The Gospel of Hip Hop

The First Instrument

Author: KRS-One

Publisher: powerHouse Books

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 832

View: 854

The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument, the first book from the I Am Hip Hop, is the philosophical masterwork of KRS ONE. Set in the format of the Christian Bible, this 800-plus-page opus is a life-guide manual for members of Hip Hop Kulture that combines classic philosophy with faith and practical knowledge for a fascinating, in-depth exploration of Hip Hop as a life path. Known as “The Teacha,” KRS ONE developed his unique outlook as a homeless teen in Brooklyn, New York, engaging his philosophy of self-creation to become one of the most respected emcees in Hip Hop history. Respected as Hip Hop’s true steward, KRS ONE painstakingly details the development of the culture and the ways in which we, as “Hiphoppas,” can and should preserve its future. "The Teacha" also discusses the origination of Hip Hop Kulture and relays specific instances in history wherein one can discover the same spirit and ideas that are at the core of Hip Hop’s current manifestation. He explains Hip Hop down to the actual meaning and linguistic history of the words “hip” and “hop,” and describes the ways in which "Hiphoppas" can change their current circumstances to create a future that incorporates Health, Love, Awareness, and Wealth (H-LAW). Committed to fervently promoting self-reliance, dedicated study, peace, unity, and truth, The "Teacha" has drawn both criticism and worship from within and from outside of Hip Hop Kulture. In this beautifully written, inspiring book, KRS ONE shines the light of truth, from his own empirical research over a 14-year period, into the fascinating world of Hip Hop.

Survival of the Fist: The Book of Revelations

Author: Chief Zulu

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 798

A timeline of historical events of Native/Moorish Americans and how this chain of events shaped America and the world as we know it today.

Religion and Hip Hop

Author: Monica R. Miller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 209

View: 623

Religion and Hip Hop brings together the category of religion, Hip Hop cultural modalities and the demographic of youth. Bringing postmodern theory and critical approaches in the study of religion to bear on Hip Hop cultural practices, this book examines how scholars in religious and theological studies have deployed and approached religion when analyzing Hip Hop data. Using existing empirical studies on youth and religion to the cultural criticism of the Humanities, Religion and Hip Hop argues that common among existing scholarship is a thin interrogation of the category of religion. As such, Miller calls for a redescription of religion in popular cultural analysis - a challenge she further explores and advances through various materialist engagements. Going beyond the traditional and more common approach of analyzing rap lyrics, from film, dance, to virtual reality, Religion and Hip Hop takes a fresh approach to exploring the paranoid posture of the religious in popular cultural forms, by going beyond what "is" religious about Hip Hop culture. Rather, Miller explores what rhetorical uses of religion in Hip Hop culture accomplish for various and often competing social and cultural interests.

Remix and Life Hack in Hip Hop

Towards a Critical Pedagogy of Music

Author: Michael B. MacDonald

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 138

View: 454

Many hiphoppas labour to sustain Hiphop Kulture in their communities far from the big stages, world tours, and hit singles enjoyed by a shockingly few American hiphoppas. The creative labour of these few mega stars is calculated in billions of dollars. But for most hiphoppas, their creative labour may never get expressed in economic terms. Instead it is expressed in social capital, the production of collective and individual subjectivities, the bonds of love that build and hold communities together, and the healing of broken hearts, broken homes, and broken neighborhoods in broken cities. Hiphop Kulture is NOT a music genre, it is MUCH more, and exploring how the sharing of aesthetic resources builds community, and how situated learning plays a necessary role in cultural sustainability draws out questions that may lead to a model of community located cultural education, and a starting point for a critical pedagogy of music. “I ain’t going to front, academics talking about hiphop scares me and often pisses me off. I’m protective about this culture like it’s my own baby because it’s meant so much to me and my close friends. In my less angry moments I do appreciate the fact that this culture still has so much to give to the rest of the world and that the next level is what we give back. Well, we need allies in this complex world to move things forward. As I’ve gotten to know Michael I consider him such an Ally and that his intent is firmly squared in empowering cats in the front lines. I also really dig the fact that he is committed to helping document the histories of those who laid the groundwork in the Edmonton scene. This is the respectful place to start. I look forward to bearing witness to Grass roots Hiphop reclaiming its voice and being at the forefront with academics supporting their community efforts.” – Stephen “Buddha” Leafloor, Founder of the Canadian Floor Masters, Founder of Blueprintforlife.ca, Ashoka Fellow, Social Worker and an aging bboy! “Dr. Michael B. MacDonald’s research into Hip Hop’s pedagogical ingenuity have not only led us to the grassroots of Hip Hop’s rich and vibrant global culture, but to the very Ethos of Hiphop. With bold examination, this exciting research stands at the forefront of contemporary post colonial Hiphop literature.” – Andre Hamilton aka Dre Pharoh, Executive Director Cipher5 Hiphop Academy, Temple of HipHop Canada

Hip Hop’s Hostile Gospel

A Post-Soul Theological Exploration

Author: Daniel White Hodge

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 327

In this book, Hodge takes into account the Christological, theological, and ecclesiological ruminations of a selected group of Hip Hop and rap song lyrics, interviews, and interviews from those defined as Hip Hoppers.

The Soul of Hip Hop

Rims, Timbs and a Cultural Theology

Author: Daniel White Hodge

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 249

What is Hip Hop? Hip hop speaks in a voice that is sometimes gruff, sometimes enraged, sometimes despairing, sometimes hopeful. Hip hop is the voice of forgotten streets laying claim to the high life of rims and timbs and threads and bling. Hip hop speaks in the muddled language of would-be prophets--mocking the architects of the status quo and stumbling in the dark toward a blurred vision of a world made right. What is hip hop? It's a cultural movement with a traceable theological center. Daniel White Hodge follows the tracks of hip-hop theology and offers a path from its center to the cross, where Jesus speaks truth.

This Way to Youth Ministry

Readings, Case Studies, Resources to Begin the Journey : Companion Guide

Author: Duffy Robbins

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 170

View: 408

A companion guide to This Way to Youth Ministry that offers practical applications, theological foundations, and valuable information for the student beginning a youth ministry.

The Church in the Age of Hip Hop

Author: Joseph Saunders

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 136

View: 478

Can God use Christian Hip Hop for His purposes? Why has Hip Hop received such a bad rep from the church? And should we let music preference divide God's church, stunt our spiritual growth, or interfere with our calling as Christians? Get answers to these questions and more in The Church in the Age of Hip Hop.

This Way to Youth Ministry

An Introduction to the Adventure

Author: Duffy Robbins

Publisher: Zondervan/Youth Specialties

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 608

View: 121

A FIELD GUIDE TO THE WILD LIFE OF YOUTH MINISTRY Youth Ministry. It’s quite an idea so much bigger than two words. One part odyssey, one part call, one part mission, and one part quest, youth ministry calls us into places of breathless exhilaration, stunning beauty, genuine peril, and unknown discovery. This is not terrain for the faint of heart. But it is a landscape of grace and wonder. This Way to Youth Ministry is the most complete academic text for those who might be called to such a journey. Thirty-year youth ministry veteran Duffy Robbins explores the theology, theory, and practice of youth ministry and helps you discover how to: Identify your calling to ministry Cultivate the traits and training that make a good youth pastor Set boundaries and maintain priorities Understand the spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical development on adolescents Navigate youth culture and postmodernism Understand youth ministry in relation to the rest of the Church Develop a team of volunteers who will walk the journey with you Develop and apply a personalized ministry philosophy With just the right mix of theory and application, this extensive academic text shows you both the big picture and the close-up details of making ministry work. Whether your journey is just beginning or well under way, This Way to Youth Ministry is the book that will help with everything that lies ahead.

The Hip Hop Movement

From R&B and the Civil Rights Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Generation

Author: Reiland Rabaka

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 516

View: 391

The Hip Hop Movement offers a critical theory and alternative history of rap music and hip hop culture by examining their roots in the popular musics and popular cultures of the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Movement. Connecting classic rhythm & blues and rock & roll to the Civil Rights Movement, and classic soul and funk to the Black Power Movement, The Hip Hop Movement explores what each of these musics and movements contributed to rap, neo-soul, hip hop culture, and the broader Hip Hop Movement. Ultimately, this book’s remixes (as opposed to chapters) reveal that black popular music and black popular culture have always been more than merely “popular music” and “popular culture” in the conventional sense and reflect a broader social, political, and cultural movement. With this in mind, sociologist and musicologist Reiland Rabaka critically reinterprets rap and neo-soul as popular expressions of the politics, social visions, and cultural values of a contemporary multi-issue movement: the Hip Hop Movement. Rabaka argues that rap music, hip hop culture, and the Hip Hop Movement are as deserving of critical scholarly inquiry as previous black popular musics, such as the spirituals, blues, ragtime, jazz, rhythm & blues, rock & roll, soul, and funk, and previous black popular movements, such as the Black Women’s Club Movement, New Negro Movement, Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Movement, Black Power Movement, Black Arts Movement, and Black Women’s Liberation Movement. This volume, equal parts alternative history of hip hop and critical theory of hip hop, challenges those scholars, critics, and fans of hip hop who lopsidedly over-focus on commercial rap, pop rap, and gangsta rap while failing to acknowledge that there are more than three dozen genres of rap music and many other socially and politically progressive forms of hip hop culture beyond DJing, MCing, rapping, beat-making, break-dancing, and graffiti-writing.