The Life and Death of St. Kilda

The Moving Story of a Vanished Island Community

Author: Tom Steel

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN:

Category: Saint Kilda (Scotland)

Page: 314

View: 170

Situated at the westernmost point of the United Kingdom, the spectacularly beautiful but utterly bleak island of St Kilda is familiar to virtually nobody. A lonely archipelago off the coast of Scotland, it is hard to believe that for over two thousand years, men and women lived here, cut off from the rest of the world. With a population never exceeding two hundred in its history, the St Kildans were fiercely self-sufficient. An intensely religious people, they climbed cliffs from childhood and caught birds for food. Their sense of community was unparalleled and isolation enveloped their day-to-day existence. With the onset of the First World War, things changed. For the very first time in St Kilda's history, daily communication was established between the islanders and the mainland. Slowly but surely, this marked the beginning of the end of St Kilda and in August 1930, the island's remaining 36 inhabitants were evacuated. In this fascinating book, Tom Steel tells the moving story of this vanished community and how twentieth century civilization ultimately brought an entire way of life to its knees.

Steamships to St Kilda

John McCallum, Martin Orme, and the Life and Death of an Island Community

Author: Donald E. Meek

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Saint Kilda (Scoltand)

Page: 40

View: 157

Cultural Studies

Volume 4

Author: Lawrence Grossberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 96

View: 664

First published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Land and People

Papers in Memory of John G. Evans

Author: Michael J. Allen

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 117

This volume is derived, in concept, from a conference held in honour of John Evans by the School of History and Archaeology and The Prehistoric Society at Cardiff University in March 2006. It brings together papers that address themes and landscapes on a variety of levels. They cover geographical, methodological and thematic areas that were of interest to, and had been studied by, John Evans. The volume is divided into five sections, which echo themes of importance in British prehistory. They include papers on aspects of environmental archaeology, experiments and philosophy; new research on the nature of woodland on the chalklands of southern England; coasts and islands; people, process and social order, and snails and shells - a strong part of John Evans' career. This volume presents a range of papers examining people's interaction with the landscape in all its forms. The papers provide a diverse but cohesive picture of how archaeological landscapes are viewed within current research frameworks and approaches, while also paying tribute to the innovative and inspirational work of one of the leading protagonists of environmental archaeology and the holistic approach to landscape interpretation.

Night Waking

Author: Sarah Moss

Publisher: Granta Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 808

Historian Anna Bennett has a book to write. She also has an insomniac toddler, a precocious, death-obsessed seven-year-old, and a frequently absent ecologist husband who has brought them all to Colsay, a desolate island in the Hebrides, so he can count the puffins. Ferociously sleep-deprived, torn between mothering and her desire for the pleasures of work and solitude, Anna becomes haunted by the discovery of a baby's skeleton in the garden of their house. Her narrative is punctuated by letters home, written 200 years before, by May, a young, middle-class midwife desperately trying to introduce modern medicine to the suspicious, insular islanders. The lives of these two characters intersect unexpectedly in this deeply moving but also at times blackly funny story about maternal ambivalence, the way we try to control children, and about women's vexed and passionate relationship with work. Moss's second novel displays an exciting expansion of her range - showing her to be both an excellent comic writer and a novelist of great emotional depth.

Demarketing

Author: Nigel Bradley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 172

We all understand the basic principles underpinning marketing activity: to identify unfulfilled needs and desires and boost demand for the solutions a product is offering. The mantra is always "sell more". De-marketing tries for the very opposite. Why would a company actively try to decrease demand? There are many good reasons to do so: a firm cannot supply large enough quantities, or wants to limit supply to a region of narrow profit margin. Or, crucially, to discourage undesirable customers: those that could be bad for brand reputation, or in the case of the finance sector, high risk. De-marketing can yield effective solutions to these issues, effectively curtailing demand yet (crucially) not destroying it. Nevertheless, the fundamental negativity of de-marketing strategies often causes organisations to hide them from view and, as a result, they are rarely studied. This then is the first book to cast light on the secretive, counterintuitive world of de-marketing, deconstructing its mysteries and demonstrating how to incorporate them into a profit-driven marketing plan. A selection of thought leaders in strategic marketing mix theory with illustrative global cases, providing insight into how these strategies have been employed in practice and measuring their successes and failures. It’s a must-read for any student or researcher that wants to think differently about marketing.

100 Days of Hope and Fear

How Scotland's Referendum was Lost and Won

Author: David Torrance

Publisher: Luath Press Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 847

Was it simply a victory for fear over hope? How did the Better Together campaign come so close to losing it? How did the Yes campaign come so close to winning it? What can the people of Scotland - and other aspirant nations - learn from this seismic democratic event? Scotland’s independence referendum on 18 September 2014 was the most significant ballot in Scotland’s history. The 100 days up to 18 September was the official campaign period and the world’s media was watching. David Torrance was there throughout, in front of the cameras, on the radio, in the newspapers, at the debates and gatherings, privy to some of the behind-the-scenes manoeuvrings. A passionate federalist at heart, described disparagingly by the outgoing First Minister as ‘Tory-leaning’, Torrance made a valiant attempt to remain ‘professionally neutral’ throughout. His commentary and analysis as the campaign went through its many twists and turns was always insightful, if not always popular. 'Reading this diary back during the editing process it was clear that, like (Nate) Silver (the US polling guru whose view was that the Yes campaign had virtually no chance of victory), I got a lot of things wrong (including the likely margin of victory) but also many things broadly correct. At least I can plead, as journalists often do, that I was probably right at the time.' His diary is deliciously gossipy, entertainingly indiscreet, and a must-read for political geeks as well as those who want to see what goes on behind the scenes of Scotland's politics and media. STEPHEN DAISLEY, STV David Torrance has emerged as one of the campaign's most important commentators... [his] unauthorised biography of Alex Salmond, Against the Odds, has become the prescribed text for the flying columns of English-based and overseas journalists converging on Scotland in this our hour of destiny. KEVIN McKENNA, Scottish Review of Books Torrance has secured himself a prominent position in the referendum debate, partly through the strategic use of nice jumpers and expertly crafted hair, but largely on merit … [he deserves] far better than the lazy impossibilist critiques to which [his federalist] proposals have been subjected. RORY SCOTHORNE on Britain Rebooted F*** sake... David Torrance on again. Is the greasy weasel never aff the telly? CALUM FINDLAY [on Twitter]