Lost Car Companies of Detroit

Author: Alan Naldrett

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 144

View: 398

"Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain: Ford, General Motors and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today"--Publisher website.

The Fail Of Automakers

History Of Automakers And Auto Industry: Lost Car Companies Of Detroit

Author: Lonny Cavrak

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 158

View: 478

The car industry is a big industry with high returns and risks. From the beginning, many car companies appeared, but not everyone was successful. But their stories can also be a lesson we can learn from. Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

The End of Detroit

How the Big Three Lost Their Grip on the American Car Market

Author: Micheline Maynard

Publisher: Currency

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 853

An in-depth, hard-hitting account of the mistakes, miscalculations and myopia that have doomed America’s automobile industry. In the 1990s, Detroit’s Big Three automobile companies were riding high. The introduction of the minivan and the SUV had revitalized the industry, and it was widely believed that Detroit had miraculously overcome the threat of foreign imports and regained its ascendant position. As Micheline Maynard makes brilliantly clear in THE END OF DETROIT, however, the traditional American car industry was, in fact, headed for disaster. Maynard argues that by focusing on high-profit trucks and SUVs, the Big Three missed a golden opportunity to win back the American car-buyer. Foreign companies like Toyota and Honda solidified their dominance in family and economy cars, gained market share in high-margin luxury cars, and, in an ironic twist, soon stormed in with their own sophisticatedly engineered and marketed SUVs, pickups and minivans. Detroit, suffering from a “good enough” syndrome and wedded to ineffective marketing gimmicks like rebates and zero-percent financing, failed to give consumers what they really wanted—reliability, the latest technology and good design at a reasonable cost. Drawing on a wide range of interviews with industry leaders, including Toyota’s Fujio Cho, Nissan’s Carlos Ghosn, Chrysler’s Dieter Zetsche, BMW’s Helmut Panke, and GM’s Robert Lutz, as well as car designers, engineers, test drivers and owners, Maynard presents a stark picture of the culture of arrogance and insularity that led American car manufacturers astray. Maynard predicts that, by the end of the decade, one of the American car makers will no longer exist in its present form.

Tales Of Automakers

The Fail Of Automakers And Car Company: Lost Car Companies Of Detroit

Author: Tawnya Ana

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 158

View: 308

The car industry is a big industry with high returns and risks. From the beginning, many car companies appeared, but not everyone was successful. But their stories can also be a lesson we can learn from. Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

Car Industry Of Detroit

The History Of Car Industry And Some Lost Car Company: Steam Powered Auto

Author: Lorilee Soroka

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 158

View: 425

This book tells some tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade.

Horse Trading in the Age of Cars

Men in the Marketplace

Author: Steven M. Gelber

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 675

The trading, selling, and buying of personal transport has changed little over the past one hundred years. Whether horse trading in the early twentieth century or car buying today, haggling over prices has been the common practice of buyers and sellers alike. Horse Trading in the Age of Cars offers a fascinating study of the process of buying an automobile in a historical and gendered context. Steven M. Gelber convincingly demonstrates that the combative and frequently dishonest culture of the showroom floor is a historical artifact whose origins lie in the history of horse trading. Bartering and bargaining were the norm in this predominantly male transaction, with both buyers and sellers staking their reputations and pride on their ability to negotiate the better deal. Gelber comments on this point-of-sale behavior and what it reveals about American men. Gelber's highly readable and lively prose makes clear how this unique economic ritual survived into the industrial twentieth century, in the process adding a colorful and interesting chapter to the history of the automobile.

The Company and the Union

The "civilized Relationship" of the General Motors Corporation and the United Automobile Workers

Author: William Serrin

Publisher: Random House Childrens Books

ISBN:

Category: Industrial relations

Page: 344

View: 297

The Electric Car in America, 1890-1922

A Social History

Author: Kerry Segrave

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 263

View: 216

“Extraordinary…will prove to be an enduringly popular addition to both community and academic library collections…a must read”—Midwest Book Review The electric vehicle seemed poised in 1900 to be a leader in automotive production. Clean, odorless, noiseless and mechanically simple, electrics rarely broke down and were easy to operate. An electric car could be started instantly from the driver’s seat; no other machine could claim that advantage. But then it all went wrong. As this history details, the hope and confidence of 1900 collapsed and just two decades later electric cars were effectively dead. They had remained expensive even as gasoline cars saw dramatic price reductions, and the storage battery was an endless source of problems. An increasingly frantic public relations campaign of lies and deceptive advertising could not turn the tide.