The Dramatic Portrait

The Art of Crafting Light and Shadow

Author: Chris Knight

Publisher: Rocky Nook, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 240

View: 891

Without light, there is no photograph. As almost every photographer knows, the word “photograph” has its roots in two Greek words that, together, mean “drawing with light.” But what is less commonly acknowledged and understood is the role that shadow plays in creating striking, expressive imagery, especially in portraiture. It is through deft, nuanced use of both light and shadow that you can move beyond shooting simply ordinary, competent headshots into the realm of creating dramatic portraiture that can so powerfully convey a subject’s inner essence, communicate a personal narrative, and express your photographic vision.

In The Dramatic Portrait: The Art of Crafting Light and Shadow, Chris Knight addresses portraiture with a unique approach to both light and shadow that allows you to improve and elevate your own portraiture. He begins with the history of portraiture, from the early work of Egyptians and Greeks to the sublime treatment of light and subject by artists such as Caravaggio, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Chris then dives into a deep, hands-on exploration of light, shadow, and portraiture, offering numerous lessons and takeaways. He covers:

    • The qualities of light: hard, soft, and the spectrum in between
    • The relationships between light, subject, and background, and how to control them
    • Lighting patterns such as Paramount, Rembrandt, loop, and split
    • Lighting ratios and how they affect contrast in your image
    • Equipment: from big and small modifiers to grids, snoots, barn doors, flags, and gels
    • Multiple setups for portrait shoots, including those that utilize one, two, and three lights
    • How color contributes to drama and mood, eliciting an emotional response from the viewer
    • How to approach styling your portrait, from wardrobe to background
    • The post-processing workflow, including developing the RAW file, maximizing contrast, color grading, retouching, and dodging and burning for heightened drama and effect
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    • How all of these elements culminate to help you define your personal style and create your own narrative

Lighting and the Dramatic Portrait: The Art of Celebrity and Editorial Photography

Author: Michael Grecco

Publisher: Visualist Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 275

View: 501

Renowned celebrity photographer Michael Grecco’s seminal bestselling book "Lighting and the Dramatic Portrait: The Art of Celebrity and Editorial Photography" is a photographers "lighting “bible". A must-have for portrait photographers, Grecco reveals step-by-step every aspect of his craft including exact diagrams for perfect lighting while inspiring the true art of the portrait. You’ll learn exactly why "Time," "People," and "Business Week" and celebrities such as Chris Rock, Salma Hayek, Kate Winslet, and Lucy Liu all trust Michael Grecco to shoot their coveted celebrity covers. Grecco's beautiful, insightful work is all around us--on movie posters, in advertising, on magazine covers, everywhere. “I delight in inspiring people,” he writes. “I want them to stop, think, and feel.” Now Grecco shares the secrets of great portraits with photographers at every level, in "Lighting and the Dramatic Portrait." Sections on cameras, illumination, film and digital, creativity and conceptualization, connecting with the subject, and having a point of view, plus intriguing case studies that show “how I got that picture,” make this book a resource photographers will use again and again through the years. Whether the subject is a star or a soccer mom, Grecco shows how to add artistry, drama, wit, humor, and personality to their portrait.

Dramatic Character in the English Romantic Age

Author: Joseph W. Donohue Jr.

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 448

View: 300

This was the age of the star. For the first time in the history of the theater, the playwright took second place to the actor; the interpretation of the role assumed primary importance in a assessing a performance. It was Mr. Kean's Hamlet first, and Mr. Shakespeare's second. What effects did this highly subjective, interpretive emphasis have on the drama? Where did it originate and how did it evolve? These questions are considered at length in the author's analysis of the nature of Romanticism itself as revealed in essays, novels, criticism, and by the actors themselves. The Jacobean origins of this revolutionary period are reviewed, followed by a close scrutiny of the critical writing of such contemporary thinkers as Hazlitt, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats. This entirely new concept provides an important link between the practical theater and the contemporary philosophical thought of the time. Originally published in 1970. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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A Dramatic Portrait

Author: Terence Mervyn Rattigan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 127

View: 861

Dramatic Portraits

Author: Percival Presland Howe

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English drama

Page: 263

View: 297