The Economics of Poverty

History, Measurement, and Policy

Author: Martin Ravallion

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 720

View: 208

While there is no denying that the world has made huge progress against absolute poverty over the last 200 years, until recent times the bulk of that progress had been made in wealthy countries only. The good news is that we have seen greater progress against poverty in the developing world in recent times-indeed, a faster pace of progress against extreme poverty than the rich world saw over a period of 100 years or more of economic development. However, continuing progress is far from assured. High and rising inequality has stalled progress against poverty in many countries. We are seeing generally rising relative poverty in the rich world as a whole over recent decades. And even in the developing world, there has been less progress in reaching the poorest, who risk being left behind, and a great many people in the emerging middle class remain highly vulnerable to falling back into poverty. The Economics of Poverty strives to support well-informed efforts to put in place effective policies to assure continuing success in reducing poverty in all its dimensions. The book reviews critically the past and present debates on the central policy issues of economic development everywhere. How much poverty is there? Why does poverty exist? What can be done to eliminate poverty? Martin Ravallion provides an accessible new synthesis of current knowledge on these issues. It does not assume that readers know economics already. Those new to economics get a lot of help along the way in understanding its concepts and methods. Economics lives though its relevance to real world problems, and here the problem of global poverty is both the central focus and a vehicle for learning.

The Economics of Poverty and Discrimination

Author: Bradley R. Schiller

Publisher: Englewood Cliffs, N.J. : Prentice-Hall

ISBN:

Category: Discrimination

Page: 241

View: 962

Top Notch, a dynamic 6-level course for international communication, sets a new standard, using the natural language that people really speak. With a rock-solid learner-centered approach, Top Notch provides students an opportunity to confirm their own progress at the end of every easy-to-teach two-page lesson. Features of Top Notch Fundamentals Essential model conversations that make key social language unforgettable and easy to personalize Intensive vocabulary development with active recycling Complete grammar support extended by a bound-in Vocabulary Booster "Top Notch Interactions" unique step-by-step discussion builders that guarantee success for all learners Thorough attention to pronunciation A wide array of learning strategies and activities that promote critical thinking Authentic and refreshing content that connects students to the real world

The Economics of Poverty

Author: Richard Perlman

Publisher: New York ; Montréal : McGraw-Hill

ISBN:

Category: Economic assistance, Domestic

Page: 240

View: 407

The Economics of Poverty

Author: Kevin Furey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 398

View: 132

2019 edition (1.1)

The Economics of Poverty Traps

Author: Christopher B. Barrett

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 703

What circumstances or behaviors turn poverty into a cycle that perpetuates across generations? The answer to this question carries especially important implications for the design and evaluation of policies and projects intended to reduce poverty. Yet a major challenge analysts and policymakers face in understanding poverty traps is the sheer number of mechanisms—not just financial, but also environmental, physical, and psychological—that may contribute to the persistence of poverty all over the world. The research in this volume explores the hypothesis that poverty is self-reinforcing because the equilibrium behaviors of the poor perpetuate low standards of living. Contributions explore the dynamic, complex processes by which households accumulate assets and increase their productivity and earnings potential, as well as the conditions under which some individuals, groups, and economies struggle to escape poverty. Investigating the full range of phenomena that combine to generate poverty traps—gleaned from behavioral, health, and resource economics as well as the sociology, psychology, and environmental literatures—chapters in this volume also present new evidence that highlights both the insights and the limits of a poverty trap lens. The framework introduced in this volume provides a robust platform for studying well-being dynamics in developing economies.

Economics of Poverty

Author: Debesh Bhowmik

Publisher: Deep and Deep Publications

ISBN:

Category: Economic development

Page: 356

View: 275

With special reference to India.

The Economics of Inequality, Discrimination, Poverty, and Mobility

Author: Robert S. Rycroft

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 408

View: 237

If there was any question before, there is no longer a question today: inequality, discrimination, poverty, and mobility are prominent national issues. The notion of "The American Dream" has been sold to generations of young Americans as the idea that working hard and following your dreams will allow you to break through any barriers in your path and inevitably lead to success. However, recent findings on inequality, discrimination, poverty, and mobility show that "The American Reality" is very different. The second edition of this introductory-level text brings together the essential materials on what economists have to say about these findings and brings students up to date with current thinking. It covers several ground-shattering events, such as: the election of Barack Obama followed by Donald Trump; the passage of the Affordable Care Act and attempts to repeal it; and the publication of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, among many others. With an emphasis on data, theory, and policy, this book tackles these issues by exploring three key questions in each chapter: What do the data tell us about what has been happening to the American economy? What are the economic theories needed to understand what has been happening? What are the policy ideas and controversies associated with these economic problems? Key controversies are highlighted in each chapter to drive classroom discussion, and end-of-chapter questions develop student understanding. This clearly written text is ideally suited to a wide variety of courses on contemporary economic conditions, inequality, and social economics in the United States.

Poor Economics

A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty

Author: Abhijit Banerjee

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 823

Why do the poor borrow to save? Why do they miss out on free life-saving immunizations, but pay for unnecessary drugs? In Poor Economics, Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, two practical visionaries working toward ending world poverty, answer these questions from the ground. In a book the Wall Street Journal called “marvelous, rewarding,” the authors tell how the stress of living on less than 99 cents per day encourages the poor to make questionable decisions that feed—not fight—poverty. The result is a radical rethinking of the economics of poverty that offers a ringside view of the lives of the world's poorest, and shows that creating a world without poverty begins with understanding the daily decisions facing the poor.

The Economics of Money, Poverty and Wealth and What We Should Do about It - First Ideas Edition

Author: Colin Richard Webb

Publisher: Colin Richard Webb

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 84

View: 633

Bringing a fresh and original outlook to the problem of poverty in our world, the aim of the author is to explain how by seeing the Economics of Money as a mathematical operation in each transaction, and by seeing money as an ancient tool we need to improve, we can move towards a different approach to economics and the mathematics of money to solve poverty around the world and in the process bring greater wealth to all.

The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Poverty

Author: Philip N. Jefferson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 849

View: 719

This Handbook examines poverty measurement, anti-poverty policy and programs, and poverty theory from the perspective of economics. It is written in a highly accessible style that encourages critical thinking about poverty. What's known about the sources of poverty and its alleviation are summarized and conventional thinking about poverty is challenged.

The Economics of Poverty and Inequality

Author: Frank A. Cowell

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Income distribution

Page: 1360

View: 652

This two-volume collection focuses on the economics of distributional equity and the way general criteria for comparisons of income-distribution can be used to inform the analysis of inequality and poverty. The issues addressed include: the nature of general ranking rules for comparing economic states based on simple ethical principles; the close relationship between the analysis of poverty and that of inequality and social welfare; the structure and properties of inequality and poverty indices.

The Persistence of Poverty

Why the Economics of the Well-off Can't Help the Poor

Author: Charles Karelis

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 209

Why hasn't the poverty rate fallen in four decades, despite society's massive and varied efforts? The notable philosopher Charles Karelis contends that conventional explanations of poverty rest on a mistake. And so do the antipoverty policies they generate. This book proposes a new explanation of the behaviors that keep people poor, including nonwork, quitting school, nonsaving, and breaking the law. Provocative and thoughtful, it finds a hidden rationality in the problematic conduct of many poor people, a rationality long missed by economists. Using science, history, fables, philosophical analysis, and common observation, the author engages us and takes us to a deeper grasp of the link between consumption and satisfaction, and from there to a new view of distributive justice and to fresh policy recommendations for combating poverty. With this bold work and original insights, the long-stalled campaign against poverty can begin to move forward once more.

Wealth and Poverty

A New Edition for the Twenty-First Century

Author: George Gilder

Publisher: Regnery Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 173

Hailed as "the guide to capitalism," this bestseller is one of the most famous economic books of all time and has sold more than one million copies since its first release.

Poor Economics

A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty

Author: Abhijit Banerjee

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 515

The winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics upend the most common assumptions about how economics works in this gripping and disruptive portrait of how poor people actually live. Why do the poor borrow to save? Why do they miss out on free life-saving immunizations, but pay for unnecessary drugs? In Poor Economics, Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, two award-winning MIT professors, answer these questions based on years of field research from around the world. Called "marvelous, rewarding" by the Wall Street Journal, the book offers a radical rethinking of the economics of poverty and an intimate view of life on 99 cents a day. Poor Economics shows that creating a world without poverty begins with understanding the daily decisions facing the poor.