The Emperor's Armies

Author: Chris Wraight

Publisher: Black Library

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 896

View: 513

Mighty armies clash as the Empire's greatest heroes must unite to defeat ruinous threats from both within and without.

In the Service of the Emperor

Essays on the Imperial Japanese Army

Author: Edward J. Drea

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 369

Japan?s war in Asia and the Pacific from 1937 to 1945 continues to be a subject of great interest, yet the wartime Japanese army remains little understood outside Japan. Most published accounts rely on English-language works written in the 1950s and 1960s. The Japanese-language sources have remained relatively inaccessible to Western scholars in part because of the difficulty of the language, a difficulty that Edward J. Drea, who reads Japanese, surmounts. In a series of searching examinations of the structure, ethos, and goals of the Japanese military establishment, Drea offers new material on its tactics, operations, doctrine, and leadership. Based on original military documents, official histories, court diaries, and Emperor Hirohito?s own words, these twelve essays introduce Western readers to fifty years of Japanese scholarship about the war and Japan?s military institutions. In addition, Drea uses recently declassified Allied intelligence documents related to Japan to challenge existing views and conventional wisdom about the war.

Leading the Roman Army

Soldiers and Emperors, 31 BC – 235 AD

Author: Jonathan Mark Eaton

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 911

The Roman imperial army represented one of the main factors in the exercise of political control by the emperors. The effective political management of the army was essential for maintaining the safety and well-being of the empire as a whole. This book analyses the means by which emperors controlled their soldiers and sustained their allegiance from the battle of Actium in 31 BC, to the demise of the Severan dynasty in AD 235. Recent discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of the Roman army. This study provides an up to date synthesis of a range of evidence from archaeological, epigraphic, literary and numismatic sources on the relationship between the emperor and his soldiers. It demonstrates that this relationship was of an intensely personal nature. He was not only the commander-in-chief, but also their patron and benefactor, even after their discharge from military service. Yet the management of the army was more complex than this emperor-soldier relationship suggests. An effective army requires an adequate military hierarchy to impose discipline and command the troops on a daily basis. This was of particular relevance for the imperial army which was mainly dispersed along the frontiers of the empire, effectively in a series of separate armies. The emperor needed to ensure the loyalty of his officers by building mutually beneficial relationships with them. In this way, the imperial army became a complex network of interlocking ties of loyalty which protected the emperor from military subversion.

Leading the Roman Army

Soldiers and Emperors, 31 BC – 235 AD

Author: Jonathan Mark Eaton

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 302

The Roman imperial army represented one of the main factors in the exercise of political control by the emperors. The effective political management of the army was essential for maintaining the safety and well-being of the empire as a whole. This book analyses the means by which emperors controlled their soldiers and sustained their allegiance from the battle of Actium in 31 BC, to the demise of the Severan dynasty in AD 235. Recent discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of the Roman army. This study provides an up to date synthesis of a range of evidence from archaeological, epigraphic, literary and numismatic sources on the relationship between the emperor and his soldiers. It demonstrates that this relationship was of an intensely personal nature. He was not only the commander-in-chief, but also their patron and benefactor, even after their discharge from military service. Yet the management of the army was more complex than this emperor-soldier relationship suggests. An effective army requires an adequate military hierarchy to impose discipline and command the troops on a daily basis. This was of particular relevance for the imperial army which was mainly dispersed along the frontiers of the empire, effectively in a series of separate armies. The emperor needed to ensure the loyalty of his officers by building mutually beneficial relationships with them. In this way, the imperial army became a complex network of interlocking ties of loyalty which protected the emperor from military subversion.

Army of the Roman Emperors

Archaeology and History

Author: Thomas Fischer

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: Military art and science

Page: 456

View: 568

Compared to modern standard, the Roman army of the imperial era was surprisingly small. However, when assessed in terms of their various tasks, they by far outstrip modern armies - acting not only as an armed power of the state in external and internal conflicts, but also carrying out functions which nowadays are performed by police, local government, customs and tax authorities, as well as constructing roads, ships, and buildings. With this opulent volume, Thomas Fischer presents a comprehensive and unique exploration of the Roman military of the imperial era. With over 600 illustrations, the costumes, weapons and equipment of the Roman army are explored in detail using archaeological finds dating from the late Republic to Late Antiquity, and from all over the Roman Empire. The buildings and fortifications associated with the Roman army are also discussed. By comparing conflicts, border security, weaponry and artefacts, the development of the army through time is traced. This work is intended for experts as well as to readers with a general interest in Roman history. It is also a treasure-trove for re-enactment groups, as it puts many common perceptions of the weaponry, equipment and dress of the Roman army to the test.

Napoleon Against Great Odds

The Emperor and the Defenders of France, 1814

Author: Ralph Ashby

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 656

This revisionist history offers a fresh analysis of Napoleon and the French army as they defended their empire against the massive Coalition invasion of 1814. * 20 drawings, engravings, and paintings, primarily from the 19th century * Maps depicting the invasion of France, Napoleon's 1814 campaign, and the Battle for Paris * Charts and tables examining some of the French regiments, including information regarding age, physical size, and civilian occupations of recruits * A bibliography of general works, monographs, and archival sources

Leading the Roman Army

Soldiers and Emperors, 31 Bc 235 Ad

Author: Jonathan Mark Eaton

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 695

The Roman imperial army represented one of the main factors in the exercise of political control by the emperors. The effective political management of the army was essential for maintaining the safety and well-being of the empire as a whole. This book analyses the means by which emperors controlled their soldiers and sustained their allegiance from the battle of Actium in 31 BC, to the demise of the Severan dynasty in AD 235.Recent discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of the Roman army. This study provides an up to date synthesis of a range of evidence from archaeological, epigraphic, literary and numismatic sources on the relationship between the emperor and his soldiers. It demonstrates that this relationship was of an intensely personal nature. He was not only the commander-in-chief, but also their patron and benefactor, even after their discharge from military service. Yet the management of the army was more complex than this emperor-soldier relationship suggests.An effective army requires an adequate military hierarchy to impose discipline and command the troops on a daily basis. This was of particular relevance for the imperial army which was mainly dispersed along the frontiers of the empire, effectively in a series of separate armies. The emperor needed to ensure the loyalty of his officers by building mutually beneficial relationships with them. In this way, the imperial army became a complex network of interlocking ties of loyalty which protected the emperor from military subversion.

In the Emperor's Service

Wallenstein's Army, 1625-1634

Author: Laurence Spring

Publisher: Century of the Soldier

ISBN:

Category: Armies

Page: 152

View: 249

Wallenstein! His very name is synonymous with the Thirty Years War. Despite his army being almost as infamous, very little has been written about it, especially in English. However, by using archives from record offices from Germany, Czechoslovakia (formerly Bohemia), Sweden and Britain as well as the latest archaeological evidence from mass graves

Campaigns of the Armies of France, in Prussia, Saxony, and Poland, Under the Command of His Majesty the Emperor and King, in MDCCCVI and VII

A Work Destined to Record the Great Events of that Memorable Era, and the Brilliant Achievements of the Generals, Officers, and Soldiers : Accompanied with Biographical Notices Upon Those who Fell During that Memorable Campaign : Also, with Historical and Military Details of the Sieges and Battles which Have Signalized the Different Countries, Through which the French Have Just Marched Their Armies

Author: Jacques Peuchet

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: France

Page:

View: 501

The Emperor and the Army in the Later Roman Empire, AD 235–395

Author: Mark Hebblewhite

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 429

With The Emperor and the Army in the Later Roman Empire, AD 235–395 Mark Hebblewhite offers the first study solely dedicated to examining the nature of the relationship between the emperor and his army in the politically and militarily volatile later Roman Empire. Bringing together a wide range of available literary, epigraphic and numismatic evidence he demonstrates that emperors of the period considered the army to be the key institution they had to mollify in order to retain power and consequently employed a range of strategies to keep the troops loyal to their cause. Key to these efforts were imperial attempts to project the emperor as a worthy general (imperator) and a generous provider of military pay and benefits. Also important were the honorific and symbolic gestures each emperor made to the army in order to convince them that they and the empire could only prosper under his rule.

Bolt Action: Armies of Imperial Japan

Author: Warlord Games

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 56

View: 563

Following the assault on Pearl Harbor, the Imperial Japanese military saw action across Asia, from the capture and defence of the islands of the Pacific to the occupation of territory in China and Burma. With this latest supplement for Bolt Action, players have all the information they need to build a force of the Emperor's fanatically loyal troops and campaign through some of the most brutal battles of the war.

The Terra Cotta Army

China's First Emperor and the Birth of a Nation

Author: John Man

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 887

The Terra Cotta Army is one of the greatest archaeological discoveries ever made. Over seven thousand life-size figures of warriors and horses were interred in the mausoleum of the first emperor of China—and each figure was individually carved. Weaving together history and a first-hand account of his experiences in China, John Man tells the fascinating story of how and why these astonishing figures were created in the third century BC, and how they have become a symbol of China's history, culture, and society.

AD69

Emperors, Armies and Anarchy

Author: Nic Fields

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 391

The author of God’s Viking brings to life “a period in Roman history that provides many twists and turns as Rome emerged from the period of rule by Nero” (Firetrench). With the death of Nero by his own shaky hand, the ill-sorted, ill-starred Julio-Claudian dynasty came to an ignominious end, and Rome was up for the taking. This was 9 June, AD 68. The following year, commonly known as the “Year of the Four Emperors,” was probably one of Rome’s worst. In all previous successions, the new emperor had some relation to his predecessor, but the psychotic and paranoid Nero had done away with any eligible relatives. The new emperor had to secure his legal position and authority with regards to the Senate and to the army, as well as to those who had a vested interest in the system, the Praetorian Guard. Because imperial authority was ultimately based on control of the military, a player in the game of thrones had to gain an unshakable command over the legions. Of course, this in turn meant that the soldiers themselves could impose their own choice. It was to take a tumultuous year of civil war and the death of three imperial candidates before a fourth candidate could come out on top, remain there, and establish for himself a new dynasty. Nic Fields narrates the twists and turns and the military events of this short but bloody period of Roman history. “We appear to meet more people than the cast of Game of Thrones (with about the same mortality rate!) but with the added bonus of this being history, not fiction . . . hugely entertaining.”—Miniature Wargames Magazine

Blade of the North

Author: H A Jones

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 378

View: 980

Nation after nation has fallen to the invading armies of Emperor Tigranik. When the Emperor's army threatens the city of Tolos, sixteen-year-old Sara Fairgrey flees with her friends in a desperate search for help. But Sara knows there is only thing that will end the war and save her father, trapped inside Tolos - the death of the Emperor.

The Emperor Commodus

God and Gladiator

Author: John S. McHugh

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 340

Commodus is synonymous with debauchery and megalomania, best remembered for fighting as a gladiator. Ridiculed and maligned by historians since his own time, modern popular culture knows him as the patricidal villain in Ridley Scott's Gladiator. Much of his infamy is clearly based on fact, but is this the full story?John McHugh reviews the ancient evidence to present the first full-length biography of Commodus in English. His twelve-year reign is set in its historical context, showing that the 'kingdom of gold' he supposedly inherited was actually an empire devastated by plague and war. Openly autocratic, Commodus compromised the privileges and vested interests of the senatorial clique, who therefore plotted to murder him. Surviving repeated conspiracies only convinced Commodus that he was under divine protection, increasingly identifying himself as Hercules reincarnate. This and his antics in the arena allowed his senatorial enemies to present Commodus as a mad tyrant to justify his murder, which they finally succeeded in arranging by having him strangled by a wrestler.

Emperor Hirohito and the Pacific War

Author: Noriko Kawamura

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 271

This reexamination of the controversial role Emperor Hirohito played during the Pacific War gives particular attention to the question: If the emperor could not stop Japan from going to war with the Allied Powers in 1941, why was he able to play a crucial role in ending the war in 1945? Drawing on previously unavailable primary sources, Noriko Kawamura traces Hirohito�s actions from the late 1920s to the end of the war, analyzing the role Hirohito played in Japan�s expansion. Emperor Hirohito emerges as a conflicted man who struggled throughout the war to deal with the undefined powers bestowed upon him as a monarch, often juggling the contradictory positions and irreconcilable differences advocated by his subordinates. Kawamura shows that he was by no means a pacifist, but neither did he favor the reckless wars advocated by Japan�s military leaders.

The Emperor and the Army in the Later Roman Empire, AD 235–395

Author: Mark Hebblewhite

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 710

With The Emperor and the Army in the Later Roman Empire, AD 235–395 Mark Hebblewhite offers the first study solely dedicated to examining the nature of the relationship between the emperor and his army in the politically and militarily volatile later Roman Empire. Bringing together a wide range of available literary, epigraphic and numismatic evidence he demonstrates that emperors of the period considered the army to be the key institution they had to mollify in order to retain power and consequently employed a range of strategies to keep the troops loyal to their cause. Key to these efforts were imperial attempts to project the emperor as a worthy general (imperator) and a generous provider of military pay and benefits. Also important were the honorific and symbolic gestures each emperor made to the army in order to convince them that they and the empire could only prosper under his rule.