The Genuine Life of Robert Barker

Dictated by Himself While in a State of Total Darkness; And Commencing from the Earliest Period of This Recollection, in the Year 1732, Till This Publication Took Place, in the Month of November, 1809;

Author: Robert Barker

Publisher: Gale and the British Library

ISBN:

Category: Adventure and adventurers

Page: 391

View: 652

containing a clear account of his remarkable travels, voyages, difficulties, sufferings, and other uncommon events, deemed most worthy of observation throughout the whole course of his natural life

The Genuine Life of Robert Barker

Dictated by Himself While in a State of Total Darkness, and Commencing from the Earliest Period of His Recollection, in the Year 1732, Till this Publication Took Place, in the Month of November 1908, Containing a Clear Account of His Remarkable Travels, Voyages, Difficulties, Sufferings and Other Uncommon Events, Deemed Most Worthy of Observation Throughout the Whole Course of His Natural Life

Author: Robert Barker

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Adventure and adventurers

Page: 391

View: 883

The Genuine Life of Robert Barker

Dictated by Himself While in a State of Total Darkness ; and Commencing from the Earliest Period of this Recollection, in the Year 1732, Till [sic] this Publication Took Place, in the Month of November, 1809 ; Containing a Clear Account of His Remarkable Travels, Voyages, Difficulties, Sufferings, and Other Uncommon Events, Deemed Most Worthy of Observation Throughout the Whole Course of His Natural Life

Author: Robert Barker

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 391

View: 227

Critical Perspectives on Colonialism

Writing the Empire from Below

Author: Fiona Paisley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 602

This collection brings much-needed focus to the vibrancy and vitality of minority and marginal writing about empire, and to their implications as expressions of embodied contact between imperial power and those negotiating its consequences from "below." The chapters explore how less powerful and less privileged actors in metropolitan and colonial societies within the British Empire have made use of the written word and of the power of speech, public performance, and street politics. This book breaks new ground by combining work about marginalized figures from within Britain as well as counterparts in the colonies, ranging from published sources such as indigenous newspapers to ordinary and everyday writings including diaries, letters, petitions, ballads, suicide notes, and more. Each chapter engages with the methodological implications of working with everyday scribblings and asks what these alternate modernities and histories mean for the larger critique of the "imperial archive" that has shaped much of the most interesting writing on empire in the past decade.

The Real Oliver Twist

Robert Blincoe: A life that illuminates an age

Author: John Waller

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 584

From a parish workhouse to the heart of the industrial revolution, from debtors' jail to Cambridge University and a prestigious London church, Robert Blincoe's political, personal and turbulent story illuminates the Dickensian age like never before. In 1792 as revolution, riot and sedition spread across Europe, Robert Blincoe was born in the calm of rural St Pancras parish. At four he was abandoned to a workhouse, never to see his family again. At seven, he was sent 200 miles north to work in one of the cotton mills of the dawning industrial age. He suffered years of unrelenting abuse, a life dictated by the inhuman rhythm of machines. Like Dickens' most famous character, Blincoe rebelled after years of servitude. He fought back against the mill owners, earning beatings but gaining self-respect. He joined the campaign to protect children, gave evidence to a Royal Commission into factory conditions and worked with extraordinary tenacity to keep his own children from the factories. His life was immortalised in one of the most remarkable biographies ever written, A Memoir of Robert Blincoe. Renowned popular historian John Waller tells the true story of a parish boy's progress with passion and in enthralling detail.

Parenting in England 1760-1830

Emotion, Identity, and Generation

Author: Joanne Bailey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 161

Parenting in England is the first study of the world of parenting in late Georgian England. The author, Joanne Bailey, traces ideas about parenthood in a Christian society that was responding to new cultural trends of sensibility, romanticism and domesticity, along with Enlightenment ideas about childhood and self. All these shaped how people, from the poor to the genteel, thought about themselves as parents, and remembered their own parents. With meticulous attention to detail, Bailey illuminates the range of intense emotions provoked by parenthood by investigating a rich array of sources from memoirs and correspondence, to advice literature, fiction, and court records, to prints, engravings, and ballads. Parenting was also a profoundly embodied experience, and the book captures the effort, labour, and hard work it entailed. Such parental investment meant that the experience was fundamental to the forging of national, familial, and personal identities. It also needed more than two parents and this book uncovers the hitherto hidden world of shared parenting. At all levels of society, household and kinship ties were drawn upon to lighten the labours of parenting. By revealing these emotional and material parental worlds, what emerges is the centrality of parenthood to mental and physical well-being, reputation, public and personal identities, and to transmitting prized values across generations. Yet being a parent was a contingent experience adapting from hour to hour, year to year, and child to child. It was at once precarious, as children and parents succumbed to fatal diseases and accidents, yet it was also enduring because parent-child relationships were not ended by death: lost children and parents lived on in memory.

The African Slave Trade and Its Suppression

A Classified and Annotated Bibliography of Books, Pamphlets and Periodical

Author: Peter Hogg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 885

A comprehensive bibliography dealing specifically with African slave trade. This volume has been sub-classified for easier consultation and the compiler has provided, where possible, descriptions and comments on the works listed.

The Celebrated George Barrington

A Spurious Author, the Book Trade, and Botany Bay

Author: Nathan Garvey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Australia

Page: 327

View: 944

This book traces the genesis of the Barrington books in rich and evocative detail, offering a compelling account of publishing history in England and on the continent, and displaying the subtle machinations of the book trade in a world without copyright laws. Throughout, The Celebrated George Barrington combines the rigour of book history and bibliographical research with a fresh and engaging style. Of special interest is Garvey's authoritative bibliography of the Barrington books, with extensive notes and detailed collation details, destined to become a standard reference for librarians, scholars and booksellers. With more than eighty separate works noticed, this is the first comprehensive account of the Barrington books and the first to chart the publishing history of the works about and attributed to George Barrington, which have long remained a source of confusion for students of early Australian history. Elegantly printed in two-colours, and bound in red cloth with a full-colour dustjacket, the work includes some twenty-six illustrations, all taken from the early Barrington books.

Gulliver

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English literature

Page:

View: 507

Modern Reports

Or, Select Cases Adjudged in the Courts of King's Bench, Chancery, Common Pleas, and Exchequer ... [1663-1755]

Author: Great Britain. Courts

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law reports, digests, etc

Page:

View: 233

The Blind in British Society

Charity, State, and Community, C. 1780-1930

Author: Gordon Ashton Phillips

Publisher: Ashgate Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 610

Taking as its starting point the establishment, in the late 18th century, of philanthropic institutions for the blind, this book traces the development and conduct of voluntary charities for the visually impaired to the first decades of the 20th century. As well as examining the policies and administration of charitable bodies, it also considers external influences - intellectual, social and economic - which shaped their character and practice. Through this detailed study of a single class of disabled person, a considerable contribution is made to the wider literature on the 'mixed economy of welfare' and the history of charity generally. The proper place of the disabled in their society was an issue under discussion throughout the period covered by this book; and it was a question that always aroused uncertainties and disagreements. A systematic historical study of attitudes towards the blind reveals much about the experience of physical disability and society's shifting responses to it.