The Duke, the Longhorns, and Chairman Mao

John Wayne's Political Odyssey

Author: Steven Travers

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 496

1966. The year of change. The year of division. The middle of the 1960s, the great dividing line between what America had been, and what it became. All of it, in all its color, glory, and ugliness, came symbolically together on a hot, humid weekend in Austin, Texas. The protagonist? None other John “Duke” Wayne, the larger-than-life movie hero of countless Westerns and war dramas; a swashbuckling, ruggedly macho idol of America; the very embodiment of what the United States had become—the new Rome: the most powerful military, political, and cultural empire in the annals of mankind. Wayne, like the nation itself, stood astride the world in Colossus style, talking tough. Taking no prisoners. In September 1966, John Wayne was in Texas filming War Wagon while the integrated Trojans of the University of Southern California arrived in Austin to do battle with a powerhouse of equal stature, the all-white Texas Longhorns. The Duke, a one-time pulling guard for coach Howard Jones at USC, was there, accompanied by sycophants, and according to rumor, with spurs on. Wayne arrived in Austin the night before the game. Dressed to the nines, he immediately repaired to the hotel bar. He had a full entourage who hung on his every word as if uttered from the Burning Bush. So it was when the Duke ordered his first whiskey. Thus surrounded by sycophants, John Wayne bellowed opinions, bromides, and pronouncements. What happened next is subject to interpretation, for this weekend and many other details of the Duke’s “Trojan wars” are revealed and expounded upon by longtime USC historian Steven Travers. This book is a fly-on-the-wall exploration of this wild weekend and an immersion into the John Wayne mythology: his politics, his inspirations, the plots to assassinate him, his connections to Stalin, Khrushchev, and Chairman Mao, and the death of the Western.

Coppola's Monster Film

The Making of Apocalypse Now

Author: Steven Travers

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 309

In 1975, after his two Godfather epics, Francis Ford Coppola went to the Philippines to film Apocalypse Now. He scrapped much of the original script, a jingoistic narrative of U.S. Special Forces winning an unwinnable war. Harvey Keitel, originally cast in the lead role, was fired and replaced by Martin Sheen, who had a heart attack. An overweight Marlon Brando, paid a huge salary, did more philosophizing than acting. It rained almost every day and a hurricane wiped out the set. The Philippine government promised the use of helicopters but diverted them at the last minute to fight communist and Muslim separatists. Coppola filmed for four years with no ending in the script. The shoot threatened to be the biggest disaster in movie history. Providing a detailed snapshot of American cinema during the Vietnam War, this book tells the story of how Apocalypse Now became one of the great films of all time.

Adventures with a Historian

The Life and Times of John "Jack" R. Hubbard

Author: John R Hubbard

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 612

View: 252

Riveting. Fascinating reading providing unique historical, cultural, and global insights into major 20th Century events - Hitler's Youth, the Battles of Okinawa and Iwo Jima, the Cold War, the turbulent 70s, India's rising importance, the role of government in higher education - and more. A must read for anyone seeking to understand classical liberal arts' essential role in the development of exceptional communication, critical thinking, and analytical skills sought after by today's elite employers. --Dr. Michael J. Savoie, Dean, College of Technology and Computing, Utah Valley University Jack Hubbard's life reads like an adventure novel; a fast-paced history of a man and a country back when great men walked the Earth. --Steven R. Travers, author of The Duke, The Longhorns, and Chairman Mao Jack Hubbard was an important figure in Southern California. He was brilliant and funny and a great leader, and all that comes alive in this book. I loved the man, and I'm glad he will be remembered in these pages. --John Robinson, Head Football Coach (Retired), University of Southern California Dr. John R. "Jack" Hubbard's leadership inspired USC's rapid advance throughout the 1970s, and in those pivotal 10 years, the university completely transformed itself. --C. L. Max Nikias, President, University of Southern California Dr. Hubbard was a giant man who cared deeply about the education of his students. --Charles "Tree" Young, USC All-American Receiver, NFL (retired) Wonderful book! I love the Stanford band story and the post Missouri "jock" rally story. Jack hired me in 1970 and he was a good friend and supporter of the Trojan Marching Band. Jack, John Robinson, and Bob Fleur - all great Trojans - were a big part of the Trojan family. --Dr. Arthur C. Bartner, Director, University of Southern California Trojan Marching Band

TV Guide

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Television programs

Page:

View: 828

Live Stock Journal

Studs, Herds & Flocks Illustrated Annual

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Livestock

Page:

View: 867

Directory

Author: American College of Physicians

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Medicine

Page:

View: 788

Dyott's Diary, 1781-1845

A Selection from the Journal of William Dyott, Sometime General in the British Army and Aide-de-camp to His Majesty King George III.

Author: William Dyott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 440

View: 711

This is the second in a two-volume work that encompasses the writings of William Dycott, a general in the King's army. The journal sheds light on some of the most fascinating years in 18th- and 19th-century English history.