The Japanese Film

Art and Industry - Expanded Edition

Author: Joseph L. Anderson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 183

Tracing the development of the Japanese cinema from 1896 (when the first Kinetoscope was imported) through the golden ages of film in Japan up to today, this work reveals the once flourishing film industry and the continuing unique art of the Japanese film. Now back in print with updated sections, major revaluations, a comprehensive international bibliography, and an exceptional collection of 168 stills ranging over eight decades, this book remains the unchallenged reference for all who seek a broad understanding of the aesthetic, historical, and economic elements of motion pictures from Japan.

A Hundred Years of Japanese Film

A Concise History, with a Selective Guide to DVDs and Videos

Author: Donald Richie

Publisher: Kodansha International

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 317

View: 961

Donald Richie is one of the foremost authorities on Japanese cinema, and has produced several classic works, including books on the world- renowned directors Kurosawa and Ozu. Richie here offers a highly readable insider's look at the achievements of Japanese filmmakers. Donald Richie is one of the foremost authorities on Japanese cinema, and has produced several classic works, including books on the world-renowned directors Kurosawa and Ozu. Richie here offers a highly readable insider's look at the achievements of Japanese filmmakers. He begins in the late 1800s,

Historical Dictionary of Japanese Cinema

Author: Jasper Sharp

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 564

View: 446

The cinema of Japan predates that of Russia, China, and India, and it has been able to sustain itself without outside assistance for over a century. Japanese cinema's long history of production and considerable output has seen films made in a variety of genres, including melodramas, romances, gangster movies, samurai movies, musicals, horror films, and monster films. It has also produced some of the most famous names in the history of cinema: Akira Kurosawa, Hayao Miyazaki, Beat Takeshi, Toshirô Mifune, Godzilla, The Ring, Akira, Rashomon, and Seven Samurai. The Historical Dictionary of Japanese Cinema is an introduction to and overview of the long history of Japanese cinema. It aims to provide an entry point for those with little or no familiarity with the subject, while it is organized so that scholars in the field will also be able to use it to find specific information. This is done through a detailed chronology, an introductory essay, and appendixes of films, film studios, directors, and performers. The cross-referenced dictionary entries cover key films, genres, studios, directors, performers, and other individuals. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Japanese cinema.

A New History of Japanese Cinema

Author: Isolde Standish

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 630

In A New History of Japanese Cinema Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film. She details an industry and an art form shaped by the competing and merging forces of traditional culture and of economic and technological innovation. Adopting a thematic, exploratory approach, Standish links the concept of Japanese cinema as a system of communication with some of the central discourses of the twentieth century: modernism, nationalism, humanism, resistance, and gender. After an introduction outlining the earliest years of cinema in Japan, Standish demonstrates cinema's symbolic position in Japanese society in the 1930s - as both a metaphor and a motor of modernity. Moving into the late thirties and early forties, Standish analyses cinema's relationship with the state-focusing in particular on the war and occupation periods. The book's coverage of the post-occupation period looks at "romance" films in particular. Avant-garde directors came to the fore during the 1960s and early seventies, and their work is discussed in depth. The book concludes with an investigation of genre and gender in mainstream films of recent years. In grappling with Japanese film history and criticism, most western commentators have concentrated on offering interpretations of what have come to be considered "classic" films. A New History of Japanese Cinema takes a genuinely innovative approach to the subject, and should prove an essential resource for many years to come.

The Japanese Movie

An Illustrated History

Author: Donald Richie

Publisher: Tokyo, Japan : Kodansha International

ISBN:

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 200

View: 930

The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Cinema

Author: Daisuke Miyao

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 483

View: 710

This book provides a multifaceted single-volume account of Japanese cinema. It addresses productive debates about what Japanese cinema is, where Japanese cinema is, as well as what and where Japanese cinema studies is, at the so-called period of crisis of national boundary under globalization and the so-called period of crisis of cinema under digitalization.

The Japanese Film

Author: Audio Brandon Films

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 48

View: 132

Archetypes in Japanese Film

The Sociopolitical and Religious Significance of the Principal Heroes and Heroines

Author: Gregory Barrett

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 252

View: 100

This study examines the significance of the archetypal heroes and heroines of Japanese cinema and traces both their prior development in literature, drama, and folklore, and their subsequent variations in popular culture.

Reading a Japanese Film

Cinema in Context

Author: Keiko I. McDonald

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 292

View: 210

Keiko McDonald presents a historical overview and outlines a unified approach to Japanese film theory. She analyses a wide range of work, from familiar classics by Ozu and Kurosawa to the films of a younger generation of directors.

Visions of Japanese Modernity

Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925

Author: Aaron Andrew Gerow

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 323

View: 778

"Visions of Japanese Modernity is the single best account of the formation of Japanese cinema. Deftly drawing on film discourses, regulations, and exhibition practices, it brilliantly brings into focus one of the most exuberant and contested moments in the history of cinema. It not only sets new standards for film history but also plants the seeds for a counterhistory to cinema as such."--Thomas LaMarre, author of The Anime Machine: A Media Theory of Animation "In this landmark study, Aaron Gerow richly demonstrates the vibrancy of Japanese film culture as no book has done before. Visions of Japanese Modernity is centered on the contentious Pure Film Movement, and the transformations it helped provoke in performance, screenwriting, censorship, film style, and benshi oratory. With virtually no extant films to work with, Gerow strategically turns to a multitude of other sources, including fanzines, popular movie magazines, sociological studies, government regulations, and impressive works of early film theory. Rich in detail and lucidly argued, Visions of Modernity provides a model for writing about filmmaking in its social, political and aesthetic contexts."--Abé Mark Nornes, author of Cinema Babel: Translating Global Cinema "Gerow offers not only a benchmark in the study of Japanese cinema, but a major contribution to world film history; a thoroughly researched and complexly argued 'discursive' history of early Japanese cinema, that avoids approaching it simply as an alternative to western cinema and reveals the unique role cinema played in the formulation of modern Japanese culture. Gerow makes clear the foundations of Japanese film history in the silent era--and how it shaped the complex and exciting national cinema that followed."--Tom Gunning, author of D.W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film