The Fatal Eggs and Other Soviet Satire

Author:

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 305

View: 572

A classic anthology of wildly inventive and comic tales that brilliantly satirize post-revolutionary Russia. “Amusing and excellent,” this famous collection of Soviet satire from 1918 to 1963 devastatingly lampoons the social, economic, and cultural changes wrought by the Russian Revolution (Isaac Bashevis Singer). Among the seventeen bold and inventive writers represented here are the brilliant Mikhail Bulgakov, Ilf and Petrov, Mikhail Zoshchenko, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Valentin Katayev, and Yuri Kazakov. Whether the stories and novellas collected here take the form of allegory, fantasy, or science fiction, the results are ingenious, critical, and hilariously timeless. “The stories in this collection tell the reader more about Soviet life than a dozen sociological or political tracts.” —Isaac Bashevis Singer “An altogether admirable collection . . . by the highly talented translator Mirra Ginsburg . . . Many of these stories and sketches are delicious, even-a miracle!-funny, and full of subtlety and intelligence.” —The New Leader “Hilarious entertainment. Beyond this it illuminates with the cruel light of satire the reality behind the pretentious façade of the Soviet state.” —The Sunday Sun

Religion And Modernization In The Soviet Union

Author: Dennis J. Dunn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 356

To the surprise of many students of the Soviet Union, religion has shown itself to be a force still powerful in Soviet society. In contrast, the impact of religion in developed Western societies has declined. Dr. Dunn points out that the study of this antinomy can shed light on the entire concept of "modernization" in the U.S.S.R. The study of the

Flight and Bliss

Author: Mikhail Afanasevich Bulgakov

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 158

View: 401

Two plays deal with the efforts of a group of white officers to survive after the end of the Civil War, and an engineer who travels into the past in a time machine and returns with Ivan the Terrible.

The Fatal Eggs

Author: Mikhail Bulgakov

Publisher: Translit Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 852

As the turbulent years following the Russian revolution of 1917 settle down into a new Soviet reality, the brilliant and eccentric zoologist Persikov discovers an amazing ray that drastically increases the size and reproductive rate of living organisms. At the same time, a mysterious plague wipes out all the chickens in the Soviet republics. The government expropriates Persikov's untested invention in order to rebuild the poultry industry, but a horrible mix-up quickly leads to a disaster that could threaten the entire world. This H. G. Wells-inspired novel by the legendary Mikhail Bulgakov is the only one of his larger works to have been published in its entirety during the author's lifetime. A poignant work of social science fiction and a brilliant satire on the Soviet revolution, it can now be enjoyed by English-speaking audiences through this accurate new translation. Includes annotations and afterword.

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

Author: University Prof of Russian and Comparative Literature Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 972

View: 904

"This guide provides informative essays and selective bibliographies on the main writers of Russian for students and general readers. Covering all of Russian literature, this handbook emphasizes 19th- and 20th-century authors. The guide uses the Western alphabet, so anonymous works appear under their English title and are interfiled in alphabetical order with author entries. Entries for writers include a brief biography, a list of the writer's primary works in chronological order, a selected list of bibliographies, and critical studies. The guide begins with 13 detailed essays that cover most periods, topics, and genres of Russian literature. This reference source belongs in all libraries with large literature collections".--"Outstanding Reference Sources : the 1999 Selection of New Titles", American Libraries, May 1999. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.

Stalin

Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

Author: Stephen Kotkin

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 976

View: 356

A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler’s son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts. Where did such power come from? In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker—unique among Bolsheviks—and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin’s unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will—perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history. Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime’s inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin’s psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin’s near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution’s structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin’s momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia. The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 will be published by Penguin Press in October 2017

Russian Literature Since the Revolution

Author: Edward James Brown

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 413

View: 386

Surveys the major writers, organizations, and movements in modern Russian literature and examines the clash between writers and the state

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

50th-Anniversary Edition (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Author: Mikhail Bulgakov

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 798

A 50th-anniversary Deluxe Edition of the incomparable 20th-century masterpiece of satire and fantasy, in a newly revised version of the acclaimed Pevear and Volokhonsky translation Nothing in the whole of literature compares with The Master and Margarita. One spring afternoon, the Devil, trailing fire and chaos in his wake, weaves himself out of the shadows and into Moscow. Mikhail Bulgakov’s fantastical, funny, and devastating satire of Soviet life combines two distinct yet interwoven parts, one set in contemporary Moscow, the other in ancient Jerusalem, each brimming with historical, imaginary, frightful, and wonderful characters. Written during the darkest days of Stalin’s reign, and finally published in 1966 and 1967, The Master and Margarita became a literary phenomenon, signaling artistic and spiritual freedom for Russians everywhere. This newly revised translation, by the award-winning team of Pevear and Volokhonsky, is made from the complete and unabridged Russian text. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Russian Drama of the Revolutionary Period

Author: Robert Russell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 728

Contents: Russian Drama before the Revolution; Soviet Drama 1917-1921; The Civil War in Soviet Drama; Bulgakov's^R The White Guard and Flight; Satirical Comedy and Melodrama; The Plays of Nikolay Erdman; Mayakovsky's The Bedbug and The Bathhouse; Indirect Social Comment; Towards Socialist Realism

Mikhail Bulgakov

life and interpretations

Author: Anthony Colin Wright

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 324

View: 544