The Ghost Map

The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World

Author: Steven Johnson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 747

A National Bestseller, a New York Times Notable Book, and an Entertainment Weekly Best Book of the Year From Steven Johnson, the dynamic thinker routinely compared to James Gleick, Dava Sobel, and Malcolm Gladwell, The Ghost Map is a riveting page-turner about a real-life historical hero, Dr. John Snow. It's the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure -- garbage removal, clean water, sewers -- necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure. As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories and interconnectedness of the spread of disease, contagion theory, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.

Understanding Viruses

Author: Teri Shors

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 736

View: 542

The ideal text for undergraduate students majoring in biology, microbiology, medical technology, or pre-med, the Second Edition of Understanding Viruses provides a balanced approach to this fascinating discipline, combining the molecular, clinical, and historical aspects of virology. Updated throughout to keep pace with this fast-paced field, the text provides a strong, comprehensive introduction to human viral diseases. New material on molecular virology as well as new virus families presented coupled with chapters on viral diseases of animals; the history of clinical trials, gene therapy, and xenotranplantation; prions and viroids; plant viruses; and bacteriophages add to the scope of the text. Chapters discussing specific viral diseases weave in an epidemiological and global perspective and include treatment and prevention information. Contemporary case studies, Refresher Boxes, and Virus Files engage students in the learning process. With a wealth of student and instructor support tools, Understanding Viruses is an accessible, exciting, and engaging text for your virology course.

An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections

Author: Ron Barrett

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 168

View: 222

This book traces the social and environmental determinants of human infectious diseases from the Neolithic to the present day. Despite recent high profile discoveries of new pathogens, the major determinants of these emerging infections are ancient and recurring. These include changing modes of subsistence, shifting populations, environmental disruptions, and social inequalities. The recent labeling of the term "re-emerging infections" reflects a re-emergence, not so much of the diseases themselves, but rather a re-emerging awareness in affluent societies of long-standing problems that were previously ignored. An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections illustrates these recurring problems and determinants through an examination of three major epidemiological transitions. The First Transition occurred with the Agricultural Revolution beginning 10,000 years ago, bringing a rise in acute infections as the main cause of human mortality. The Second Transition first began with the Industrial Revolution; it saw a decline in infectious disease mortality and an increase in chronic diseases among wealthier nations, but less so in poorer societies. These culminated in today's "worst of both worlds syndrome" in which globalization has combined with the challenges of the First and Second Transitions to produce a Third Transition, characterized by a confluence of acute and chronic disease patterns within a single global disease ecology. This accessible text is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students and researchers in the fields of epidemiology, disease ecology, anthropology, health sciences, and the history of medicine. It will also be of relevance and use to undergraduate students interested in the history and social dynamics of infectious diseases.

Ecology of Urban Environments

Author: Kirsten M. Parris

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 154

Provides an accessible introduction to urban ecology, using established ecological theory to identify generalities in the complexity of urban environments. Examines the bio-physical processes of urbanization and how these influence the dynamics of urban populations, communities and ecosystems Explores the ecology of humans in cities Discusses practical strategies for conserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem services in urban environments Includes case studies with questions to improve retention and understanding

The PerformanceStat Potential

A Leadership Strategy for Producing Results

Author: Robert D. Behn

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 413

View: 864

It started two decades ago with CompStat in the New York City Police Department, and quickly jumped to police agencies across the U.S. and other nations. It was adapted by Baltimore, which created CitiStat—the first application of this leadership strategy to an entire jurisdiction. Today, governments at all levels employ PerformanceStat: a focused effort by public executives to exploit the power of purpose and motivation, responsibility and discretion, data and meetings, analysis and learning, feedback and follow-up—all to improve government's performance. Here, Harvard leadership and management guru Robert Behn analyzes the leadership behaviors at the core of PerformanceStat to identify how they work to produce results. He examines how the leaders of a variety of public organizations employ the strategy—the way the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services uses its DPSSTATS to promote economic independence, how the City of New Orleans uses its BlightStat to eradicate blight in city neighborhoods, and what the Federal Emergency Management Agency does with its FEMAStat to ensure that the lessons from each crisis response, recovery, and mitigation are applied in the future. How best to harness the strategy's full capacity? The PerformanceStat Potential explains all.

Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health

Author: Ellen L. Idler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 787

Frequently in partnership, but sometimes at odds, religious institutions and public health institutions work to improve the well-being of their communities. There is increasing awareness among public health professionals and the general public that the social conditions of poverty, lack of education, income inequality, poor working conditions, and experiences of discrimination play a dominant role in determining health status. But this broad view of the social determinants of health has largely ignored the role of religious practices and institutions in shaping the life conditions of billions around the globe. In Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health, leading scholars in the social sciences, public health, and religion address this omission by examining the embodied sacred practices of the world's religions, the history of alignment and tension between religious and public health institutions, the research on the health impact of religious practice throughout the life course, and the role of religious institutions in health and development efforts around the globe. In addition, the volume explores religion's role in the ongoing epidemics of HIV/AIDS and Alzheimer's disease, as well as preparations for an influenza pandemic. Together, these groundbreaking essays help complete the picture of the social determinants of health by including religion, which has until now been an invisible determinant.

Using Data to Focus Instructional Improvement

Author: Cheryl James-Ward

Publisher: ASCD

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 134

View: 350

Data. Does the word make you cringe? Does it evoke feelings of guilt? Are you unsure how to distill it and use it effectively? Grab this book and learn how to empower yourself and your school community with information gleaned from your school’s data. Experienced educators and authors offer simple instructions that can help focus school improvement efforts and result in increasing teacher expertise—a factor that positively affects the quality of life for students long after they have left the classroom. Accepting responsibility for such far-reaching influence requires educators to adopt instructional improvement as a standard by which a school needs to operate and as a means to collaborate and interact with one another. More than that, though, instructional improvement is an important component of successful schools. Learn how to improve instruction by * Collecting the right data—the right way. * Incorporating relevant data into everyone’s daily life. * Resisting the impulse to set brand-new goals every year. * Never settling for “good enough.” * Anticipating changes—big and small, local and federal. * Collaborating and avoiding privatized practice. * Involving all stakeholders in identifying problems, setting goals, and analyzing data. * Agreeing on what constitutes high-quality instruction and feedback. The challenge is to understand that data—not intuition or anecdotal reports—are tools to be used in getting better at teaching students. And teaching students effectively is what schools are all about. Following the guidance in this book, overcome uncertainty and concerns about data as you learn to collect and analyze both soft and hard data and use their secrets for instructional improvement in your school. Data. Does the word make you cringe? Does it evoke feelings of guilt? Are you unsure how to distill it and use it effectively? Grab this book and learn how to empower yourself and your school community with information gleaned from your school’s data. Experienced educators and authors offer simple instructions that can help focus school improvement efforts and result in increasing teacher expertise—a factor that positively affects the quality of life for students long after they have left the classroom. Accepting responsibility for such far-reaching influence requires educators to adopt instructional improvement as a standard by which a school needs to operate and as a means to collaborate and interact with one another. More than that, though, instructional improvement is an important component of successful schools. Learn how to improve instruction by * Collecting the right data—the right way. * Incorporating relevant data into everyone’s daily life. * Resisting the impulse to set brand-new goals every year. * Never settling for “good enough.” * Anticipating changes—big and small, local and federal. * Collaborating and avoiding privatized practice. * Involving all stakeholders in identifying problems, setting goals, and analyzing data. * Agreeing on what constitutes high-quality instruction and feedback. The challenge is to understand that data—not intuition or anecdotal reports—are tools to be used in getting better at teaching students. And teaching students effectively is what schools are all about. Following the guidance in this book, overcome uncertainty and concerns about data as you learn to collect and analyze both soft and hard data and use their secrets for instructional improvement in your school.

How We Got to Now

Six Innovations That Made the Modern World

Author: Steven Johnson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 304

View: 649

From the New York Times–bestselling author of Where Good Ideas Come From and Farsighted, a new look at the power and legacy of great ideas. In this illustrated history, Steven Johnson explores the history of innovation over centuries, tracing facets of modern life (refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, to name a few) from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended historical consequences. Filled with surprising stories of accidental genius and brilliant mistakes—from the French publisher who invented the phonograph before Edison but forgot to include playback, to the Hollywood movie star who helped invent the technology behind Wi-Fi and Bluetooth—How We Got to Now investigates the secret history behind the everyday objects of contemporary life. In his trademark style, Johnson examines unexpected connections between seemingly unrelated fields: how the invention of air-conditioning enabled the largest migration of human beings in the history of the species—to cities such as Dubai or Phoenix, which would otherwise be virtually uninhabitable; how pendulum clocks helped trigger the industrial revolution; and how clean water made it possible to manufacture computer chips. Accompanied by a major six-part television series on PBS, How We Got to Now is the story of collaborative networks building the modern world, written in the provocative, informative, and engaging style that has earned Johnson fans around the globe.

In Praise of Mixed Religion

The Syncretism Solution in a Multifaith World

Author: William H. Harrison

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 126

When asked "What religion do you follow?" the typical answer is to name a specific group, or to respond "None." An increasing number of people, however, are intentionally combining elements from various religious heritages, demonstrating that religions do not have firm boundaries, nor are they purely distinct. In Praise of Mixed Religion discusses the concept of syncretism, the term for the mixing of religious perspectives. The religious studies discipline has traditionally distinguished between two responses to syncretism: a subjective view, which treats syncretism as morally reprehensible, and an objective view, which treats it as a morally neutral phenomenon. William Harrison adopts a third perspective, the advocacy view, which claims that mixing religions is a good and necessary process. He cites countless examples - such as Islam's transformative encounter with Greek thought - from both history and recent years to show how religious traditions have gained theological and practical wisdom by borrowing key ideas, beliefs, and practices from outside their own movements. By encouraging syncretism, In Praise of Mixed Religion contests the hard boundaries between religious worldviews and presents a dramatic alternative for thinking and talking about religion.

Public Health and Community Nursing E-Book

Frameworks for practice

Author: Dianne Watkins

Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 336

View: 395

The third edition of this popular and useful text has been thoroughly updated to reflect the many major changes that have taken place in community nursing, making it an invaluable and up-to-date reference for all community nursing courses. The book covers the current public health landscape, epidemiology, frameworks for practice, with sections on family, and on the different Community Public Health Nurse Specialists. ‘Real-life’ case-studies link theory and practice, and promote further enquiry Discussion points encourage student reflection on methods of enhancing their professional and practice development A framework approach promotes development of practice Key issues begin, and Summaries end, each chapter to aid studying References and recommended reading promote depth and breadth of study. Thorough revision to reflect changes in community nursing More emphasis on public health reflects current government emphasis New chapters on: Chronic disease management Educational FrameworksCollaborative working Occupational Health NursesAdvanced Nurse PractitionersNurse prescribing