The Cultural Revolution and Post-Mao Reforms

A Historical Perspective

Author: Tang Tsou

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 364

"Tsou, one of the country's senior and most widely respected China scholars, has for more than a generation been producing timely and deeply informed essays on Chinese politics as it develops. Eight of these (from a wide variety of sources) are gathered here with a substantial new introduction. Tsou considers events not simply from the point of view of a widely read political scientist (even political philosopher) and a concerned Chinese, but also in the light of history, the dynamics of Marxism-Leninism, individual personalities, and humane realism."—Charles W. Hayford, Library Journal

China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution

Master Narratives and Post-Mao Counternarratives

Author: Woei Lien Chong

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 142

Treating China's Cultural Revolution as much more than a political event, this innovative volume explores its ideological dimensions. The contributors focus especially on the CR's discourse of heroism and messianism and its demonization of the enemy as reflected in political practice, official literature, and propaganda art, arguing that these characteristics can be traced back to hitherto-neglected undercurrents of Chinese tradition. Moreover, while most studies of the Cultural Revolution are content to point to the discredited cult of heroism and messianism, this book also explores the alternative discourses that have flourished to fill the resulting vacuum. The contributors analyze the intense intellectual and artistic ferment in post-Mao China that embody resistance to CR ideology, as well as the urgent quest for authentic individuality, new forms of social cohesion, and historical truth. Contributions by: Anne-Marie Brady, Woei Lien Chong, Lowell Dittmer, Monika Gaenssbauer, Nick Knight, Stefan R. Landsberger, Nora Sausmikat, Barend J. ter Haar, Natascha Vittinghoff, and Lan Yang.

The Paradox of China's Post-Mao Reforms

Author: Merle Goldman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 613

China's bold program of reforms launched in the late 1970s--the move to a market economy and the opening to the outside world--ended the political chaos and economic stagnation of the Cultural Revolution and sparked China's unprecedented economic boom. Yet, while the reforms made possible a rising standard of living for the majority of China's population, they came at the cost of a weakening central government, increasing inequalities, and fragmenting society. The essays of Barry Naughton, Joseph Fewsmith, Paul H. B. Godwin, Murray Scot Tanner, Lianjiang Li and Kevin J. O'Brien, Tianjian Shi, Martin King Whyte, Thomas P. Bernstein, Dorothy J. Solinger, David S. G. Goodman, Kristen Parris, Merle Goldman, Elizabeth J. Perry, and Richard Baum and Alexei Shevchenko analyze the contradictory impact of China's economic reforms on its political system and social structure. They explore the changing patterns of the relationship between state and society that may have more profound significance for China than all the revolutionary movements that have convulsed it through most of the twentieth century.

Mao's China and After

A History of the People's Republic, Third Edition

Author: Maurice Meisner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 587

View: 620

When MAO'S CHINA first appeared in 1977, it was hailed as the single most useful general volume on recent Chinese history, covering every important question of the time with clarity and amazing insight. Now, Meisner brings the third edition of his definitive work, with new information provided throughout the classic study. Including a whole new section in Part Six, 'Deng Xiaoping and the Origins of Chinese Capitalism: 1976-1998', Meisner assesses the country's uneasy relationship with democracy, socialism and capitalism. Retaining the elegance, lucidity and comprehensiveness he is known for, Meisner moves far beyond his previous work to paint a never-before-seen portrait of the political and social realities of China on the brink of the new Millennium, and the global implications of its rise to economic and political power.

The Origins of the Cultural Revolution

Volume III, the Coming of the Cataclysm 1961--1966

Author: Roderick MacFarquhar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 776

This is the final volume in a now-classic trilogy that seeks an answer to this question as it examines the politics, economics, culture, and international relations of China from the mid-1950s to the mid 1960s. The Coming of the Cataclysm explores the important events leading up to the Cultural Revolution, and details the ways in which Mao continually tested the Chinese Communist Party.

Political Reform in Post-Mao China

Democracy and Bureaucracy in a Leninist State

Author: Barrett L. McCormick

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 222

View: 343

Since the death of Mao the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party has embarked on a series of ambitious political reforms. In his new book, Barrett McCormick develops a theory of Leninist states to explore the prospect for these reforms. He finds that, while significant economic and political gains have been made for the Chinese people, the basic contours of the state remain unchanged; and as events in June 1989 clearly showed, reform has not diminished the state's ability to impose its perogatives on society. Drawing on Weber's political sociology, McCormick argues that patronage and corruption are integral aspects of Leninist rulership. Reformers have attempted to promote democracy and law and to fight corruption, but when they attempt to implement their programs through traditional hierarchical Leninist institutions, lower-level cadres have been able to utilize patronage networks to blunt the impact of reform and protect their personal agenda. In his case studies of the legal system, the people's congress, and party rectification, McCormick points up these obstacles to progressive change and assesses the extent to which reformers' goals have been realized. He shows that, despite the often radical nature of the reform movements, the principal dimensions of the Leninist system--one party rule, state domination of the economy, a confining ideology--remain largely intact. These findings will be of interest to China specialists as well as students of comparative communism and Leninist states. Since the death of Mao the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party has embarked on a series of ambitious political reforms. In his new book, Barrett McCormick develops a theory of Leninist states to explore the prospect for these reforms. He finds that, while significant economic and political gains have been made for the Chinese people, the basic contours of the state remain unchanged; and as events in June 1989 clearly showed, reform has not diminished the state's ability to impose its perogatives on society. Drawing on Weber's political sociology, McCormick argues that patronage and corruption are integral aspects of Leninist rulership. Reformers have attempted to promote democracy and law and to fight corruption, but when they attempt to implement their programs through traditional hierarchical Leninist institutions, lower-level cadres have been able to utilize patronage networks to blunt the impact of reform and protect their personal agenda. In his case studies of the legal system, the people's congress, and party rectification, McCormick points up these obstacles to progressive change and assesses the extent to which reformers' goals have been realized. He shows that, despite the often radical nature of the reform movements, the principal dimensions of the Leninist system--one party rule, state domination of the economy, a confining ideology--remain largely intact. These findings will be of interest to China specialists as well as students of comparative communism and Leninist states.

The Cultural Revolution on Trial

Justice in the Post-Mao Transition

Author: Alexander C. Cook

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 294

This book provides the first account of the most famous trial in Chinese history, and details the search for justice after Mao's Cultural Revolution.

Power Restructuring In China And Russia

Author: Mark Lupher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 255

Viewing the tumultuous events of the post-Mao era and the period of perestroika in the light of broader historical patterns, this book focuses on power restructuring - the ebb and flow of state power, the centralization and decentralization of political and economic power, and the three-way struggles between central rulers, various elites, and non-privileged groups that drive these processes. By comparing a series of pivotal episodes, the author aims to further readers' understanding of power-restructuring processes that will continue to unfold in China, Russia and the former Soviet republics.