The Creationist Writings of Byron C. Nelson

Author: Byron Christopher Nelson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 505

View: 443

First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Creationist Writings of Byron C. Nelson

Author: Paul Nelson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 538

View: 714

Originally published in 1995 this is the fifth volume in the series Creationism in 20th Century America. It re-publishes After Its Kind – a critique on theories of biological evolution and a defense of the biblical account of creation which Nelson wrote when he was a Pastor in New Jersey where he also attended classes in genetics and zoology at Rutgers university. His 1931 volume The Deluge Story in Stone: A History of the Flood Theory of Geology, also reprinted here was continuously in print until the 1960s. As his scientific and theological correspondence expanded in the wake of his publications, Nelson became further involved in the ‘evolution debates’. During the late 1930s his writings concentrated on early man and the glacial phenomena he saw all about him in Wisconsin and he compiled the materials he thought necessary to relate Scripture to the evidence of human antiquity.

The Creationist Writings of Byron C. Nelson

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 532

View: 950

Originally published in 1995 this is the fifth volume in the series Creationism in 20th Century America. It re-publishes After Its Kind - a critique on theories of biological evolution and a defense of the biblical account of creation which Nelson wrote when he was a Pastor in New Jersey where he also attended classes in genetics and zoology at Rutgers university. His 1931 volume The Deluge Story in Stone: A History of the Flood Theory of Geology, also reprinted here was continuously in print until the 1960s. As his scientific and theological correspondence expanded in the wake of his publications, Nelson became further involved in the 'evolution debates'. During the late 1930s his writings concentrated on early man and the glacial phenomena he saw all about him in Wisconsin and he compiled the materials he thought necessary to relate Scripture to the evidence of human antiquity.

Darwinian Heresies

Author: Abigail Lustig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 200

View: 114

In Darwinian Heresies, which was originally published in 2004, prominent historians and philosophers of science trace the history of evolutionary thought, and challenge many of the assumptions that have built up over the years. Covering a wide range of issues starting in the eighteenth century, Darwinian Heresies brings us through the time of Charles Darwin and the Origin, and then through the twentieth century to the present. It is suggested that Darwin's true roots lie in Germany, not his native England, that Russian evolutionism is more significant than many are prepared to allow, and that the true influence on twentieth-century evolution biology was not Charles Darwin at all, but his often-despised contemporary, Herbert Spencer. The collection was intended to interest, to excite, to infuriate, and to stimulate further work.

Science and Christianity in Pulpit and Pew

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 906

As past president of both the History of Science Society and the American Society of Church History, Ronald L. Numbers is uniquely qualified to assess the historical relations between science and Christianity. In this collection of his most recent essays, he moves beyond the clichés of conflict and harmony to explore the tangled web of historical interactions involving scientific and religious beliefs. In his lead essay he offers an unprecedented overview of the history of science and Christianity from the perspective of the ordinary people who filled the pews of churchesor loitered around outside. Unlike the elite scientists and theologians on whom most historians have focused, these vulgar Christians cared little about the discoveries of Copernicus, Newton, and Einstein. Instead, they worried about the causes of the diseases and disasters that directly affected their lives and about scientists preposterous attempts to trace human ancestry back to apes. Far from dismissing opinion-makers in the pulpit, Numbers closely looks at two the most influential Protestant theologians in nineteenth-century America: Charles Hodge and William Henry Green. Hodge, after decades of struggling to harmonize Gods two revelationsin nature and in the Biblein the end famously described Darwinism as atheism. Green, on the basis of his careful biblical studies, concluded that Ussher's chronology was unreliable, thus opening the door for Christian anthropologists to accommodate the subsequent discovery of human antiquity. In Science without God Numbers traces the millennia-long history of so-called methodological naturalism, the commitment to explaining the natural world without appeals to the supernatural. By the early nineteenth century this practice was becoming the defining characteristic of science; in the late twentieth century it became the central point of attack in the audacious attempt of intelligent designers to redefine science. Numbers ends his reassessment by arguing that although science has markedly changed the world we live in, it has contributed less to secularizing it than many have claimed. Taken together, these accessible and authoritative essays form a perfect introduction to Christian attitudes towards science since the 17th century.

The Religious Right

A Reference Handbook

Author: Glenn H. Utter

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 382

View: 709

This second edition of an award winning reference work updates and expands its examination of the religious right and its influence on our government, citizens, society, and politics. * Biographies of the men and women who have advanced the cause and an up to date chronology illuminate the movement's goals * Further research is aided by annotated listings of print and nonprint resources, websites, and organizations affiliated with the religious right, as well as those in opposition

Early Creationist Journals

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 629

View: 446

First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Creation-Evolution Debates

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 526

View: 281

Originally published in 1995, Creation-Evolution Debates is the second volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America, reissued in 2021. The volume comprises eight debates from the early 1920s and 1930s between prominent evolutionists and creationists of the time. The original sources detail debates that took place either orally or in print, as well as active debates between creationists over the true meaning of Genesis I. The essays in this volume feature prominent discussions between the likes of Edwin Grant Conklin, Henry Fairfield Osbourne and William Jennings Bryan, John Roach Francis and Charles Francis Potter, George McCready Price and Joseph McCabe and William Bell Riley versus Charles Smith, amongst many others. The collection will be of especial interest to natural historians, and theologians as well as academics of philosophy, and history.

The Early Writings of Harold W. Clark and Frank Lewis Marsh

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 562

View: 168

Originally published in 1995, The Early Writings of Harold W. Clark and Frank Lewis Marsh is the eighth volume in the Creationism in Twentieth Century America series, reissued in 2019. The book is a collection of original writings by the prominent creationist Harold W. Clark, and the biologist, educator and young Earth creationist Frank Lewis Marsh. Although both were significant figures in the anti-evolutionist movement of the early 20th century, unlike other members of the movement, both Marsh and Clarke were trained scientists studying under eminent evolutionists of the time. Both writers struggled to reconcile new scientific understandings of geology, botany and palaeontology, supported by Darwin’s theory of evolution, with their own creationist beliefs in genesis and flood theory. Both scientists as such began to develop their own theories of evolution that remained in line with creationist beliefs. This compact and unique collection includes the writings of Marsh and Clark from this period, featuring some of their well-known works on the subject including ‘Back to Creation’ and ‘Fundamental Biology’. This volume of original sources will be of interest to academics of religion, natural history and historians of the 19th century.

Selected Works of George McCready Price

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 514

View: 436

Originally published in 1995, The Selected Works of George McCready Price is the seventh volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America, reissued in 2021. The volume brings together the original writings and pamphlets of George McCready Price, a leading creationist of the early antievolution crusade of the 1920s. McCready Price labelled himself the ‘principal scientific authority of the Fundamentalists’ and as a self-taught scientist he enjoyed more scientific repute amongst fundamentalists of the time. This interesting and unique collection of original source material includes five of his writings between 1906 and 1924, challenging the new Darwinian theory of evolution and natural selection through his writings on the natural sciences. His literature covers the topics of evolution and biology and critiques biological arguments for evolution. He also wrote widely on geology offering his own alternative argument of ‘flood geography’ in opposition to the Darwinian theory concerning palaeontology and geology. This volume will be of interest to historians of natural history and the creationism movement, as well as scholars of religion and American history.

The Antievolution Works of Arthur I. Brown

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 230

View: 584

Originally published in 1995, The Antievolution Works of Arthur I. Brown is the third volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America. The volume brings together original sources from the prominent surgeon and creationist Arthur I. Brown. Brown discredited evolution as it was contrary to the ‘clear statements of scripture’ which he believed infallible, stating evolution instead to be both a hoax and ‘a weapon of Satan’. The works included focus on Brown’s polemic through his early twentieth century writings. The essays focus on his scientific investigations and provide a negative commentary upon Darwin’s theory of evolution instead focusing on biblical explanations for evolution. As a scientist Brown’s unique view of evolution from a creationist and scientific viewpoint provides a fascinating lens through which to view the historical debates surrounding evolution and provides a unique insight into how Darwinian theory affected both the scientific and religious communities. This book will be of interest to natural historians, and theologians as well as academics of philosophy and history.

The Antievolution Pamphlets of William Bell Riley

Author: William Vance Trollinger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 250

View: 532

Originally published in 1995, The Antievolution Pamphlets of William Bell Riley is the fourth volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America, reissued in 2021. The volume comprises of nine antievolution pamphlets written by William Bell Riley during the interwar years. The pamphlets detail Riley’s antievolutionist ideas and activities, and the book attempts to place the work in the larger contexts of Riley’s career, as well as discussing the pamphlets included. The collection will be of especial interest to natural historians, and theologians as well as academics of philosophy, and history.

The Antievolution Pamphlets of Harry Rimmer

Author: Edward B. Davis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 534

View: 642

Originally published in 1995, The Antievolution Pamphlets of Harry Rimmer is the sixth volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America. The volume brings together original sources from the prominent evangelist and pastor Harry Rimmer. The consortium of pamphlets in this volume detail Rimmer’s antievolutionist sentiments, a notion which characterized his early writings. The pamphlets detail Rimmer’s rhetoric on evolution and science from the early part of the 20th century as he travelled across America to disseminate his writings. The works in this volume address Rimmer’s polemic on the danger posed by modern science and the consequential disassociation with religion. While Rimmer did not discount science itself, he argued for, what he termed, ‘true science’, claiming that modern science was based only in scientific opinion and not fact. As a self-proclaimed scientist, these writings take a unique view of the relationship between religion and science from this period through Rimmer’s dual nature as both scientist and pastor. This volume will be of great interest to historians of natural history, science and religion.

Antievolutionism Before World War I

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 428

View: 536

Originally published in 1995, Antievolutionism Before World War I is the first volume in the series, Creationism in Twentieth Century America, reissued in 2021. The volume brings together original sources from the beginning of the twentieth century, critiquing Darwinism and the theory of natural selection. The sources included in this collection debate the role of natural selection in evolution, as well wider aspects of Darwinian theory from a creationist stance. The essays feature prominent figures from the period in the fields of naturalism, philosophy and theology and includes contributions from Alexander Patterson, Eberhard Dennert, Luther Tracy Townsend and George Frederick Wright. The collection will be of especial interest to natural historians, and theologians as well as academics of philosophy, geology and history.

Darwin and Velikovsky : Cataclysmic Metamorphic Evolution a Materialist Theory of Evolution Based on New Principles and Evidence

Author: Charles Ginenthal

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page:

View: 227

The basis of evolutionary change, according to Ginenthal, is master genes that have been conserved from the time of the Cambrian explosion to the present. By following these master genes and using the fossil record as the true evidence of evolution, is it shown why no new phyla have developed since the Cambrian explosion and why the chronology for dating evolution is in serious error. Ginenthal then outlines the evolution of the vertebrates from their earliest appearance to the present via saltations that morph and metamorph new species at the times of Velikovskian global cataclysms. Throughout the book, Ginenthal elucidates how the master genes operate to do this and also presents new evidence connecting this process to physics. Those who read this volume will have an entirely new understanding of evolution and may never think about it in the same way.

Genesis Kinds

Creationism and the Origin of Species

Author: Todd Charles Wood

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 202

View: 297

The Creation/evolution Controversy

An Annotated Bibliography

Author: James L. Hayward

Publisher: Magill Bibliographies

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 253

View: 128

This collection of 447 annotated references provides an overview of the literature addressing the creation/evolution controversy for students, teachers, lawyers, writers, historians, scientists, sociologists, clerics, and other interested persons. Fifty-four annotations in the chapter on historical references highlight influential volumes published between 1543 and 1980--classic works that inform the views of later writers. These historical works are listed chronologically in order of publication. The remaining 393 entries feature books published from 1981 (the year of the "Scopes II" trial in Arkansas) to 1996, and include works that address historical, sociological, philosophical, religious, cosmological, geological, biological, and anthropological issues surrounding the creation/evolution controversy. The annotations are written in an informative, impartial style. Except for references in the chapter containing historical sources and in the chapter featuring works on the history of the creation/evolution controversy, references are grouped under "theistic" and "non-theistic" headings. An introductory essay describes the history of evolutionary theory and creationism, and defines the distinguishing features of each thought system. An annotated list of periodicals featuring articles on creationism and evolutionism is also provided. With author, title, and subject indexes.

The Creationists

From Scientific Creationism to Intelligent Design

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 606

View: 339

In light of the embattled status of evolutionary theory, particularly as "intelligent design" makes headway against Darwinism in the schools and in the courts, this now classic account of the roots of creationism assumes new relevance. Expanded and updated to account for the appeal of intelligent design and the global spread of creationism, The Creationists offers a thorough, clear, and balanced overview of the arguments and figures at the heart of the debate. Praised by both creationists and evolutionists for its comprehensiveness, the book meticulously traces the dramatic shift among Christian fundamentalists from acceptance of the earth's antiquity to the insistence of present-day scientific creationists that most fossils date back to Noah's flood and its aftermath. Focusing especially on the rise of this "flood geology," Ronald L. Numbers chronicles the remarkable resurgence of antievolutionism since the 1960s, as well as the creationist movement's tangled religious roots in the theologies of late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Baptists, Presbyterians, Lutherans, and Adventists, among others. His book offers valuable insight into the origins of various "creation science" think tanks and the people behind them. It also goes a long way toward explaining how creationism, until recently viewed as a "peculiarly American" phenomenon, has quietly but dynamically spread internationally--and found its expression outside Christianity in Judaism and Islam.