The Developing Child in the 21st Century

A global perspective on child development

Author: Sandra Smidt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 101

Offering a sociocultural approach to education and learning, this fascinating exploration of childhood provides an in-depth understanding of how children make sense of the world and the people in it. Examining the ways in which children express their thoughts, feelings and actively generate meaning through experience and interaction, this fully revised and updated new edition is illustrated throughout by extensive case studies and covers a diverse range of topics, including: socio-historical and global child development over time and place; the child as meaning-maker and active learner; learning in the context of family, culture, group, society; representing and re-representing the world; understanding roles, identity, race and gender; making sense of science and technology; the implications of neuroscience. Taking a clearly articulated and engaging perspective, Sandra Smidt draws upon multiple sources and ideas to illustrate many of the facets of the developing child in a contemporary context. She depicts children as symbol users, role-players, investigators and creative thinkers, and follows children's progress in forming their understanding of their environment, asking questions about it, and expressing it through music, dance, art and constructive play. Highly accessible, and with points for reflection concluding each chapter, The Developing Child is essential reading for teachers, lecturers and students taking courses in early childhood, psychology or sociology.

The Developing Child in the 21st Century

A Global Perspective on Child Development

Author: Sandra Smidt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 760

Taking a child-centred view of education and learning, this multidisciplinary exploration of childhood shows how children make sense of the world through everything they come into contact with, and all their interactions.

The Developing Child in the 21st Century, 2nd Edition

Author: Sandra Smidt

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 176

View: 385

Offering a sociocultural approach to education and learning, this fascinating exploration of childhood provides an in-depth understanding of how children make sense of the world and the people in it. Examining the ways in which children express their thoughts, feelings and actively generate meaning through experience and interaction, this fully revised and updated new edition is illustrated throughout by extensive case studies and covers a diverse range of topics, including: socio-historical and global child development over time and place; the child as meaning-maker and active learner; learning in the context of family, culture, group, society; representing and re-representing the world; understanding roles, identity, race and gender; making sense of science and technology; the implications of neuroscience. Taking a clearly articulated and engaging perspective, Sandra Smidt draws upon multiple sources and ideas to illustrate many of the facets of the developing child in a contemporary context. She depicts children as symbol users, role-players, investigators and creative thinkers, and follows children's progress in forming their understanding of their environment, asking questions about it, and expressing it through music, dance, art and constructive play. Highly accessible, and with points for reflection concluding each chapter, The Developing Child is essential reading for teachers, lecturers and students taking courses in early childhood, psychology or sociology.

The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st-Century Schools

Author: Mariale M. Hardiman

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 234

A powerful guide for applying brain research for more effective instruction The Brain-Targeted Teaching Model for 21st-Century Schools serves as a bridge between research and practice by providing a cohesive, proven, and usable model of effective instruction. Compatible with other professional development programs, this model shows how to apply educational and cognitive neuroscience principles into classroom settings through a pedagogical framework. The model’s six components are: (1) Establish the emotional connection to learning (2) Develop the physical learning environment (3) Design the learning experience (4) Teach for the mastery of content, skills, and concepts (5) Teach for the extension and application of knowledge (6) Evaluate learning

Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century

The Literary Agenda

Author: Maryanne Wolf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 135

The Literary Agenda is a series of short polemical monographs about the importance of literature and of reading in the wider world and about the state of literary education inside schools and universities. The category of 'the literary' has always been contentious. What is clear, however, is how increasingly it is dismissed or is unrecognised as a way of thinking or an arena for thought. It is sceptically challenged from within, for example, by the sometimes rival claims of cultural history, contextualized explanation, or media studies. It is shaken from without by even greater pressures: by economic exigency and the severe social attitudes that can follow from it; by technological change that may leave the traditional forms of serious human communication looking merely antiquated. For just these reasons this is the right time for renewal, to start reinvigorated work into the meaning and value of literary reading. Being Literate in the 21st Century wrestles with critical, timely questions for 21st-century society. How does literacy change the human brain? What does it mean to be a literate or a non-literate person in the present digital culture: for example, what will be lost in the present reading brain, and what will be gained with different mediums than print? What are the consequences of a digital reading brain for the literary mind and for writing itself ? Can knowledge about the reading brain and advances in technology offer new forms of literacy and new forms of knowledge to the peoples in remote regions of the world who would never otherwise become literate? By using both research from cognitive neuroscience, psycholinguistics, child development, and education, and considering literary examples from world literature, Maryanne Wolf plots a course that seeks to preserve the deepest forms of reading from the past, while developing the cognitive skills necessary for this century's next generation.

Cystic Fibrosis in the 21st Century

Author: Andrew Bush

Publisher: Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 329

View: 963

Cystic fibrosis used to be thought of as a respiratory and digestive disease, with a uniformly and rapidly fatal outcome. The spectrum of the disease has broadened into the mild atypical case, presenting in middle age, with the potential for complications in virtually every system of the body. In the past few years there has been an explosion of knowledge of the basic science of the defect. The editors have therefore invited the leading scientists and clinicians in the field of cystic fibrosis to describe the recent advances in this disease. Although there are many 'Recent Advances' texts, previous books have been selective in their choice of topics. This book is the first to cover the entire field of this complex disease, and encompasses the rapidly moving topics of the basic molecular and cellular biology as well as the recent multi-system, multi-disciplinary advances in the clinical care of patients. The authors have been charged with writing only about new developments and not to rehash old literature. The bulk of the references is therefore less than five years old. This book addresses all professionals who treat cystic fibrosis and want to have an up-date of new findings in the field, particularly of those outside their immediate specialisation. It will also be useful for basic researchers interested in related scientific areas and the clinical context of their work.

Understanding Schemas and Young Children

From Birth to Three

Author: Frances Atherton

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 657

Shortlisted for the 2013 Nursery World Awards! 'This exciting book will greatly enhance understanding of learning throughout the early years, and reinforces the importance of responsive professionals who understand children's schemas. Atherton and Nutbrown have brought together socio-cultural and cognitive learning theories with ease, and their metaphors are brilliantly evocative' -Dr Anne Meade, Consultant 'This book is drawn from a study carried out with rigour and contains several gems, such as the 'bike and slide exploration'; the idea of adults engaging in 'a dialogue of conceptual correspondence' with children; and tables outlining 'what the children might have been thinking'. A great read!' -Dr Cath Arnold, Pen Green Early Years Centre 'This is an exciting and illuminating account of babies and toddlers, following their schema fascinations with determination and competence, as they continually explore and experiment and come to know their world. This book captivated me. It should be in every early childhood education setting' -Pam Cubey This is the first book to focus specifically on Schemas and children under three. The authors trace the development of schemas from motor level through to symbolic representation, and show how to use schema theory to understand young children's learning and behaviour. This accessible and student-friendly book includes: -activities and discussion points -links to policy and practice -descriptive observational material -a look at the ethics of this kind of research -numerous photographs and illustrations -suggestions for follow-up reading The book is aimed at early childhood professionals and practitioners in ECEC settings, as well as those on initial training courses, teacher education, Early Years courses, and higher degrees.

Designing for the 21st Century

Interdisciplinary Questions and Insights

Author: Tom Inns

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 338

View: 337

An exploration of emergent roles for design and the 21st century designer explored through the work of 21 research teams. Over a twelve-month period each of these groups held a series of workshops and events to examine different facets of future design activity. Each of the contributions describes the context of enquiry, the journey taken by the research team and key insights generated through discourse. Editor and Initiative Director, Tom Inns, provides an introductory chapter that suggests ways that the reader might navigate these different viewpoints.

Playing to Learn

The role of play in the early years

Author: Sandra Smidt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 152

View: 596

Sandra Smidt sets out to explain what play is and why it is so important as one of the key ways of learning, particularly - but not solely - for young children. She argues that all play is purposeful, and can only truly considered to be play when the child has chosen what to do, where and how to do it. Using case studies drawn from all over the world, Smidt challenges some of the prevailing myths relating to play and pays close attention to what it is that early years professionals need to do to interpet the play, understand its purpose for the child and sometimes extend it. Attention is paid to the close links that play has with creativity, and the author also highlights the importance of being able to explain to colleagues, parents and even those in government, why play matters so much in terms of learning and development. This book will be of interest to anyone involved in early years’ education.