The Doctor Who Franchise

American Influence, Fan Culture and the Spinoffs

Author: Lynnette Porter

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 200

View: 807

As Doctor Who nears its 50th anniversary, it is very much a part of British popular culture, and the Doctor has become a British icon. Nevertheless, thanks to BBC America and BBC Worldwide’s marketing strategy, as well as the Doctor’s and his companions’ recent in-person visits to the U.S., the venerable series is becoming more susceptible to an “American influence,” including the possibility of becoming “Americanized.” Doctor Who and recent spinoffs Torchwood and The Sarah Jane Adventures offer American audiences very different insights into the Whoniverse and have met with varying degrees of success. Whereas Torchwood became a U.S.-U.K. co-production, The Sarah Jane Adventures was largely mismarketed. To complicate matters, the interrelationships that keep the Doctor Who franchise alive through radio dramas, audiobooks, comics, novels, etc., during hiatuses in television broadcasts, may give U.S. and U.K. audiences different understandings of the lead characters—the Doctor, Captain Jack Harkness, and Sarah Jane Smith. Although the past decade has been an exciting time in the Whoniverse, the Doctor—and the franchise—are poised for yet another regeneration.

Doctor Who-Guide 1/3

Author: compiled from Wikipedia pages and published by Dr Googelberg

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 763

Dancing with the Doctor

Dimensions of Gender in the Doctor Who Universe

Author: Lorna Jowett

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 621

Widespread conversations and criticisms continue about the ways in which Doctor Who represents gender. Dancing with the Doctor, the first book on the Doctor Who universe to take gender as its focus, examines both the successful revival of the series since 2005 and its spin-off series, Torchwood and The Sarah Jane Adventures. Lorna Jowett delves into the distinctive stories and characters, including the Doctors themselves, their female and male companions, Captain Jack Harkness, Missy, Sarah Jane and her young comrades. She considers the showrunners, directors, producers and writers and the problems this flagship science fiction series has had in offering alternative gender models. Constructions of masculinity, the author function, and how gender intersects with the other facets of identity, race, ethnicity and age, are just some of the areas explored in this accessible and wide-ranging re-view of these hotly debated elements of the successful BBC franchise.

The Language of Doctor Who

From Shakespeare to Alien Tongues

Author: Jason Barr

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 298

View: 850

The BBC television series Doctor Who has been a cherished cornerstone of science fiction for five decades. This edited collection provides critical analyses of the series, connecting popular culture and academia through its exploration of the rich intersection of language, literature, and text in Doctor Who. Essays delve into a wide range of topics, from semantics to fandom and the power of the written word.

Production Studies

Cultural Studies of Media Industries

Author: Vicki Mayer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 763

"Behind-the-scenes" stories of ranting directors, stingy producers, temperamental actors, and the like have fascinated us since the beginnings of film and television. Today, magazines, websites, television programs, and DVDs are devoted to telling tales of trade lore—from on-set antics to labor disputes. The production of media has become as storied and mythologized as the content of the films and TV shows themselves. Production Studies is the first volume to bring together a star-studded cast of interdisciplinary media scholars to examine the unique cultural practices of media production. The all-new essays collected here combine ethnographic, sociological, critical, material, and political-economic methods to explore a wide range of topics, from contemporary industrial trends such as new media and niche markets to gender and workplace hierarchies. Together, the contributors seek to understand how the entire span of "media producers"—ranging from high-profile producers and directors to anonymous stagehands and costume designers—work through professional organizations and informal networks to form communities of shared practices, languages, and cultural understandings of the world. This landmark collection connects the cultural activities of media producers to our broader understanding of media practices and texts, establishing an innovative and agenda-setting approach to media industry scholarship for the twenty-first century. Contributors: Miranda J. Banks, John T. Caldwell, Christine Cornea, Laura Grindstaff, Felicia D. Henderson, Erin Hill, Jane Landman, Elana Levine, Amanda D. Lotz, Paul Malcolm, Denise Mann, Vicki Mayer, Candace Moore, Oli Mould, Sherry B. Ortner, Matt Stahl, John L. Sullivan, Serra Tinic, Stephen Zafirau

Storyworlds Across Media

Toward a Media-Conscious Narratology

Author: Marie-Laure Ryan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 400

View: 851

The proliferation of media and their ever-increasing role in our daily life has produced a strong sense that understanding mediaOCoeverything from oral storytelling, literary narrative, newspapers, and comics to radio, film, TV, and video gamesOCois key to understanding the dynamics of culture and society. "Storyworlds across Media" explores how media, old and new, give birth to various types of storyworlds and provide different ways of experiencing them, inviting readers to join an ongoing theoretical conversation focused on the question: how can narratology achieve media-consciousness?a The first part of the volume critically assesses the cross- and transmedial validity of narratological concepts such as storyworld, narrator, representation of subjectivity, and fictionality. The second part deals with issues of multimodality and intermediality across media. The third part explores the relation between media convergence and transmedial storyworlds, examining emergent forms of storytelling based on multiple media platforms. Taken together, these essays build the foundation for a media-conscious narratology that acknowledges both similarities and differences in the ways media narrate. aa"

An Introduction to Television Studies

Author: Jonathan Bignell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 348

View: 810

In this comprehensive textbook, now updated for its third edition, Jonathan Bignell provides students with a framework for understanding the key concepts and main approaches to Television Studies, including audience research, television history and broadcasting policy, and the analytical study of individual programmes. Features include: a glossary of key terms key terms defined in margins suggestions for further reading activities/assignments for use in class New and updated case studies feature: ‘Every Home Needs a Harvey’ ad approaches to news reporting television scheduling CSI Crime Scene Investigation animated cartoon series Individual chapters address: studying television, television histories, television cultures, television texts and narratives, television genres and formats, television production, television and quality, television realities, television you can’t see, television audiences, beyond television.

Religion and Doctor Who

Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith

Author: Andrew Crome

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 366

View: 375

Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.

Doctor Who and the Art of Adaptation

Fifty Years of Storytelling

Author: Marcus K. Harmes

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 244

View: 340

Doctor Who is one of the most enduring British programs over the last 50 years and its success has translated to the U.S., where it has been shown for decades, first on PBS stations and currently on BBC America. This book looks at how the writers and producers of Doctor Who have adapted—and will no doubt continue to do so—various texts to create many episodes throughout the show’s history.

Media Franchising

Creative License and Collaboration in the Culture Industries

Author: Derek Johnson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 387

"Johnson astutely reveals that franchises are not Borg-like assimilation machines, but, rather, complicated ecosystems within which creative workers strive to create compelling 'shared worlds.' This finely researched, breakthrough book is a must-read for anyone seeking a sophisticated understanding of the contemporary media industry." —Heather Hendershot, author of What's Fair on the Air?: Cold War Right-Wing Broadcasting and the Public Interest While immediately recognizable throughout the U.S. and many other countries, media mainstays like X-Men, Star Trek, and Transformers achieved such familiarity through constant reincarnation. In each case, the initial success of a single product led to a long-term embrace of media franchising—a dynamic process in which media workers from different industrial positions shared in and reproduced familiar cultureacross television, film, comics, games, and merchandising. In Media Franchising, Derek Johnson examines the corporate culture behind these production practices, as well as the collaborative and creative efforts involved in conceiving, sustaining, and sharing intellectual properties in media work worlds. Challenging connotations of homogeneity, Johnson shows how the cultural and industrial logic of franchising has encouraged media industries to reimagine creativity as an opportunity for exchange among producers, licensees, and evenconsumers. Drawing on case studies and interviews with media producers, he reveals the meaningful identities, cultural hierarchies, and struggles for distinction that accompany collaboration within these production networks. Media Franchising provides a nuanced portrait of the collaborative cultural production embedded in both the media industries and our own daily lives.