The Eponym Dictionary of Birds

Author: Bo Beolens

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 624

View: 851

Birdwatchers often come across bird names that include a person's name, either in the vernacular (English) name or latinised in the scientific nomenclature. Such names are properly called eponyms, and few people will not have been curious as to who some of these people were (or are). Names such as Darwin, Wallace, Audubon, Gould and (Gilbert) White are well known to most people. Keener birders will have yearned to see Pallas's Warbler, Hume's Owl, Swainson's Thrush, Steller's Eider or Brünnich's Guillemot. But few people today will have even heard of Albertina's Myna, Barraband's Parrot, Guerin's Helmetcrest or Savigny's Eagle Owl. This extraordinary new work lists more than 4,000 eponymous names covering 10,000 genera, species and subspecies of birds. Every taxon with an eponymous vernacular or scientific name (whether in current usage or not) is listed, followed by a concise biography of the person concerned. These entries vary in length from a few lines to several paragraphs, depending on the availability of information or the importance of the individual's legacy. The text is punctuated with intriguing or little-known facts, unearthed in the course of the authors' extensive research. Ornithologists will find this an invaluable reference, especially to sort out birds named after people with identical surnames or in situations where only a person's forenames are used. But all birders will find much of interest in this fascinating volume, a book to dip into time and time again whenever their curiosity is aroused.

The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals

Author: Bo Beolens

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 592

View: 296

Just who was the Przewalski after whom Przewalski's horse was named? Or Husson, the eponym for the rat Hydromys hussoni? Or the Geoffroy whose name is forever linked to Geoffroy's cat? This unique reference provides a brief look at the real lives behind the scientific and vernacular mammal names one encounters in field guides, textbooks, journal articles, and other scholarly works. Arranged to mirror standard dictionaries, the more than 1,300 entries included here explain the origins of over 2,000 mammal species names. Each bio-sketch lists the scientific and common-language names of all species named after the person, outlines the individual's major contributions to mammalogy and other branches of zoology, and includes brief information about his or her mammalian namesake's distribution. The two appendixes list scientific and common names for ease of reference, and, where appropriate, individual entries include mammals commonly—but mistakenly—believed to be named after people. The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals is a highly readable and informative guide to the people whose names are immortalized in mammal nomenclature.

The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles

Author: Bo Beolens

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 296

View: 252

Who was Richard Kemp, after whom the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle is named? Is Wake’s Gecko named after Berkeley’s Marvalee Wake? Or perhaps her husband, David? Why do so many snakes and lizards have Werner in their name? This reference book answers these and thousands of other questions about the origins of the vernacular and scientific names of reptiles across the globe. From Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti, the Florida cottonmouth subspecies named for Roger Conant, to Xantusia, the night lizard genera namesake of John Xantus, this dictionary covers everyone after whom an extant or recently extinct reptile has been named. The entries include a brief bio-sketch, a list of the reptiles that bear the individual’s name, the names of reptiles erroneously thought to be associated with the person, and a summary of major—and sometimes obscure or even incidental—contributions made by the person to herpetology and zoology. An introductory chapter explains how to use the book and describes the process of naming taxa. Easy to use and filled with addictive—and highly useful—information about the people whose names will be carried into the future on the backs of the world’s reptiles, The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles is a handy and fun book for professional and amateur herpetologists alike.

The Eponym Dictionary of Amphibians

Author: Bo Beolens

Publisher: Pelagic Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 250

View: 240

New species of animal and plant are being discovered all the time. When this happens, the new species has to be given a scientific, Latin name in addition to any common, vernacular name. In either case the species may be named after a person, often the discoverer but sometimes an individual they wished to honour or perhaps were staying with at the time the discovery was made. Species names related to a person are ‘eponyms’. Many scientific names are allusive, esoteric and even humorous, so an eponym dictionary is a valuable resource for anyone, amateur or professional, who wants to decipher the meaning and glimpse the history of a species name. Sometimes a name refers not to a person but to a fictional character or mythological figure. The Forest Stubfoot Toad Atelopus farci is named after the FARC, a Colombian guerrilla army who found refuge in the toad’s habitat and thereby, it is claimed, protected it. Hoipollo's Bubble-nest Frog Pseudophilautus hoipolloi was named after the Greek for ‘the many’, but someone assumed the reference was to a Dr Hoipollo. Meanwhile, the man who has everything will never refuse an eponym: Sting's Treefrog Dendropsophus stingi is named after the rock musician, in honour of his ‘commitment and efforts to save the rainforest’. Following the success of their Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles, the authors have joined forces to give amphibians a similar treatment. They have tracked down 1,609 honoured individuals and composed for each a brief, pithy biography. In some cases these are a reminder of the courage of scientists whose dedicated research in remote locations exposed them to disease and even violent death. The eponym ensures that their memory will survive, aided by reference works such as this highly readable dictionary. Altogether 2,668 amphibians are listed.

Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names

Author: James A. Jobling

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 464

Many scientific bird names describe a bird's habits, habitat, distribution or a plumage feature, while others are named after their discoverers or in honour of prominent ornithologists. This extraordinary work of reference lists the generic and specific name for almost every species of bird in the world and gives its meaning and derivation. In the case of eponyms brief biographical details are provided for each of the personalities commemorated in the scientific names. This fascinating book is an outstanding source of information which will both educate and inform, and may even help to understand birds better.

Dictionary of Historical Allusions & Eponyms

Author: Dorothy Auchter

Publisher: Abc-Clio Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 773

Defines terms and phrases that refer to historical events or real and mythical people, including curfew, an Annie Oakley (meaning a free pass), dunce, flying colors, and maverick

Eponym Dictionary of Odonata

Author: Bo Beolens

Publisher: Whittles

ISBN:

Category: Entomologists

Page: 352

View: 613

Provides a listing of all those after whom damselflies and dragonflies have been named. Each entry is cross-referenced so the relationships between scientific authors, entomologists and others can be followed. Many entries have been contributed by the people honoured.

Sharks: An Eponym Dictionary

Author: Michael Watkins

Publisher: Pelagic Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 170

View: 281

This fascinating reference book delves into the origins of the vernacular and scientific names of sharks, rays, skates and chimeras. Each entry offers a concise biography, revealing the hidden stories and facts behind each species’ name.

A Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names

Author: James A. Jobling

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 334

This dictionary gives the derivation and meaning of all valid scientific bird names. Many fascinating details emerge from the author's meticulous work in tracking down obscure meanings. A short but very informative introduction explains the history and purposes of scientific nomenclature andthe basic features of Latin in this context. It also discusses the ways in which birds have been named for their appearance, for a person or place, or for some aspect of their habitat, behaviour, food, or voice, or with reference to their native-language name. There is a full bibliography at the endof the volume.Each part of the name is defined separately so that Passer domesticus, for example, will not be found as such, but both Passer and domesticus are explained in their respective alphabetical places. The usefulness of the Dictionary will thus not be affected by future taxonomic revisions of generic orspecies names. About 8500 names are defined, including a selection of historical synonyms.This book will find a permanent place on every ornithologist's shelf and will be a valuable reference source for everyone whose work or interests bring them into contact with birds.

CRC World Dictionary of Plant Nmaes

Common Names, Scientific Names, Eponyms, Synonyms, and Etymology

Author: Umberto Quattrocchi

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 696

View: 434

The 'CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names', a four volume set, is the most comprehensive work of its kind available today. The reader will find its coverage absorbing and useful. Umberto Quattrocchi, was awarded the prestigious Hanbury Botanical Garden Award for his studies on flowers and gardens.

Elsevier's Dictionary of Eponyms

Author:

Publisher: Elsevier Science Limited

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 295

View: 367

This dictionary containing more than 2,900 terms deriving from the names and pseudonyms of renowned, or seemingly unknown people, covers most fields of human development such as economy, science, technology, history, religion, culture, politics, sport and many others. The main aims of this dictionary are to provide professionals with a vast and updated compilation of the many eponymous forms used in English; to highlight the invaluable contribution of eponyms which enrich the vocabulary of the English language; to give succinct and accurate information on etymological aspects featuring the terms herein included and to show, by means of sample sentences and expressions mostly taken from original sources, how ubiquitous and unpredictable eponymic forms are.

The Emu

Official Organ of the Australasian Ornithologists' Union

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Birds

Page:

View: 504