The Evolution of the Wooden Ship

Author: Basil Greenhill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 510

This work touches on the specialized world of wooden-ship building, looking at the endless variations of techniques from country to country, region to region, and over the course of history.

A Short History of the Sailing Ship

Author: Romola Anderson

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 212

View: 924

This amply illustrated, nontechnical book traces the evolution of the sailing ship over the course of 6,000 years — from those of ancient Egypt and Crete (4000-1000 B.C.) to the full-rigged clipper ships of the 19th century. The development of northern and southern European vessels is also described. 20 halftones and 134 figures.

The Philosophy of Shipbuilding

Conceptual Approaches to the Study of Wooden Ships

Author: Frederick M. Hocker

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 183

View: 413

This book is dedicated to J Richard Steffy, a leading figure in the study of ancient shipbuilding, and draws heavily upon his conceptual approach to ship design and construction which places emphasis on the shipwright's personality, culture, technical ability and experiences.

A Short History of Naval and Marine Engineering

Author: Edgar C. Smith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 430

View: 586

Originally published in 1938, this book was written to provide an account of the historical development of naval and marine engineering. The material which formed the basis of the text was gathered together from a variety of sources during a period of approximately thirty years. Technical papers, presidential addresses, journals, textbooks, biographies, official regulations, personal letters, reminiscences and previously unpublished manuscripts were all drawn upon to illustrate the many aspects of naval and marine engineering. Numerous illustrative figures are included throughout. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of engineering.

The Seaforth Bibliography

A Guide to More Than 4000 Works on British Naval History 55BC – 1815

Author: Eugene Rasor

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 900

View: 885

This remarkable work is a comprehensive historiographical and bibliographical survey of the most important scholarly and printed materials about the naval and maritime history of England and Great Britain from the earliest times to 1815. More than 4,000 popular, standard and official histories, important articles in journals and periodicals, anthologies, conference, symposium and seminar papers, guides, documents and doctoral theses are covered so that the emphasis is the broadest possible. But the work is far, far more than a listing. The works are all evaluated, assessed and analysed and then integrated into an historical narrative that makes the book a hugely useful reference work for student, scholar, and enthusiast alike. It is divided into twenty-one chapters which cover resource centres, significant naval writers, pre-eminent and general histories, the chronological periods from Julius Caesar through the Vikings, Tudors and Stuarts to Nelson and Bligh, major naval personalities, warships, piracy, strategy and tactics, exploration, discovery and navigation, archaeology and even naval fiction. Quite simply, no-one with an interest and enthusiasm for naval history can afford to be without this book at their side.

Lost Voyages

Two Centuries of Shipwrecks in the Approaches to New York

Author: Bradley Sheard

Publisher: Aqua Quest Publications, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 216

View: 690

Documents hundreds of nineteenth and twentieth century shipwrecks in and around New York's waters

The Sea-Craft of Prehistory

Author: Paul Johnstone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 257

The nautical dimension of prehistory has not so far received the attention it deserves. It is also too often assumed that early man was land bound, yet this is demonstrably not the case. Recent research has shown that man travelled and tracked over greater distances and at a much earlier date than has previously been thought possible. Some of these facts can be explained only by man's mastery of water transport from earliest times. This book, by an acknowledged expert on prehistoric sea-craft, examines these problems looking at the new archaeological information in the light of the author's nautical knowledge. The result is a detailed account of man's use of inland and ocean-going craft from earliest times until the dawn of recorded history. All forms of evidence are critically assessed, from the vessels of Ancient Egypt to the Chinese junk, to present of comprehensive picture of the vessels men have built through the ages, and of the variety of ways in which they have been used.

Wood, Whiskey and Wine

A History of Barrels

Author: Henry H. Work

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 722

Barrels—we rarely acknowledge their importance, but without them we would be missing out on some of the world’s finest beverages—most notably whiskies and wines—and of course for over two thousand years they’ve been used to store, transport, and age an incredibly diverse array of provisions around the globe. In this comprehensive and wide-ranging book, Henry Work tells the intriguing story of the significant and ever-evolving role wooden barrels have played during the last two millennia, revealing how the history of the barrel parallels that of technology at large. Exploring how barrels adapted to the requirements of the world’s changing economy, Work journeys back to the barrel’s initial development, describing how the Celtic tribes of Northern Europe first crafted them in the first millennia BCE. He shows how barrels became intrinsically linked to the use of wood and ships and grew into a vital and flexible component of the shipping industry, used to transport not only wine and beer, but also nails, explosives, and even Tabasco sauce. Going beyond the shipping of goods, Work discusses the many uses of this cylindrical container and its relations—including its smaller cousin, the keg—and examines the process of aging different types of alcohol. He also looks at how barrels have survived under threat from today’s plastics, cardboards, and metals. Offering a new way of thinking about one of the most enduring and successful products in history, Wood, Whiskey and Wine will be a must-read for everyone from technology buffs to beverage aficionados who wish to better understand that evasive depth of flavor.

The Wanderer

The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails

Author: Erik Calonius

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 821

On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer's mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation's descent into civil war. The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic. As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer's tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer. In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period.