The Distance Between Us

A Memoir

Author: Reyna Grande

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 325

View: 124

Traces the author's experiences as an illegal child immigrant, describing her father's violent alcoholism, her efforts to obtain a higher education, and the inspiration of Latina authors.

A Dream Called Home

A Memoir

Author: Reyna Grande

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 108

From bestselling author of the remarkable memoir, The Distance Between Us comes an inspiring account of one woman’s quest to find her place in America as a first-generation Latina university student and aspiring writer determined to build a new life for her family one fearless word at a time. “Here is a life story so unbelievable, it could only be true” (Sandra Cisneros, bestselling author of The House on Mango Street). As an immigrant in an unfamiliar country, with an indifferent mother and abusive father, Reyna had few resources at her disposal. Taking refuge in words, Reyna’s love of reading and writing propels her to rise above until she achieves the impossible and is accepted to the University of California, Santa Cruz. Although her acceptance is a triumph, the actual experience of American college life is intimidating and unfamiliar for someone like Reyna, who is now estranged from her family and support system. Again, she finds solace in words, holding fast to her vision of becoming a writer, only to discover she knows nothing about what it takes to make a career out of a dream. Through it all, Reyna is determined to make the impossible possible, going from undocumented immigrant of little means to “a fierce, smart, shimmering light of a writer” (Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild); a National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist whose “power is growing with every book” (Luis Alberto Urrea, Pultizer Prize finalist); and a proud mother of two beautiful children who will never have to know the pain of poverty and neglect. Told in Reyna’s exquisite, heartfelt prose, A Dream Called Home demonstrates how, by daring to pursue her dreams, Reyna was able to build the one thing she had always longed for: a home that would endure.

Collective Identity and Cultural Resistance in Contemporary Chicana/o Autobiography

Author: Juan Velasco

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 846

The first book length study of this genre, Collective Identity and Cultural Resistance in Contemporary Chicana/o Autobiography facilitates new understandings of how people and cultures are displaced and reinvent themselves. Through the examination of visual arts and literature, Juan Velasco analyzes the space for self-expression that gave way to a new paradigm in contemporary Chicana/o autobiography. By bringing together self-representation with complex theoretical work around culture, ethnicity, race, gender, sex, and nationality, this work is at the crossroads of intersectional analysis and engages with scholarship on the creation of cross-border communities, the liberatory dimensions of cultural survival, and the reclaiming of new art fashioned against the mechanisms of violence that Mexican-Americans have endured.

Latinx Writing Los Angeles

Nonfiction Dispatches from a Decolonial Rebellion

Author: Ignacio López-Calvo

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 228

View: 734

Latinx Writing Los Angeles offers a critical anthology of Los Angeles’s most significant English-language and Spanish-language (in translation) nonfiction writing from the city’s inception to the present. Contemporary Latinx authors, including three Pulitzer Prize winners and writers such as Harry Gamboa Jr., Guillermo Gómez-Peña, and Rubén Martínez, focus on the ways in which Latinx Los Angeles’s nonfiction narratives record the progressive racialization and subalternization of Latinxs in the southwestern United States. While notions of racial memory, coloniality, biopolitics, internal colonialism, cultural assimilation, Mexican or pan-Latinx cultural nationalism, and transnationalism permeate this anthology, contributors advocate the idea of a contested modernity that refuses to accept mainstream cultural impositions, proposing instead alternative ways of knowing and understanding. Featuring a wide variety of voices as well as a diversity of subgenres, this collection is the first to illuminate divergent, hybrid Latinx histories and cultures. Redefining Los Angeles’s literary history and providing a new model for English, Spanish, and Latinx studies, Latinx Writing Los Angeles is an essential contribution to southwestern and borderland studies.

The Distance Between

A Memoir

Author: Timothy J. Hillegonds

Publisher: American Lives

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 108

The Distance Between is a nuanced exploration of and reckoning with absent fathers, fatherhood, addiction, adolescent rage, white male privilege, and the author's own toxic masculinity.

The Distance Between Us

Author: Maggie O'Farrell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 230

View: 642

Gripping, insightful and deft, THE DISTANCE BETWEEN US by Maggie O'Farrell is a haunting story of the way our families shape our lives, from the award-winning author of THIS MUST BE THE PLACE. It was a Sunday Times Top Ten bestseller and won the Somerset Maugham Award. On a cold February afternoon, Stella catches sight of a man she hasn't seen for many years, but instantly recognises. Or thinks she does. At the same moment on the other side of the globe, in the middle of a crowd of Chinese New Year revellers, Jake realises that things are becoming dangerous. They know nothing of one another's existence, but both Stella and Jake flee their lives: Jake in search of a place so remote it doesn't appear on any map, and Stella for a destination in Scotland, the significance of which only her sister, Nina, will understand.

The Memoir of a Nazarene

Jay Levi

Author: Edward J. Murray

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 143

View: 856

No one would disagree with the contention that the central figure in this semi-fictional work has been written about continuously for two millenniums. A continued interest in his life and commentary on it does seem timeless. It is the unanimous opinion in the Christian world that he is both true God and true man. Once they say it in good faith, they forget about his humanity and the frailties that come with it. They stay singularly preoccupied with his extra-terrestrial connection. This novel flips the preoccupation. It is a study of the real man. It is done so without diminishing the extraordinary events surrounding his life. The novel appears to be unique in that it allows the extraordinary man to talk for himself. It is unique in many ways. To name a few: there are weather reports, a calendar of events, his farm work, hours and mileage for his trips, his sport competitions, his high school days, and a man with a good sense of humor. A list of the fresh ways of looking at the man is long.