The Frances Smith

Palace Steamer of the Upper Great Lakes, 1867-1896

Author: Scott L. Cameron

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 288

View: 402

The Frances Smith was not only the first steamboat to be built in Owen Sound, but also the largest vessel on Georgian Bay at that time. By far the most luxurious vessel to sail the Upper Great Lakes from a Canadian port, she was known as a "palace steamer." In the mid-to-late-19th century, the Frances Smith set the standard for speed, spacious accommodation and quality service on Georgian Bay and Lake Superior. The story of the Frances Smith, full of adventure and courageous actions, and even including disreputable behaviour, is a genuine story of life on the Great Lakes in the latter part of the 1800s. Meticulously researched and documented by Scott L. Cameron, this book is an exploration of a special part of our past that will be of great interest to history buffs in general, and maritime historians in particular.

New Milford

Author: Frances L. Smith

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 867

New Milford is located in western Connecticut, in the lower portion of Litchfield County. The original inhabitants of the area were the Potatuck who, along with other tribes, retreated as settlement of the region began--the first in the county being in Woodbury in 1672. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, the land that later became New Milford was purchased from the Indians, and the first settler, John Noble, arrived from Massachusetts and built a home here in 1707. As the centuries progressed, so did the town. New Milford became a business center with many mills, shops, taverns, and other services. In stunning images and clear narrative, New Milford traces the history not only of the town itself but also of many of the families whose names are an integral part of the community, among them the Bostwicks, the Heacocks, and the Kings. The book follows the development of the town--its industry, such as New Milford Pottery, its educational facilities, such as Canterbury School, and its familiar places, such as the Wayside Inn.

Written by Herself

Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892

Author: Frances Smith Foster

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 206

View: 884

"...substantial contribution to African-American Studies and women's studies." —Mississippi Quarterly "A bravura performance by an accomplished scholar... it strikes a perfect balance between insightful literary analysis and historical investigation." —Eighteenth-Century Studies "... an impressive study of a wide range of writers.... Foster's work is both scholarly and accessible. Her prose is economical and direct, making this book enjoyable as well as instructive." —Belles Lettres "... an impressively wide-ranging discussion of texts and contexts... " —Signs "Foster has written a fine book that provides the reader with a context for understanding the importance of the written word for women who chose to 'set the record straight'." —Journal of American History "... fascinating, meticulously researched... Likely to prove seminal in the field... highly recommended... " —Library Journal "ÂWritten by Herself comprises a volume of remarkable female characters whose desires for social change often made them catalysts for spiritual awakening in their own times." —MultiCultural Review "... an outstanding piece of scholarship... Foster's book offers deeply intelligent, provocative, totally accessible analysis of a tradition and of writers still not sufficiently read and taught." —American Literature "Well written and thoroughly researched. Highly recommended... " —Choice The first comprehensive cultural history of literature by African American women prior to the 20th century. From the oral histories of Alice, a slave born in 1686, to the literary tradition that included Jarena Lee and Octavia Victoria Rogers Albert, this literature was argument, designed to correct or to instruct an audience often ignorant about or even hostile to black women.

Growing Up While Going Down the Rabbit Hole

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Page Publishing Inc

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 270

View: 891

As the author’s childhood tumbles from her memory onto the pages of print, the reader is privy to all sorts of surprising revelations. Be prepared to chuckle with glee, feel your mouth gape reading about situations too weird to be untrue, wince as your heart breaks in sadness and anger over sordid situations, and shake your head both in disbelief and even perfect understanding of unusual childhood tales. Between the covers of the book, the author’s very direct style in sharing the goings-on around her that profoundly affected her talks to the reader personally and even bluntly. As the years pass, the toll from various elements in her life becomes clearer and grows higher. The book’s title was chosen because it chronicles from a curious angle a young girl’s memories of growing up. The story’s framework of recollections connected to given residences, the number of those residences, and the regularity with which this family migrated from one to another was interesting from the storytelling perspective and fortunate for Frances and all her readers. That her memories were mentally magnetized, that they attached and were thereby preserved according to the various times and places Frances called home, was an innovative, efficient, and effective writing device. Use of the rabbit hole idiom was spot-on, because despite growing older, taller, and maturing in ways (growing up), simultaneously an ominous, downward momentum was also steadily gaining more of a foothold in the life of this young person. Left unchecked, this destructive force would increasingly result in a stranger, more problematic, and chaotic life, an exquisite analogy provided by Lewis Carroll. The story shared within this book is a poignant and absorbing account as seen through the eyes of the child who lived it. Much is revealed throughout this narrative, and although the book ends, the story obviously continues. The indubitable question is not written but silently screams, what happens next?

Bande de Filles

Girlhood Identities in Contemporary France

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 104

View: 817

Few films in the twenty-first century have represented coming-of-age with the beauty and brutality of Bande de Filles (or Girlhood). This book provides an in-depth examination of Céline Sciamma’s film, focusing on its portrayal of female adolescence in contemporary Paris. Motivated by the absence of black female characters in French cinema, Sciamma represents the lives of figures that have passed largely unnoticed on the big screen. While observing the girls’ tough circumstances, Sciamma’s film emphasises the joy and camaraderie found in female friendships. This book places Girlhood in its cinematic as well as its sociocultural context. Pop music, urban violence, and female friendships are all considered here in a book that draws out the complexity of Sciamma’s deceptively simple portrayal of coming-of-age. Thoughtful, concise, and deeply contemporary, this book is perfect for students, scholars, and general readers interested in youth cultures, European cinema, gender, and sexuality.

Frances Worthen Papers

Author: Frances Smith Worthen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Women designers

Page: 21

View: 963

The Frances Worthen papers contain technical and engineering drawings for industrial parts and creative drawings for poems, invitations, and birthday greetings -- all created by Frances Worthen (1899-1982), an industrial designer and interior decorator/designer based in Glendale, California.

Witnessing Slavery

The Development of Ante-bellum Slave Narratives

Author: Charles Howard Candler Professor of English and Womens Studies Frances Smith Foster

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 117

**** New edition of the Greenwood Press original of 1979 (which is cited in BCL3), with a new introduction, chapter, and a supplementary bibliography. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.

CLEFT OF THE ROCK

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Ordinary Man Trilogy

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 362

View: 262

Mark Smith thought he'd been called to mission work, to serve God in Nome, Alaska. He sold his car to buy a one-way plane ticket, dropped out of college, gave up his campus housing, and quit his job. When his plane landed in Nome, he discovered the state had pulled the funding for the job he'd been offered. Six thousand miles from home, with everything he owned in his pockets, he was filled with a blinding anger and overwhelming sense of betrayal. Desperate for answers, he stormed into the hills surrounding Nome. Soon he was six miles from town, atop Anvil Mountain--the highest peak in the area--and facing a strong storm blowing in from the north. He was clad in only the jeans, sneakers, and thin shirt he'd worn on the plane. His face was pelted by sleet and gusts of wind and freezing rain, his clothes frozen to his body and his tears to his face. Knowing he was in serious trouble, he crawled into the only space available to get out of the wind--a cleft below the anvil formation in Anvil Rock. Too cold even to pray, he squeezed as far up into the rock as he could and passed out. The cleft of the rock became a powerful metaphor for God's protection and the fruitful ministry he would plant in this rugged terrain with temperatures reach- ing -40. Join Mark as he hunts with a dog team, ice fishes through the frozen Bering Sea, builds a church from the ground up, and finds ways to minister to the natives while growing spiritually in ways he never could have imagined.

My Children's Ancestors and Kinfolk

Author: Frances Smith Chancellor

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 284

View: 730

Frances Clyde Smith (b. 1913) was the wife of George Archie Chancellor. They had two children. She was the descendant of Thomas Smith (1648- 1694) who was born in Exeter, England and died in South Carolina. He descended from Thomas Chancellor (1691-1861) and Katherine Fitzgerald Cooper of Maryland and Virginia. Ancestors also came from Jamaica, Ireland, Germany, Scotland and elsewhere.

Witnessing Slavery

The Development of Ante-bellum Slave Narratives

Author: Charles Howard Candler Professor of English and Womens Studies Frances Smith Foster

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 493

**** New edition of the Greenwood Press original of 1979 (which is cited in BCL3), with a new introduction, chapter, and a supplementary bibliography. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.

The First Book of Conservation

Author: Frances C. Smith

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Conservation of natural resources

Page: 68

View: 145

Explains the give and take in nature that provides the balance necessary for conservation. Grades 4-7.

In Fear of Her Life

The true story of a violent marriage

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Maverick House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 125

Smith is the pseudonym for a woman who lived in fear of her life for 22 years. Married at 16 to a Dublin criminal, she endured years of relentless mental and physical torture until she found the strength to fight back. This is her courageous story told with brutal honesty and at times humour. It chronicles her descent to the brink of suicide and consequent rebuilding of her life. This unique account is essential reading for all those who have ever endured cruelty at the hands of a man, or another human being for that matter. It gives hope to all those who have been victimised. The names and identities of the characters in the book have been changed to protect the author

Rethinking the Hollywood Teen Movie

Gender, Genre and Identity

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 200

View: 922

Uses philosophical thinking on delayed cinema, time and ethics to provide a new approach to reading film

Yarraville

Village and Club, Class and Community

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Yarraville (Vic.)

Page: 58

View: 869

America's Best Female Sharpshooter

The Rise and Fall of Lillian Frances Smith

Author: Julia Bricklin

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 125

Today, most remember “California Girl” Lillian Frances Smith (1871–1930) as Annie Oakley’s chief competitor in the small world of the Wild West shows’ female shooters. But the two women were quite different: Oakley’s conservative “prairie beauty” persona clashed with Smith’s tendency to wear flashy clothes and keep company with the cowboys and American Indians she performed with. This lively first biography chronicles the Wild West showbiz life that Smith led and explores the talents that made her a star. Drawing on family records, press accounts, interviews, and numerous other sources, historian Julia Bricklin peels away the myths that enshroud Smith’s fifty-year career. Known as “The California Huntress” before she was ten years old, Smith was a professional sharpshooter by the time she reached her teens, shooting targets from the back of a galloping horse in Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West. Not only did Cody offer $10,000 to anyone who could beat her, but he gave her top billing, setting the stage for her rivalry with Annie Oakley. Being the best female sharpshooter in the United States was not enough, however, to differentiate Lillian Smith from Oakley and a growing number of ladylike cowgirls. So Smith reinvented herself as “Princess Wenona,” a Sioux with a violent and romantic past. Performing with Cody and other showmen such as Pawnee Bill and the Miller brothers, Smith led a tumultuous private life, eventually taking up the shield of a forged Indian persona. The morals of the time encouraged public criticism of Smith’s lack of Victorian femininity, and the press’s tendency to play up her rivalry with Oakley eventually overshadowed Smith’s own legacy. In the end, as author Julia Bricklin shows, Smith cared more about living her life on her own terms than about her public image. Unlike her competitors who shot to make a living, Lillian Smith lived to shoot.

Lamp to My Feet

Author: Frances Smith

Publisher: Gazelle Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 631

God never promises us a sweeping floodlight that will show us the whole picture, but He does promise us a lamp to our feet so we can see the next step. We have to learn to trust Him to do that, and take the next step on faith.