The Hunting of the Snark

An Agony, in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: HUMOR

Page: 83

View: 382

This charming book contains an illustrated nonsense poem by author Lewis Carroll.

The Hunting of the Snark

An Agony in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 40

View: 771

The nonsensical poem The Hunting of the Snark (An Agony in Eight Fits) was written by Lewis Carroll in 1874 and published in 1876. Describing "with infinite humor the impossible voyage of an improbable crew to find an inconceivable creature", the work borrows in-part from Carroll's Jabberwocky in Through the Looking-Glass.

The Hunting of the Snark an Agony in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 30

View: 621

This collection of literature attempts to compile many of the classic works that have stood the test of time and offer them at a reduced, affordable price, in an attractive volume so that everyone can enjoy them.

Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark

An Agony, in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English poetry

Page: 42

View: 317

A nonsense poem recounting the adventures of the Bellman and his crew and their challenges hunting a Snark.

The Hunting of the Snark - With the Original High Resolution Illustrations of Henry Holiday

The Impossible Voyage of an Improbable Crew to Find an Inconceivable Creature or an Agony in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 27

View: 305

This carefully crafted ebook: “The Hunting of the Snark - With the Original High Resolution Illustrations of Henry Holiday” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll. Written from 1874 to 1876, the poem borrows the setting, some creatures, and eight portmanteau words from Carroll's earlier poem "Jabberwocky" in his children's novel Through the Looking Glass. The plot follows a crew of ten trying to hunt the Snark, an animal which may turn out to be a highly dangerous Boojum; the only one of the crew to find the Snark quickly vanishes, leading the narrator to explain that it was a Boojum after all. Henry Holiday illustrated the poem, and the poem is dedicated to Gertrude Chataway, whom Carroll met as a young girl at the English seaside town Sandown in the Isle of Wight in 1875. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832 – 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky", all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy.

The Hunting of the Snark (Coycoy)

An Agony in Eight Fits

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 44

View: 345

The nonsensical poem The Hunting of the Snark (An Agony in Eight Fits) was written by Lewis Carroll in 1874 and published in 1876. Describing "with infinite humor the impossible voyage of an improbable crew to find an inconceivable creature", the work borrows in-part from Carroll's Jabberwocky in Through the Looking-Glass.Coycoy brings great works of literature from the past centuries, holding the highest standards and reproduce the text as its earliest readers would have encountered it. Look for more titles in the Coycoy's collection to build your own and best [email protected]

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

The Hunting of the Snark : an Agony in Eight Fits ; Through the Looking-glass, and what Alice Found There ; Rhyme? and Reason? ; Sylvie and Bruno ; Sylvie and Bruno Concluded

Author: Lewis Carroll

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 415

Democracy and Transparency in the Indian State

The Making of the Right to Information Act

Author: Prashant Sharma

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 954

The enactment of the national Right to Information (RTI) Act in 2005 has been produced, consumed, and celebrated as an important event of democratic deepening in India both in terms of the process that led to its enactment (arising from a grassroots movement) and its outcome (fundamentally altering the citizen--state relationship). This book proposes that the explanatory factors underlying this event may be more complex than imagined thus far. The book discusses how the leadership of the grassroots movement was embedded within the ruling elite and possessed the necessary resources as well as unparalleled access to spaces of power for the movement to be successful. It shows how the democratisation of the higher bureaucracy along with the launch of the economic liberalisation project meant that the urban, educated, high-caste, upper-middle class elite that provided critical support to the demand for an RTI Act was no longer vested in the state and had moved to the private sector. Mirroring this shift, the framing of the RTI Act during the 1990s saw its ambit reduced to the government, even as there was a concomitant push to privatise public goods and services. It goes on to investigate the Indian RTI Act within the global explosion of freedom of information laws over the last two decades, and shows how international pressures had a direct and causal impact both on its content and the timing of its enactment. Taking the production of the RTI Act as a lens, the book argues that while there is much to celebrate in the consolidation of procedural democracy in India over the last six decades, existing social and political structures may limit the extent and forms of democratic deepening occurring in the near future. It will be of interest to those working in the fields of South Asian Law, Asian Politics, and Civil Society.

The Cinema of Steven Spielberg

Empire of Light

Author: Nigel Morris

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 541

Cinema's most successful director is a commercial and cultural force demanding serious consideration. Not just triumphant marketing, this international popularity is partly a function of the movies themselves. Polarised critical attitudes largely overlook this, and evidence either unquestioning adulation or vilification often vitriolic for epitomising contemporary Hollywood. Detailed textual analyses reveal that alongside conventional commercial appeal, Spielberg's movies function consistently as a self-reflexive commentary on cinema. Rather than straightforwardly consumed realism or fantasy, they invite divergent readings and self-conscious spectatorship which contradict assumptions about their ideological tendencies. Exercising powerful emotional appeal, their ambiguities are profitably advantageous in maximising audiences and generating media attention.