The Dancing Years

Author: Ivor Novello

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 53

View: 816

Cecil Clarke's adaptation for television has been used as the basis for the current revised version. While retaining all the well-known musical numbers, it allows a more fluid production, no longer dependent on major scene changes, and, by omitting scenes incidental to the main plot, has concentrated on the central love story between penniless, unknown composer, Rudi Kleber, who leaps to fame in Vienna of 1911, and the operetta star who first befriends him, Maria Ziegler.

The Dancing Years

Author: Ivor Novello

Publisher: Samuel French , Limited

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 64

View: 937

Cecil Clarke's adaptation for television has been used as the basis for the current revised version. While retaining all the well-known musical numbers, it allows a more fluid production, no longer dependent on major scene changes, and, by omitting scenes incidental to the main plot, has concentrated on the central love story between penniless, unknown composer, Rudi Kleber, who leaps to fame in Vienna of 1911, and the operetta star who first befriends him, Maria Ziegler.Large flexible cast

The Dancing Years

The Morland Dynasty, Book 33

Author: Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 640

View: 270

1919. As the euphoria of the Armistice fades, the nation counts the cost: millions dead or disabled, unemployment, strikes and shortages. As prices and taxes rise, it becomes harder to remember what the war was for. Teddy tries to recreate balance but then a trip to France to see the place where Ned fell has unforeseen consequences; Polly, grieving for Erich Kuppel, persuades her father to send her to New York. Despite Prohibtion, the great city, pulsing with life, promises her a fresh start; Jessie and Bertie, detained in London by Bertie's job, long to start their new life together; Jack becomes a pioneer of civil aviation, but when the company fails he's faced with unemployment, with a growing family to support. The generation that saw things no man should see must find relief from their own memories. A new world is struggling to be born out of the ashes; but as long as the music lasts, they will keep on dancing.

Those Dancing Years

An Autobiography

Author: Mary Ellis

Publisher: John Murray Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Actors

Page: 182

View: 924

The Dancing Years

Author: Bill Irvine

Publisher: W H Allen

ISBN:

Category: Ballroom dancing

Page: 176

View: 892

Charleston to Cha-cha

The Dancing Years of Olive Rowe

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dancers

Page: 3

View: 373

Article featuring the life of Olive Rowe, worker at the MacRobertson's Chocolate factory, later a dancer, and at the age of 75, winning the Supreme Award of the International Dancing Masters' Association.

Dance with Me

Ballroom Dancing and the Promise of Instant Intimacy

Author: Julia A. Ericksen

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 279

View: 282

Click here to listen to Julia Ericksen's interview about Dance with Me on Philadelphia NPR's "Radio Times" Rumba music starts and a floor full of dancers alternate clinging to one another and turning away. Rumba is an erotic dance, and the mood is hot and heavy; the women bend and hyperextend their legs as they twist and turn around their partners. Amateur and professional ballroom dancers alike compete in a highly gendered display of intimacy, romance and sexual passion. In Dance With Me, Julia Ericksen, a competitive ballroom dancer herself, takes the reader onto the competition floor and into the lights and the glamour of a world of tanned bodies and glittering attire, exploring the allure of this hyper-competitive, difficult, and often expensive activity. In a vivid ethnography accompanied by beautiful photographs of all levels of dancers, from the world’s top competitors to social dancers, Ericksen examines the ways emotional labor is used to create intimacy between professional partners and between professionals and their students, illustrating how dancers purchase intimacy. She shows that, while at first glance, ballroom presents a highly gendered face with men leading and women following, dancing also transgresses gender.

Popular Musical Theatre in London and Berlin

1890 to 1939

Author: Len Platt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 312

In the decades before the Second World War, popular musical theatre was one of the most influential forms of entertainment. This is the first book to reconstruct early popular musical theatre as a transnational and highly cosmopolitan industry that included everything from revues and operettas to dance halls and cabaret. Bringing together contributors from Britain and Germany, this collection moves beyond national theatre histories to study Anglo-German relations at a period of intense hostility and rivalry. Chapters frame the entertainment zones of London and Berlin against the wider trading routes of cultural transfer, where empire and transatlantic song and dance produced, perhaps for the first time, a genuinely international culture. Exploring adaptations and translations of works under the influence of political propaganda, this collection will be of interest both to musical theatre enthusiasts and to those interested in the wider history of modernism.

A Tanner's Worth of Tune

Rediscovering the Post-war British Musical

Author: Adrian Wright

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 308

View: 951

This book is not an encyclopaedia of the British musical in the twentieth century but an examination of its progress as it struggled to find an identity, stepping out of the shadow of its American counterpart. Illustrated with a wealth of contemporary photographs and memorabilia, it examines the contribution of key figures - from Ivor Novello to Lionel Bart - in Adrian Wright's lively and engaging prose.

Morland Dynasty 33

The Dancing Years

Author: Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 640

View: 595

1919. As the euphoria of the Armistice fades, the nation counts the cost: millions dead or disabled, unemployment, strikes and shortages. As prices and taxes rise, it becomes harder to remember what the war was for. Teddy tries to recreate balance but then a trip to France to see the place where Ned fell has unforeseen consequences; Polly, grieving for Erich Kuppel, persuades her father to send her to New York. Despite Prohibtion, the great city, pulsing with life, promises her a fresh start; Jessie and Bertie, detained in London by Bertie's job, long to start their new life together; Jack becomes a pioneer of civil aviation, but when the company fails he's faced with unemployment, with a growing family to support. The generation that saw things no man should see must find relief from their own memories. A new world is struggling to be born out of the ashes; but as long as the music lasts, they will keep on dancing.

Ray Davies

A Complicated Life

Author: Johnny Rogan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 768

View: 242

NOW UPDATED WITH A NEW EPILOGUE In the summer of 1964, aged twenty, Ray Davies led the Kinks to fame with their number one hit ‘You Really Got Me’. Within months, they were established among the pop elite, swamped by fans and fast becoming renowned for the rioting at their gigs. But Ray’s journey from working-class Muswell Hill to the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame was tumultuous in the extreme, featuring breakdowns, bitter lawsuits, spectacular punch-ups and a ban from entering the USA. His relationship with his brother Dave is surely the most ferocious and abusive in music history. Based on countless interviews conducted over several decades, this richly detailed and revelatory biography presents the most frank and intimate portrait yet of Ray Davies.

West End Broadway

The Golden Age of the American Musical in London

Author: Adrian Wright

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 364

View: 529

"West End Broadway discusses every American musical seen in London between 1945 and 1972."--Jacket.

British Theatre and Performance 1900-1950

Author: Rebecca D'Monte

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 506

British theatre from 1900 to 1950 has been subject to radical re-evaluation with plays from the period setting theatres alight and gaining critical acclaim once again; this book explains why, presenting a comprehensive survey of the theatre and how it shaped the work that followed. Rebecca D'Monte examines how the emphasis upon the working class, 'angry' drama from the 1950s has led to the neglect of much of the century's earlier drama, positioning the book as part of the current debate about the relationship between war and culture, the middlebrow, and historiography. In a comprehensive survey of the period, the book considers: - the Edwardian theatre; - the theatre of the First World War, including propaganda and musicals; -the interwar years, the rise of commercial theatre and influence of Modernism; - the theatre of the Second World War and post-war period. Essays from leading scholars Penny Farfan, Steve Nicholson and Claire Cochrane give further critical perspectives on the period's theatre and demonstrate its relevance to the drama of today. For anyone studying 20th-century British Drama this will prove one of the foundational texts.

Hell House

And Other True Hauntings from Around the World

Author: Allison Vale

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 208

View: 750

The chilling title of this hair-raising volume refers to the real-life Hell House of New Orleans—a mansion haunted by the ghosts of tortured and murdered slaves. But that’s only one of the 43 forbidding locations documented within these pages. Bold readers are invited to go on a world-spanning tour of haunted places, to meet ghosts, apparitions, and spirits such as the Windigo of the remote Canadian forests, which possesses unwary travelers and compels them to eat human flesh. Here also are such horrors as the moving coffins of Barbados, the Hungry Ghosts of China, and other bizarre manifestations of the spirit world. Truly a feast of shudders and thrills for all fans of the supernatural.

The Two of Us

My Life with John Thaw

Author: Sheila Hancock

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 971

When John Thaw, star of The Sweeney and Inspector Morse, died from cancer in 2002, a nation lost one of its finest actors and Sheila Hancock lost a beloved husband. In this unique double biography she chronicles their lives - personal and professional, together and apart. John Thaw was born in Manchester, the son of a lorry driver. When he arrived at RADA on a scholarship he felt an outsider. In fact his timing was perfect: it was the sixties and television was beginning to make its mark. With his roles in Z-Cars and The Sweeney, fame came quickly. But it was John's role as Morse that made him an icon. In 1974 he married Sheila Hancock, with whom he shared a working-class background and a RADA education. Sheila was already the star of the TV series The Rag Trade and went on to become the first woman artistic director at the RSC. Theirs was a sometimes turbulent, always passionate relationship, and in this remarkable book Sheila describes their love - weathering overwork and the pressures of celebrity, drink and cancer - with honesty and piercing intelligence, and evokes two lives lived to the utmost.