The End of the World

Stories of the Apocalypse

Author: Martin H. Greenberg

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 328

View: 766

Collects a riveting array of doomsday stories by some of the top authors in the genre, including Neil Gaiman, George R. R. Martin, Arthur C. Clarke, Poul Anderson and many more. Original.

Wastelands

Stories of the Apocalypse

Author: John Joseph Adams

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 983

An anthology of post-apocalyptic short fiction from some of the biggest names in science fiction and speculative fiction - including Stephen King, George R. R. Martin and Orson Scott Card Famine, Death, War, and Pestilence: The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, the harbingers of Armageddon - these are our guides through the Wastelands . . . From the Book of Revelations to The Road Warrior; from A Canticle for Leibowitz to The Road, storytellers have long imagined the end of the world, weaving tales of catastrophe, chaos, and calamity. Gathering together the best post-apocalyptic literature of the last two decades from many of today's most renowned authors of speculative fiction, including George R.R. Martin, Gene Wolfe, Orson Scott Card, Carol Emshwiller, Jonathan Lethem, Octavia E. Butler, and Stephen King, Wastelands explores the scientific, psychological, and philosophical questions of what it means to remain human in the wake of Armageddon. Praise for Wastelands: 'Arguably my favorite anthology of all time - just packed with speculative masterworks' - Paul Goat Allen, Barnes & Noble.com 'A first-rate anthology that quite convincingly represents the more recent SFnal view of the apocalypse' - Locus 'I can't help but give this collection the highest recommendation. I think this will be a cornerstone for most reader's shelves' - SFFWorld 'A well-chosen selection of well-crafted stories, offering something to please nearly every postapocalyptic palate' - Booklist

Undead Ends

Stories of Apocalypse

Author: S. Trimble

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 622

Framing modern British and American apocalypse films as sites of interpretive struggle, Trimble argues that contemporary apocalypse films aren't so much envisioning The End of the world as the end of a particular world; not The End of humanness but, rather, the end of Man.

Wastelands 2 - More Stories of the Apocalypse

Author: John Joseph Adams

Publisher: Titan Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 528

View: 976

Wastelands 2 - More Stories of the Apocalypse is a new anthology of post-apocalyptic literature from some of the most renowned science fiction and fantasy authors in the field today including George R.R. Martin, Hugh Howey, Junot Diaz, David Brin and many more. It is an eclectic mix of tales that explores famine, death, war, pestilence, and harbingers of the biblical apocalypse.

The Cult at the End of the World

The Terrifying Story of the Aum Doomsday Cult, from the Subways of Tokyo to the Nuclear Arsenals of Russia

Author: David E. Kaplan

Publisher: Crown

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 310

View: 336

Examines the cult responsible for the Tokyo nerve gas attack

Is the End of the World Near?

From Crackpot Predictions to Scientific Scenarios

Author: Ron Miller

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 120

View: 550

Introduces end of the world scenarios, including self-destruction through nuclear war or continued environmental exploitation, humanity wiped out by a pandemic, or an asteroid or comet strike destroying Earth.

How to Survive the Apocalypse

Zombies, Cylons, Faith, and Politics at the End of the World

Author: Robert Joustra

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 208

View: 572

The world is going to hell. So begins this book, pointing to the prevalence of apocalypse -- cataclysmic destruction and nightmarish end-of-the-world scenarios -- in contemporary entertainment. In How to Survive the Apocalypse Robert Joustra and Alissa Wilkinson examine a number of popular stories -- from the Cylons in Battlestar Galactica to the purging of innocence in Game of Thrones to the hordes of zombies in The Walking Dead -- and argue that such apocalyptic stories reveal a lot about us here and now, about how we conceive of our life together, including some of our deepest tensions and anxieties. Besides analyzing the dsytopian shift in popular culture, Joustra and Wilkinson also suggest how Christians can live faithfully and with integrity in such a cultural context.

Thematic Guide to World Mythology

Author: Lorena Laura Stookey

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 469

Examines reoccurring themes and patterns in the mythologies of many ancient and modern cultures.

2012 and the End of the World

The Western Roots of the Maya Apocalypse

Author: Matthew Restall

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 130

Did the Maya really predict that the world would end in December of 2012? If not, how and why has 2012 millenarianism gained such popular appeal? In this deeply knowledgeable book, two leading historians of the Maya answer these questions in a succinct, readable, and accessible style. Matthew Restall and Amara Solari introduce, explain, and ultimately demystify the 2012 phenomenon. They begin by briefly examining the evidence for the prediction of the world's end in ancient Maya texts and images, analyzing precisely what Maya priests did and did not prophesize. The authors then convincingly show how 2012 millenarianism has roots far in time and place from Maya cultural traditions, but in those of medieval and Early Modern Western Europe. Revelatory any myth-busting, while remaining firmly grounded in historical fact, this fascinating book will be essential reading as the countdown to December 21, 2012, begins.

The Last Myth

What the Rise of Apocalyptic Thinking Tells Us About America

Author: Matthew Barrett Gross

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 846

During the first dozen years of the twenty-first century, apocalyptic anticipation in America has leapt from the cultish to the mainstream. Today, nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that the events foretold in the book of Revelation will come true. But many secular readers also seem hungry for catastrophe and have propelled books about peak oil, global warming, and the end of civilization into bestsellers. How did we come to live in a culture obsessed by the belief that the end is near? The Last Myth explains why apocalyptic beliefs are surging within the American mainstream today. Demonstrating that our expectation of the end of the world is a surprisingly recent development in human thought, the book reveals the profound influence of apocalyptic thinking on America’s past, present, and future.