under her own name published fierce, intimate fiction--tales of childhood, marriage, exile, longing, and the unforgiving side of the Irish temper. Yet even with her elegance and brilliance, Brennan’s rise to genius was as extreme as her collapse: at the time of her death in 1993, Maeve Brennan had not published a word since the 1970s and had slowly slipped into madness, ending up homeless on the same streets of Manhattan that had built her career. It is Angela Bourke’s achievement with Maeve Brennan: Homesick at The New Yorker to bring much-deserved attention to Brennan’s complex legacy in all her triumph and tragedy--from Dublin childhood to Manhattan glamour, and from extraordinary literary achievement to tragic destitution. With this definitive biography of this troubled genius, it is clear that Brennan, though always an outsider in her own life and times, is rightfully recognized as one of the best writers to ever grace the pages of The New Yorker.

American Writers

Author: Leonard Unger

Publisher: Charles Scribners & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 624

View: 343

Shouting Won't Help

Why I--and 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You

Author: Katherine Bouton

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 288

View: 260

For twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. An editor at The New York Times, at daily editorial meetings she couldn't hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was "the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century." Audiologists agree that we're experiencing a national epidemic of hearing impairment. At present, 50 million Americans suffer some degree of hearing loss—17 percent of the population. And hearing loss is not exclusively a product of growing old. The usual onset is between the ages of nineteen and forty-four, and in many cases the cause is unknown. Shouting Won't Help is a deftly written, deeply felt look at a widespread and misunderstood phenomenon. In the style of Jerome Groopman and Atul Gawande, and using her experience as a guide, Bouton examines the problem personally, psychologically, and physiologically. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, and neurobiologists, and with a variety of people afflicted with midlife hearing loss, braiding their stories with her own to illuminate the startling effects of the condition. The result is a surprisingly engaging account of what it's like to live with an invisible disability—and a robust prescription for our nation's increasing problem with deafness. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

Edward Albee

the poet of loss

Author: Anita Maria Stenz

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 182

View: 498

Edward Albee

A Research and Production Sourcebook

Author: Barbara Lee Horn

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 325

View: 997

Traces the entire career of the influential and controversial playwright Edward Albee.