The Country And The City

Author: Raymond Williams

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 512

View: 542

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY TRISTRAM HUNT Our collective notion of the city and country is irresistibly powerful. The city as the seat of enlightenment, sophistication, power and greed is in profound contrast with an innocent, peaceful, backward countryside. Examining literature since the sixteenth century, Williams traces the development of our conceptions of these two traditional poles of life. His groundbreaking study casts the country and city as central symbols for the social and economic changes associated with capitalist development.

The Country and the City Revisited

England and the Politics of Culture, 1550-1850

Author: Gerald MacLean

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 368

Between 1550 and 1850, the great age of mercantilism, the English people remade themselves from a disparate group of individuals and localities divided by feudal loyalties, dialects and even languages, into an imperial power. Examining literature, art and social life, and returning to ground first explored by Raymond Williams in his seminal work, The Country and the City Revisited traces this transformation. It shows that what Williams figured as an urban-rural dichotomy can now be more satisfactorily grasped as a permeable boundary. While the movement of sugar, tobacco and tea became ever more deeply interfused with the movement of people, through migration and the slave trade, these commodities initiated new conceptions of space, time and identity. Spanning the traditional periods of the Renaissance and Romanticism, this collection of essays offers exciting interdisciplinary perspectives on central issues of early modern English history.

Food Between the Country and the City

Ethnographies of a Changing Global Foodscape

Author: Nuno Domingos

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 297

At a time when the relationship between 'the country' and 'the city' is in flux worldwide, the value and meanings of food associated with both places continue to be debated. Building upon the foundation of Raymond Williams' classic work, The Country and the City, this volume examines how conceptions of the country and the city invoked in relation to food not only reflect their changing relationship but have also been used to alter the very dynamics through which countryside and cities, and the food grown and eaten within them, are produced and sustained. Leading scholars in the study of food offer ethnographic studies of peasant homesteads, family farms, community gardens, state food industries, transnational supermarkets, planning offices, tourist boards, and government ministries in locales across the globe. This fascinating collection provides vital new insight into the contested dynamics of food and will be key reading for upper-level students and scholars of food studies, anthropology, history and geography.

The Country in the City

The Greening of the San Francisco Bay Area

Author: Richard A. Walker

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 737

Winner of the Western History Association's 2009 Hal K. Rothman Award Finalist in the Western Writers of America Spur Award for the Western Nonfiction Contemporary category (2008). The San Francisco Bay Area is one of the world's most beautiful cities. Despite a population of 7 million people, it is more greensward than asphalt jungle, more open space than hardscape. A vast quilt of countryside is tucked into the folds of the metropolis, stitched from fields, farms and woodlands, mines, creeks, and wetlands. In The Country in the City, Richard Walker tells the story of how the jigsaw geography of this greenbelt has been set into place. The Bay Area�s civic landscape has been fought over acre by acre, an arduous process requiring popular mobilization, political will, and hard work. Its most cherished environments--Mount Tamalpais, Napa Valley, San Francisco Bay, Point Reyes, Mount Diablo, the Pacific coast--have engendered some of the fiercest environmental battles in the country and have made the region a leader in green ideas and organizations. This book tells how the Bay Area got its green grove: from the stirrings of conservation in the time of John Muir to origins of the recreational parks and coastal preserves in the early twentieth century, from the fight to stop bay fill and control suburban growth after the Second World War to securing conservation easements and stopping toxic pollution in our times. Here, modern environmentalism first became a mass political movement in the 1960s, with the sudden blooming of the Sierra Club and Save the Bay, and it remains a global center of environmentalism to this day. Green values have been a pillar of Bay Area life and politics for more than a century. It is an environmentalism grounded in local places and personal concerns, close to the heart of the city. Yet this vision of what a city should be has always been informed by liberal, even utopian, ideas of nature, planning, government, and democracy. In the end, green is one of the primary colors in the flag of the Left Coast, where green enthusiasms, like open space, are built into the fabric of urban life. Written in a lively and accessible style, The Country in the City will be of interest to general readers and environmental activists. At the same time, it speaks to fundamental debates in environmental history, urban planning, and geography.

The city and the country

proceedings from the Sixth British and Cultural Studies Conference, Dresden 1995

Author: Technische Universität Dresden

Publisher: Blaue Eule

ISBN:

Category: City and town life

Page: 222

View: 160

Quarterly Essay 42 Fair Share

Country and City in Australia

Author: Judith Brett

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 533

Once the country believed itself to be the true face of Australia: sunburnt men and capable women raising crops and children, enduring isolation and a fickle environment, carrying the nation on their sturdy backs. For almost 200 years after white settlement began, city Australia needed the country: to feed it, to earn its export income, to fill the empty land, to provide it with distinctive images of the nation being built in the great south land. But Australia no longer rides on the sheep's back, and since the 1980s, when ''economic rationalism'' became the new creed, the country has felt abandoned, its contribution to the nation dismissed, its historic purpose forgotten. In Fair Share, Judith Brett argues that our federation was built on the idea of a big country and a fair share, no matter where one lived. We also looked to the bush for our legends and we still look to it for our food. These are not things we can just abandon. In late 2010, with the country independents deciding who would form federal government, it seemed that rural and regional Australia's time had come again. But, as Murray - Darling water reform shows, the politics of dependence are complicated. The question remains: what will be the fate of the country in an era of user - pays, water cutbacks, climate change, droughts and flooding rains? What are the prospects for a new compact between country and city in Australia in the twenty - first century? ''Once the problems of the country were problems for the country as a whole. But then government stepped back … The problems of the country were seen as unfortunate for those affected but not likely to have much impact on the rest of Australia. The agents of neoliberalism cut the country loose from the city and left it to fend for itself.'' - Judith Brett, Fair Share.

The City Girl And The Country Doctor

Author: Christine Flynn

Publisher: Silhouette

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 376

Thanksgiving News from The Rosewood Reader Dear Readers, You've all been wondering what big-city Rebecca Peters has been doing after moving to sleepy little Danbury Way. One thing's for sure: Rebecca's full of secrets—and surprises. The beautiful fashion writer has even become an unlikely animal lover after meeting the town veterinarian, Dr. Joe Hudson. Sure, country-boy Joe and cosmopolitan Rebecca seem an unlikely match. But these two opposites definitely attract. Joe might be able to help Rebecca finally find her long-lost father and solve the puzzle of her past—for once and for all. And this Turkey Day, Rebecca might be giving thanks for becoming the woman who opened Joe's heart!

The City PI and the Country Cop

Author: Edward Kendrick

Publisher: JMS Books LLC

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 165

View: 659

A murder in a small Colorado town closely resembles unsolved crimes committed by a serial killer almost thirty years ago. Private investigator Teague Donovan learns of the recent murder and is instantly drawn to the case, because one of the victims in the past was his best friend, and he is determined to bring the killer to justice. Hoyt Newman, the detective in charge of the most recent case, is none too happy with Teague's interfering. At least not until a second homeless boy is tortured and killed. As the two men work together, they begin to develop an interest in each other -- one that seems fated not to come to fruition since Teague is city, through and through, and Hoyt is definitely country to the core.