The Jemima Code

Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks

Author: Toni Tipton-Martin

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 264

View: 226

Women of African descent have contributed to America’s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate “Aunt Jemima” who cooked mostly by natural instinct. To discover the true role of black women in the creation of American, and especially southern, cuisine, Toni Tipton-Martin has spent years amassing one of the world’s largest private collections of cookbooks published by African American authors, looking for evidence of their impact on American food, families, and communities and for ways we might use that knowledge to inspire community wellness of every kind. The Jemima Code presents more than 150 black cookbooks that range from a rare 1827 house servant’s manual, the first book published by an African American in the trade, to modern classics by authors such as Edna Lewis and Vertamae Grosvenor. The books are arranged chronologically and illustrated with photos of their covers; many also display selected interior pages, including recipes. Tipton-Martin provides notes on the authors and their contributions and the significance of each book, while her chapter introductions summarize the cultural history reflected in the books that follow. These cookbooks offer firsthand evidence that African Americans cooked creative masterpieces from meager provisions, educated young chefs, operated food businesses, and nourished the African American community through the long struggle for human rights. The Jemima Code transforms America’s most maligned kitchen servant into an inspirational and powerful model of culinary wisdom and cultural authority.

Jubilee

Recipes from Two Centuries of African-American Cooking

Author: Toni Tipton Martin

Publisher: Clarkson Potter

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 304

View: 573

Adapted from historical texts and rare African-American cookbooks, the 125 recipes of Jubilee paint a rich, varied picture of the true history of African-American cooking: a cuisine far beyond soul food. Toni Tipton-Martin, the first African-American food editor of a daily American newspaper, is the author of the James Beard Award-winning The Jemima Code, a history of African-American cooking found in--and between--the lines of three centuries' worth of African-American cookbooks. Tipton-Martin builds on that research in Jubilee, adapting recipes from those historic texts for the modern kitchen. What we find is a world of African-American cuisine--made by enslaved master chefs, free caterers, and black entrepreneurs and culinary stars--that goes far beyond soul food. It's a cuisine that was developed in the homes of the elite and middle class; that takes inspiration from around the globe; that is a diverse, varied style of cooking that has created much of what we know of as American cuisine.

Getting What We Need Ourselves

How Food Has Shaped African American Life

Author: Jennifer Jensen Wallach, author of How America Eats: A Social History of US Food and Culture

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 854

This multi-generational story begins before the transatlantic slave trade in West Africa and ends with a discussion of contemporary African American vegans. Demonstrating that food has been both a tool of empowerment and a weapon of white supremacy, this study documents the symbolic power of food alongside an ongoing struggle for food access.

Best Food Writing 2016

Author: Holly Hughes

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 384

View: 263

Like your favorite local grocery store, with its sushi bar, fresh baked goods, and maybe a very obliging butcher, Best Food Writing offers a bounty of everything in one place. For seventeen years, Holly Hughes has delved into piles of magazines and newspapers, scanned endless websites and blogs, and foraged through bookstores to provide a robust mix of what's up in the world of food writing. From the year's hottest trends (this year: meal kits and extreme dining) to the realities of everyday meals and home cooks (with kids, without; special occasions and every day) to highlighting those chefs whose magic is best spun in their own kitchens, these essays once again skillfully, deliciously evoke what's on our minds-and our plates. Pull up a chair. Contributors include: Betsy Andrews Jessica Battilana John Birdsall Matt Buchanan Jennifer Cockrall-King Tove Danovich Laura Donohue Daniel Duane Victoria Pesce Elliott Edward Frame Phyllis Grant Andrew Sean Greer Kathy Gunst L. Kasimu Harris Steve Hoffman Dianne Jacob Rowan Jacobsen Pableaux Johnson Howie Kahn Mikki Kendall Brian Kevin Kat Kinsman Todd Kliman Julia Kramer Corby Kummer Francis Lam Rachel Levin Brett Martin Tim Neville Chris Newens James Nolan Keith Pandolfi Carol Penn-Romine Michael Procopio Kathleen Purvis Alice Randall Besha Rodell Helen Rosner Michael Ruhlman Oliver Sacks Andrea Strong Jason Tesauro Toni Tipton-Martin Wells Tower Luke Tsai Max Ufberg Debbie Weingarten Pete Wells

Recipes for Respect

African American Meals and Meaning

Author: Rafia Zafar

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 148

View: 278

Food studies, once trendy, has settled into the public arena. In the academy, scholarship on food and literary culture constitutes a growing river within literary and cultural studies, but writing on African American food and dining remains a tributary. Recipes for Respect bridges this gap, illuminating the role of foodways in African American culture as well as the contributions of Black cooks and chefs to what has been considered the mainstream. Beginning in the early nineteenth century and continuing nearly to the present day, African Americans have often been stereotyped as illiterate kitchen geniuses. Rafia Zafar addresses this error, highlighting the long history of accomplished African Americans within our culinary traditions, as well as the literary and entrepreneurial strategies for civil rights and respectability woven into the written records of dining, cooking, and serving. Whether revealed in cookbooks or fiction, memoirs or hotel-keeping manuals, agricultural extension bulletins or library collections, foodways knowledge sustained Black strategies for self-reliance and dignity, the preservation of historical memory, and civil rights and social mobility. If, to follow Mary Douglas’s dictum, food is a field of action—that is, a venue for social intimacy, exchange, or aggression—African American writing about foodways constitutes an underappreciated critique of the racialized social and intellectual spaces of the United States.

The Red Rooster Cookbook

Author: Marcus Samuelsson

Publisher: Pavilion Books

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 384

View: 675

Publication coincides with the opening of Samuelsson's first international outpost of Red Rooster in Shoreditch, London, May 2017 Ever since the 1930s, Harlem has been a magnet for more than a million African Americans, a melting pot for Spanish, African, and Caribbean immigrants, and a mecca for artists. When Chef Marcus Samuelsson opened Red Rooster on Harlem’s Lenox Avenue, he envisioned so much more than just a restaurant. He wanted to create a gathering place at the heart of his adopted neighbourhood, where both the uptown and downtown sets could see and be seen, mingle and meet – and so he did, in a big way. The Red Rooster Cookbook is much more than a collection of recipes. It’s a love letter to Harlem shown through the people, music, soul, and food. Marcus’ Ethiopian and Swedish upbringing converge with his Harlem-American present to give readers a culinary clash of dishes to try, all mirroring the menus at his much loved neighbourhood restaurant Red Rooster. Recipes range from the restaurant’s Deviled Eggs with Chicken Skin Mayo, Obama Fried Ribs, Whole Fried Fish with Grits, Curried Goat Stew, Sunday Tomato Eggs, and Uncle T’s Meatballs. He reinvents traditional home comfort foods like macaroni cheese and Swedish meatballs with exciting twists and new flavour combinations, placing them centre stage at the dinner table. Marcus dedicates the book, “To the people of Harlem, especially the generation before mine who cared, restored and fought for uptown, to make sure Harlem would be a special neighbourhood in the greatest city – a place I am lucky to call home.” Full of heritage and culture, music and love, this is far more than just a cookbook.

Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage

Two Hundred Years of Southern Cuisine and Culture

Author: John van Willigen

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 306

View: 694

Food is a significant part of our daily lives and can be one of the most telling records of a time and place. Our meals -- from what we eat, to how we prepare it, to how we consume it -- illuminate our culture and history. As a result, cookbooks present a unique opportunity to analyze changing foodways and can yield surprising discoveries about society's tastes and priorities. In Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage, John van Willigen explores the state's history through its changing food culture, beginning with Lettice Bryan's The Kentucky Housewife (originally published in 1839). Considered one of the earliest regional cookbooks, The Kentucky Housewife includes pre--Civil War recipes intended for use by a household staff instead of an individual cook, along with instructions for serving the family. Van Willigen also shares the story of the original Aunt Jemima -- the advertising persona of Nancy Green, born in Montgomery County, Kentucky -- who was one of many African American voices in Kentucky culinary history. Kentucky's Cookbook Heritage is a journey through the history of the commonwealth, showcasing the shifting priorities and innovations of the times. Analyzing the historical importance of a wide range of publications, from the nonprofit and charity cookbooks that flourished at the end of the twentieth century to the contemporary cookbook that emphasizes local ingredients, van Willigen provides a valuable perspective on the state's social history.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 2182

View: 720

The second edition of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, originally published in September 2004, covers the significant events, inventions, and social movements that have shaped the way Americans view, prepare, and consume food and drink. Entries range across historical periods and the trends that characterize them. The thoroughly updated new edition captures the shifting American perspective on food and is the most authoritative and the most current reference work on American cuisine.

How America Eats

A Social History of U.S. Food and Culture

Author: Jennifer Jensen Wallach

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 243

In How America Eats, Food historian Jennifer Wallach examines how Americans have produced food, cooked, and filled their stomachs from the colonial era to the present. Due to the complex history of conquest, enslavement, and immigration, the United States has never developed a singular cohesive culinary tradition. U.S. food practices have been shaped by the various groups that have called a certain geographical space home. However, more than fusion and friction between different racial and ethnic groups went into creating American foodways. Wallach demonstrates that technological innovations and ideas about industrialism and progress have also impacted what and how Americans eat. Moreover, the American diet is the product of more amorphous factors, the outgrowth of both shared and competing values. The history of food in America reveals changing and contradictory ideas about subjects including nationality, race, technological innovation, gender, politics, religion, and patriotism.