The Henry Miller Reader

Author: Henry Miller

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 397

View: 230

A collection of works spanning the entire career of great 20th-century American writer Henry Miller, edited and introduced by Lawrence Durrell.

21st Century Sociology: A Reference Handbook

Author: Clifton D. Bryant

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1344

View: 967

21st Century Sociology: A Reference Handbook provides a concise forum through which the vast array of knowledge accumulated, particularly during the past three decades, can be organized into a single definitive resource. The two volumes of this Reference Handbook focus on the corpus of knowledge garnered in traditional areas of sociological inquiry, as well as document the general orientation of the newer and currently emerging areas of sociological inquiry.

Fragmenting Modernism

Ford Madox Ford, the Novel, and the Great War

Author: Sara Haslam

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism & Collections

Page: 241

View: 940

This is a study of Ford Maddox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of The English Review, and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But as the grandson of Ford Maddox Brown, and a son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout is that modernism possesses more than one face.

Making in America

From Innovation to Market

Author: Suzanne Berger

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 264

View: 640

America is the world leader in innovation, but many of the innovative ideas that are hatched in American start-ups, labs, and companies end up going abroad to reach commercial scale. Apple, the superstar of innovation, locates its production in China (yet still reaps most of its profits in the United States). When innovation does not find the capital, skills, and expertise it needs to come to market in the United States, what does it mean for economic growth and job creation? Inspired by the MIT Made in America project of the 1980s, Making in America brings experts from across MIT to focus on a critical problem for the country.MIT scientists, engineers, social scientists, and management experts visited more than 250 firms in the United States, Germany, and China. In companies across America -- from big defense contractors to small machine shops and new technology start-ups -- these experts tried to learn how we can rebuild the industrial landscape to sustain an innovative economy. At each stop, they asked this basic question: "When you have a new idea, how do you get it into the market?" They found gaping holes and missing pieces in the industrial ecosystem. Even in an Internet-connected world, proximity to innovation and users matters for industry. Making in America describes ways to strengthen this connection, including public-private collaborations, new government-initiated manufacturing innovation institutes, and industry/community college projects. If we can learn from these ongoing experiments in linking innovation to production, American manufacturing could have a renaissance.

The Great Tradition of Christian Thinking

A Student's Guide

Author: David S. Dockery

Publisher: Crossway

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 128

View: 568

A college education becomes truly meaningful when faith affects what happens in the classroom every day. According to David Dockery and Timothy George, it’s only by stepping into the great tradition of Christian thinking that students can take hold of the true power of their education. They demonstrate that vibrant, world-changing Christianity is not anti-intellectual; instead, it assumes a long tradition of vigorous Christian thinking and a commitment to the integration of faith and scholarship as essential to the preparation of a next generation of leaders in the church, the academy, and the world. As the first volume in a new series, this book introduces an approach to the Christian tradition that is not simply historical overview, but will also help students engage with contemporary challenges to their faith in various academic fields. This reader-friendly guidebook shows how to address those challenges by reclaiming the best of the Christian intellectual tradition. With illustrations, reflection questions, and a list of resources for further study, this book is sure to be a timely tool in the hands of believing students in both Christian and secular universities. Part of the Reclaiming the Christian Intellectual Tradition series.

The Great Funk

Falling Apart and Coming Together (on a Shag Rug) in the Seventies

Author: Thomas Hine

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 256

View: 834

In the sixties, as the nation anticipated the conquest of space, the defeat of poverty, and an end to injustice at home and abroad, no goal seemed beyond America's reach. Then the seventies arrived-bringing oil shocks and gas lines, the disgrace and resignation of a president, defeat in Vietnam, terrorism at the 1972 Munich Olympics, urban squalor, bizarre crimes, high prices, and a bad economy. The country fell into a great funk. But when things fall apart, you can take the fragments and make something fresh. Avocado kitchens and Earth Shoes may have been ugly, but they signaled new modes of seeing and being. The first generation to see Earth from space found ways to make life's everyday routines-eating, keeping warm, taking out the trash-meaningful, both personally and globally. And many decided to reinvent themselves. In Populuxe, a "textbook of consumerism in the Push Button Age" (Alan J. Adler, Los Angeles Times), Thomas Hine scrutinized the looks and life of the 1950s and 1960s, revealing the hopes and fears expressed in that era's design. In the same way, The Great Funk: Falling Apart and Coming Together (on a Shag Rug) in the Seventies maps a complex era by looking at its ideas, feelings, sex, fashions, textures, gestures, colors, demographic forces, artistic expressions, and other phenomena that shaped our lives. Hine gets into the shoes and heads of those who experienced the seventies-exploring their homes, feeling the beat of their music, and scanning the ads that incited their desires. But The Great Funk is more than a lavish catalogue of seventies culture: it's a smart, informed, lively look at the "Me decade" through the eyes of the man House & Garden called "America's sharpest design critic."

The Brooklyn Reader

Thirty Writers Celebrate America's Favorite Borough

Author: Andrea Wyatt

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 298

There is no other place quite like Brooklyn. Not only has it inspired and nurtured many native writers, it has had a profound impact on those passing through. The Brooklyn Reader features a rich diversity of writings -- short stories, poetry, essays, novels, biographies, and plays -- that offer thirty writers' unique and colorful experiences of New York City's biggest borough. Ranging from warm, nostalgic memories of childhood to humorous tales of new arrivals adjusting to the American way, or just stories of life's unplanned adventures, this reading tour is a true delight. Contributors include: Anatole Broyard Cristina Garcia Henry Miller Betty Smith Derek Walcott Truman Capote Spike Lee Isaac Bashevis Singer William Styron Walt Whitman

Farms Trees and Farmers

Responses to Agricultural Intensification

Author: J. E. Michael Arnold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 304

View: 100

This title aims to provide introductory and concluding surveys of the subject of farms, trees and farmers. Two central parts explore trends in farmer tree-growing and the factors which influence decision-making. Eight case studies cover, among other topics, the need for tree products, market access, the allocation of land and labour, and exposure to risk. In showing why farmers decide to grow or not grow trees, it seeks to increase the reader's knowledge about farming systems and to provide a guide to encouraging farm forestry throughout the world.