The Linguistics of British Sign Language

An Introduction

Author: Rachel Sutton-Spence

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 299

View: 423

This is the first textbook dealing specifically with British sign linguistics. It provides essential support for learners of British Sign Language and others interested in the structure and use of BSL, and assumes no previous knowledge of linguistics and sign language. Technical terms and linguistic jargon are kept to a minimum. The book contains over three hundred illustrations and an index of signs and sign phrases. There are also exercises and a reading list for further independent study.

The Linguistics of British Sign Language

An Introduction

Author: Rachel Sutton-Spence

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 316

View: 870

This is the first textbook dealing specifically with British sign linguistics. It provides essential support for learners of British Sign Language and others interested in the structure and use of BSL, and assumes no previous knowledge of linguistics and sign language. Technical terms and linguistic jargon are kept to a minimum. The book contains over three hundred illustrations and an index of signs and sign phrases. There are also exercises and a reading list for further independent study.

The Linguistics of British Sign Language

An Introduction

Author: Rachel Sutton-Spence

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 299

View: 888

This is the first textbook dealing specifically with British sign linguistics. It provides essential support for learners of British Sign Language and others interested in the structure and use of BSL, and assumes no previous knowledge of linguistics and sign language. Technical terms and linguistic jargon are kept to a minimum. The book contains over three hundred illustrations and an index of signs and sign phrases. There are also exercises and a reading list for further independent study.

British Sign Language

Author: Margaret Deuchar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 248

View: 850

This first linguistic study of British Sign Language is written for students of linguistics, for deaf and hearing sign language researchers, for teachers and social workers for the deaf. The author cross-refers to American Sign Language, which has usually been more extensively studied by linguists, and compares the two languages.

The Sociolinguistics of Sign Languages

Author: Ceil Lucas

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 259

View: 547

An accessible introduction to the major areas of sociolinguistics as they relate to sign languages and deaf communities.

Analysing Sign Language Poetry

Author: R. Sutton-Spence

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 265

View: 233

This new study is a major contribution to sign language study and to literature generally, looking at the complex grammatical, phonological and morphological systems of sign language linguistic structure and their role in sign language poetry and performance. Chapters deal with repetition and rhyme, symmetry and balance, neologisms, ambiguity, themes, metaphor and allusion, poem and performance, and blending English and sign language poetry. Major poetic performances in both BSL and ASL - with emphasis on the work of the deaf poet Dorothy Miles - are analysed using the tools provided in the book.

Dictionary of British Sign Language/English

Author: David Brien

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: British Sign Language

Page: 1084

View: 228

British Sign Language (B.S.L.) is the visual gestural language of the Deaf community in Britain and is the first or preferred language of over 70,000 people. This is the first major B.S.L./English Dictionary to be published. It contains over 1,800 photographed sign entries ordered by linguistic principles according to the visual characteristics of the language. Each entry is notated with a description of how to produce the sign. A guide to the meaning(s) of each sign is provided in English. The dictionary will be of particular interest to hearing and Deaf people (and their tutors) engaged in learning B.S.L. or English as a second language. Whether you want to learn B.S.L or teach it - or just improve your vocabulary - the Dictionary of British Sign Language is the authoritative place to begin. The Dictionary of British Sign Language was compiled for the British Deaf Association by the Deaf Studies Research Unit at the University of Durham.

Nonmanuals in Sign Language

Author: Annika Herrmann

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 197

View: 683

In addition to the hands, sign languages make extensive use of nonmanual articulators such as the body, head, and face to convey linguistic information. This collected volume focuses on the forms and functions of nonmanuals in sign languages. The articles discuss various aspects of specific nonmanual markers in different sign languages and enhance the fact that nonmanuals are an essential part of sign language grammar. Approaching the topic from empirical, theoretical, and computational perspectives, the book is of special interest to sign language researchers, typologists, and theoretical as well as computational linguists that are curious about language and modality. The articles investigate phenomena such as mouth gestures, agreement, negation, topicalization, and semantic operators, and discuss general topics such as language and modality, simultaneity, computer animation, and the interfaces between syntax, semantics, and prosody.Originally published in Sign Language & Linguistics 14:1 (2011)

Theology without Words

Theology in the Deaf Community

Author: Dr Wayne Morris

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 182

This book is a study of a Christian theology without words, focussing on theology in the Deaf Community. Deaf people's first and preferred method of communication is not English or any other spoken language, but British Sign Language - a language that cannot be written down. Deaf people of faith attend church on a regular basis, profess faith in God and have developed unique approaches to doing theology. While most Western theology is word-centred and is either expressed through or dependent on written texts, theology in the Deaf Community is largely non-written. This book presents and examines some of that theology from the Deaf Community and argues that written texts are not necessary for creative theological debate, a deep spirituality or for ideas about God to develop.