How to Attract the Wombat

Author: Will Cuppy

Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 165

View: 450

Will Cuppy is one of the greatest humorists this country has produced and is still (despite eleven printings of his imperishable The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody) too little known. Here is one of his three classic "How-To's," considering notable birds and animals whose habits (and often existence) seem to have disturbed Cuppy ("Birds Who Can't Even Fly," "Optional Insects," "Octopuses and Those Things"), as well as more mundane creatures like the frog, the gnat, and the moa, who have no visible vices but whose virtues are truly awful. Spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom, Cuppy neatly classes his observations for easy reference: Problem Mammals, Pleasures of Pond Life, Birds Who Can't Sing and Know It.Included with 50 shorter pieces are longer meditations like 'The Poet and the Nautilus," "Swan-upping, Indeed!" and "How to Swat a Fly," which codifies the essentials of this simple activity in ten hilarious principles. All this, plus over 100 delightful Nofziger drawings!But the seat of honor is, of course, occupied by the Wombat, the nocturnal star of three essays. Whether asleep in Rossetti's silver epergne or tunneling under the lawn, the wombat never fails to fascinate Cuppy, clearly supplying his alter ego for the animal kingdom.

How to Become Extinct

Author: Will Cuppy

Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 125

View: 717

In these 40 brief, witty essays, Will Cuppy, a perennially perturbed hermit who thought life was out to get him, turns his unflinching attention on those members of the animal kingdom whose habits are disagreeable, whose appearances are repellent, and whose continued existence need not necessarily be a foregone conclusion.

Will Cuppy, American Satirist

A Biography

Author: Wes D. Gehring

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 478

Back in the golden age of humor books (late 1920s-early 1950s), when wits of the pantheon like Robert Benchley, James Thurber, and S.J. Perelman were producing their signature works, there was another singular satirist who more than held his own with such fast company: Will Cuppy (1884-1949). This factual funnyman's metier is dark comedy that flirts with nihilism. His agenda is baldly stated in such classic Cuppy book titles as How to Be a Hermit (1929), How to Tell Your Friends from the Apes (1931), and The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody (1950). This biography doubles as a critical study of a satirist whose shish-kebabing of humanity was often done through the veiled anthropomorphic use of animals. For a biographer, Will Cuppy represents a treasure trove of possibilities. He was a great humorist, and most of his best work is still in print, but until now he has never been the subject of a book-length study. His mesmerizingly complex and eccentric private life almost trumps the comic accomplishments of his public persona.

CBS’s Don Hollenbeck

An Honest Reporter in the Age of McCarthyism

Author: Loren Ghiglione

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 960

Loren Ghiglione recounts the fascinating life and tragic suicide of Don Hollenbeck, the controversial newscaster who became a primary target of McCarthyism's smear tactics. Drawing on unsealed FBI records, private family correspondence, and interviews with Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Charles Collingwood, Douglas Edwards, and more than one hundred other journalists, Ghiglione writes a balanced biography that cuts close to the bone of this complicated newsman and chronicles the stark consequences of the anti-Communist frenzy that seized America in the late 1940s and 1950s. Hollenbeck began his career at the Lincoln, Nebraska Journal (marrying the boss's daughter) before becoming an editor at William Randolph Hearst's rip-roaring Omaha Bee-News. He participated in the emerging field of photojournalism at the Associated Press; assisted in creating the innovative, ad-free PM newspaper in New York City; reported from the European theater for NBC radio during World War II; and anchored television newscasts at CBS during the era of Edward R. Murrow. Hollenbeck's pioneering, prize-winning radio program, CBS Views the Press (1947-1950), was a declaration of independence from a print medium that had dominated American newsmaking for close to 250 years. The program candidly criticized the prestigious New York Times, the Daily News (then the paper with the largest circulation in America), and Hearst's flagship Journal-American and popular morning tabloid Daily Mirror. For this honest work, Hollenbeck was attacked by conservative anti-Communists, especially Hearst columnist Jack O'Brian, and in 1954, plagued by depression, alcoholism, three failed marriages, and two network firings (and worried about a third), Hollenbeck took his own life. In his investigation of this amazing American character, Ghiglione reveals the workings of an industry that continues to fall victim to censorship and political manipulation. Separating myth from fact, CBS's Don Hollenbeck is the definitive portrait of a polarizing figure who became a symbol of America's tortured conscience.

Iranian Political Satirists

Experience and motivation in the contemporary era

Author: Mahmud Farjami

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 213

View: 106

This volume surveys political satire as a journalistic genre in Iran since the latter days of the Qajar dynasty to the present, thus spanning one century and more. It is an important resource, but it also provides an analysis. Moreover, this volume is a rare effort to answer a question that looks simple but is very complicated: “Why would someone produce satire, knowing that this act might be followed by dangerous consequences?”, and to find out what motivates political satirists. For this aim, nine prominent political satirists have been interviewed: writers and cartoonists, men and women, those who live abroad and those who still live in Iran. The author analyses this data in relation to, among other things, the main theories of humor to provide a descriptive report for each satirist’s motivations as well as the strength of each motivational element in a general comparative context.

Greeks Bearing Gifts

The Public Use of Private Relationships in the Greek World, 435-323 BC

Author: Lynette G. Mitchell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 506

This book examines the political role of personal relationships in classical Greece.

Icons in the Fire

The Decline and Fall of Almost Everybody in the British Film Industry, 1984-2000

Author: Alexander Walker

Publisher: Orion Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 328

View: 792

Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, The Full Monty, Bridget Jones’ Diary—all these box-office hits were made in Britain, and yet none were financed by British money. In this final volume of his trilogy, Alexander Walker gives us the inside story of the British film industry from 1984 to 2000. He tackles questions like why a nation that produces actors of the caliber of Kenneth Branagh, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Emma Thompson, as well as directors like Anthony Minghella, Sam Mendes, and Stephen Frears, cannot sustain a native film industry.

If It's Not One Thing, It's Your Mother

Author: Julia Sweeney

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 176

Shares the author's parenting misadventures, from her decision to adopt as a single woman and her transition to a stay-at-home mom after marriage to her efforts to explain the birds and the bees to her precocious eight-year-old.