The Egyptian Book of the Dead

Author: John Romer

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 992

View: 490

The Book of the Dead is a unique collection of funerary texts from a wide variety of sources, dating from the fifteenth to the fourth century BC. Consisting of spells, prayers and incantations, each section contains the words of power to overcome obstacles in the afterlife. The papyruses were often left in sarcophagi for the dead to use as passports on their journey from burial, and were full of advice about the ferrymen, gods and kings they would meet on the way. Offering valuable insights into ancient Egypt, The Book of the Dead has also inspired fascination with the occult and the afterlife in recent years.

Decoding the Butterfly Promise

Regaining Our Sacred Power.

Author: Dr. Gail Siler, PhD

Publisher: Balboa Press

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 374

View: 919

Haunted by an urgent voice she hears each time she reads a book by Carlos Castaneda, Gail seeks out Castaneda’s apprentice, and she finds herself catapulted into a strange world of shamans, metaphysics, and ancient beings. She is thrust forward onto a dangerous path that takes her from the safety of her everyday world into the radiant landscape where true power lives. Here, she is introduced to an ancient couple, who have lived and loved beyond time itself. She offers up her heart to become a co-conspirator with them in an unbelievable task. She must journey into the ancient records and retrieve the knowledge that broke this ancient couple and humanity itself apart. The death-bed promise this ancient couple made to each other eons ago is also the key to humanity’s own resurrection. It is this—the Butterfly Promise—that will return us to our true powers and to our wholeness once again.

The Penguin Book of Myths & Legends of Ancient Egypt

Author: Joyce Tyldesley

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 717

'This readable anthology is a good introduction to a civilization that fascinates like few others . . . in this book there are animals who talk, princesses who are locked up at the top of towers, wicked stepmothers and many other themes . . . An enjoyable book by a skilled author' Financial Times The civilization we know as Ancient Egypt stretched over three thousand years. What was life like for ancient Egyptians? What were their beliefs - and how different were they from ours? The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt uses Egypt's vivid narratives to create a panorama of its history, from the earliest settlers to the time of Cleopatra. Gathered from pyramid texts, archaeological finds and contemporary documents, these stories cover everything from why the Nile flooded annually to Egyptian beliefs about childbirth and what happened after death. They show us what life was really like for rich and poor, man and woman, farmer and pharaoh, bringing a long-dead culture back to life. 'By painstakingly analysing the myths, Tyldesley endeavours to get under the skin of Egyptian life, and meets the unsung characters of Egyptian history' The Times 'As panoramic a survey as one could hope to read' Tom Holland, Observer

In Search of Myths & Heroes

Exploring Four Epic Legends of the World

Author: Michael Wood

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 335

The author goes in search of four of the most famous myths in the world--Shangri-la, Jason and the Golden Fleece, the Queen of Sheba, and the Holy Grail--journeying to some of the most remote regions on Earth, including Western Tibet, the mountains of Geo

Experience Personal Fulfillment and Achieve Your Life?s Destiny

Author: James Anderson Charleson

Publisher: LifeRich Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 360

View: 1000

In Experience Personal Fulfillment and Achieve Your Life's Destiny, author James Anderson Charleson reveals the deep lessons and connections between nature, the science of quantum physics, and the psychic sources of ancient mystical wisdom. Through these connections, you can find and express your unique material strengths, emotional appeal, intellectual brilliance, and spiritual inspiration. Charleson shows you how to awaken the essence of your being and create the vision necessary to defining your life. You can learn how to take action and how to move toward that vision. You'll find out how to seek others to bring your dream to life. When you blend sympathy with nature, you can develop the discipline to increase your strength and listen to your inner voice to explore your spirit. When you achieve mastery over your life, you can transmute your energies for refinement and participate in the crowning glory of creation. Experience Personal Fulfillment and Achieve Your Life's Destiny expands the vision to include a wider variety of strengths readily available to you, strengths that were called on by the ancient sages and mystics as they climbed the tree of life. By using their examples, you, too, can reach the pinnacle of what you can become and improve the world.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead

A Biography

Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 149

The Tibetan Book of the Dead is the most famous Buddhist text in the West, having sold more than a million copies since it was first published in English in 1927. Carl Jung wrote a commentary on it, Timothy Leary redesigned it as a guidebook for an acid trip, and the Beatles quoted Leary's version in their song "Tomorrow Never Knows." More recently, the book has been adopted by the hospice movement, enshrined by Penguin Classics, and made into an audiobook read by Richard Gere. Yet, as acclaimed writer and scholar of Buddhism Donald Lopez writes, "The Tibetan Book of the Dead is not really Tibetan, it is not really a book, and it is not really about death." In this compelling introduction and short history, Lopez tells the strange story of how a relatively obscure and malleable collection of Buddhist texts of uncertain origin came to be so revered--and so misunderstood--in the West. The central character in this story is Walter Evans-Wentz (1878-1965), an eccentric scholar and spiritual seeker from Trenton, New Jersey, who, despite not knowing the Tibetan language and never visiting the country, crafted and named The Tibetan Book of the Dead. In fact, Lopez argues, Evans-Wentz's book is much more American than Tibetan, owing a greater debt to Theosophy and Madame Blavatsky than to the lamas of the Land of Snows. Indeed, Lopez suggests that the book's perennial appeal stems not only from its origins in magical and mysterious Tibet, but also from the way Evans-Wentz translated the text into the language of a very American spirituality.

African People in World History

Author: John Henrik Clarke

Publisher: Black Classic Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 92

View: 562

African history as world history: Africa and the Roman Empire -- Africa and the rise of Islam -- The mighty kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, and Songhay -- The Atlantic slave trade: Slavery and resistance in South America and the Caribbean -- Slavery and resistance in the United States -- African Americans in the twentieth century.

Man, Know Thyself

Volume 1 Corrective Knowledge of Our Notable Ancestors

Author: Rick Duncan

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 543

View: 738

‘Man, Know Thyself’ is perhaps one of the world’s oldest and most important sayings. This adage was originally coined by Imhotep the world’s first multi-genius and perhaps the greatest creative mortal individual who ever lived. Imhotep lived over five and a half thousand years ago from our present age. It must be said immediately that Imhotep was an African. He is among our first Notable Ancestors. Considering Imhotep’s instruction, it means that as individuals, as a family, collectively as a people, a community, a society or a nation, we should know ourselves; that is, who we are. This includes knowledge of who spawned us, where we have been and where we currently are. Knowing this, as our Notable Ancestor and Grandmaster Teacher (Baba) Dr John Henrik Clarke has said, will tell us who we are and where we must get to. Who we are is dependent on who we were. Who we were should determine who we should be. To emphasise the point, Marcus Garvey, another of our most important Notable Ancestors, frequently reiterated this advice when he reminded us that our first obligation is to know ourselves. He told us that we should make our knowledge about us so complete so as to make it impossible for others to take advantage of us. He told us that in order to know ourselves we must know who our Ancestors were and what they achieved. We would then realize who we are and what we are capable of achieving. This is the meaning of the African adage and Sankofa symbol of ‘looking back in order to go forward’. The importance of knowing our ancestors has been summed up in an old Native American saying that ‘It is the spirit of our ancestors that should guide our path’. There is a sense however that Africans have forgotten our ancestors. Because of this, there is no ‘spirit’ to guide us and so Africans are lost and confused. The roots of African spirituality and culture have been made redundant. Yet as Dr Clarke points out, the unbilicord that tied Africans to our spiritual and cultural roots have only been stretched. It has never been broken. It is for Africans to come to this realization and to rediscover the spirit of our ancestors. This volume lists some of our Notable Ancestors in the hope that knowledge about them and their achievements will aid some of us in understanding where we have been, who we presently are and consequently who we must become. Ultimately, it is hoped that we may use this knowledge to reconnect with the spirit of our Ancestors and let them be our guide. This volume is based on the ‘truth’ about Africans and therefore correcting what is ‘told’ about us. This ‘corrective knowledge’ of us is important because as Imhotep said; ‘Know the truth and the truth shall set you free’. This means being free to interpret our own story and to define who we are. This is crucial because although ‘history’ is a witness to the truths, ‘history’ has been ‘stolen’ by others who have hidden the truths about us. ‘History’ has never been true or kind to Africans and therefore it cannot tell us about us. Yet as Peter Tosh intimated, we cannot come to a consciousness of ourselves, of who we are, if we do not know the truths about us. ‘History’ has been described as the ‘Queen’ of the academic subjects. So important is History that it is said that ‘whoever controls history, controls the future’. In one sense education in general and history in particular is about teaching us who we are. History teaches who we are so as to help us to know where we belong in our community (or society). Africans cannot know where we belong in society however, because our story has been told by ‘others’ (those who ‘own history’). Africans are therefore unaware of who we are because what is ‘known’ about us is not the truth about us. The story of Africans, the oldest people on earth, like the history of the world, is taught by ‘others’. Yet these others came into the world thousands of years after Africans had already established great civ

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

Author: Sarah Tarlow

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 872

View: 839

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.