The Grammar of Spice

Author: Caz Hildebrand

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 607

The ultimate stylish kitchen resource, exploring the history of sixty spices and their uses--a must have for cooks and food lovers alike

The Grammar of Spice?

Notecards

Author: Caz Hildebrand

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 10

View: 940

The illustrations on these chic notecards are all taken from award-winning designer Caz Hildebrand's The Grammar of Spice, a culinary resource that illuminates the role of spices in food and in our cultural identity. Inspired by the work of Owen Jones, one of the great designers and travelers of his time, Hildebrand created abstract forms using vibrant colors to illustrate more than 60 spices. This stylish boxed set contains 16 individual notecards, each featuring a different design.

An Anarchy of Chilies

Author: Caz Hildebrand

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Hot peppers

Page: 224

View: 751

A reference book that introduces the nuances and versatility of 100 members the chili family in lively four-color illustrations, this volume presents everything the aspiring chef or gardener needs to help them harness the heat.

This Is Me, Full Stop.

The Art, Pleasures, and Playfulness of Punctuation

Author: Caz Hildebrand

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 273

From the cutting-edge London design agency Here Design - writer and poet Philip Cowell, and award-winning designer Caz Hildebrand, author of The Herbarium, this playful, original, beautifully designed book brings to life the punctuation marks we use every day, including: The dashing dash - So-called "quotation marks" The colon: and on and on. The shouty exclamation! The three dots of... (Not forgetting the brackets) And even more

A Grammar of Urarina

Author: Knut J. Olawsky

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 943

View: 408

Urarina is an endangered isolate spoken by less than 3,000 people in the rainforests of North-western Peru. This book aims at providing a comprehensive description of Urarina grammar covering all areas of the language. From a linguistic point of view, Urarina is particularly interesting because of a range of unusual grammatical characteristics that are rarely or not at all found in other languages. One remarkable property is the constituent order OVA/VS, which was classified as "non-existing" by Greenberg (1966). However, this atypical syntactic structure is a surprisingly consistent feature of Urarina, which discerns it from the majority of languages which are assumed to follow this syntactic pattern. Another feature probably unique to Urarina is the existence of a three-way distinction for person marking on all verbs. The choice of the respective paradigm depends on a complex set of syntactic and pragmatic conditions, which are investigated in detail. Scholars whose main interest is in morphology will also be intrigued by the polysynthetic verbal morphology of Urarina, which fits well into the Amazonian context. A Grammar of Urarina is based on the framework of basic linguistic theory, which will be accessible to scholars from a wide range of backgrounds. The straightforward presentation of linguistic structures is accompanied by in-depth discussion of the most interesting and unusual features, illustrated by examples for all grammatical phenomena and often summarised by tables or diagrams. This book fills a gap not only for studies in Amazonian languages but also from a typological perspective.

A Grammar of Prinmi

Based on the Central Dialect of Northwest Yunnan, China

Author: Picus Sizhi Ding

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 508

View: 776

In A Grammar of Prinmi Picus Ding provides the first in-depth description of a Tibeto-Burman language spoken by the Pǔmǐ Nationality and the Zàng Nationality in southwest China. Prinmi is closely related to the extinct language of Tangut.

A grammar of Papuan Malay

Author: Angela Kluge

Publisher: Language Science Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 880

View: 930

This book presents an in-depth linguistic description of one Papuan Malay variety, based on sixteen hours of recordings of spontaneous narratives and conversations between Papuan Malay speakers. ‘Papuan Malay’ refers to the easternmost varieties of Malay (Austronesian). They are spoken in the coastal areas of West Papua, the western part of the island of New Guinea. The variety described here is spoken along West Papua’s northeast coast. Papuan Malay is the language of wider communication and the first or second language for an ever-increasing number of people of the area. While Papuan Malay is not officially recognized and therefore not used in formal government or educational settings or for religious preaching, it is used in all other domains, including unofficial use in formal settings, and, to some extent, in the public media. After a general introduction to the language, its setting, and history, this grammar discusses the following topics, building up from smaller grammatical constituents to larger ones: phonology, word formation, noun and prepositional phrases, verbal and nonverbal clauses, non-declarative clauses, and conjunctions and constituent combining. Of special interest to linguists, typologists, and Malay specialists are the following in-depth analyses and descriptions: affixation and its productivity across domains of language choice, reduplication and its gesamtbedeutung, personal pronouns and their adnominal uses, demonstratives and locatives and their extended uses, and adnominal possessive relations and their non- canonical uses. This study provides a point of comparison for further studies in other (Papuan) Malay varieties and a starting point for Papuan Malay language development efforts.