The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Gerald J. Baldasty

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 227

View: 939

The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century traces the major transformation of newspapers from a politically based press to a commercially based press in the nineteenth century. Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy, and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift. Increasingly in the nineteenth century, news became a commodity valued more for its profitablility than for its role in informing or persuading the public on political issues. Newspapers started out as highly partisan adjuncts of political parties. As advertisers replaced political parties as the chief financial support of the press, they influenced newspapers in directing their content toward consumers, especially women. The results were recipes, fiction, contests, and features on everything from sports to fashion alongside more standard news about politics. Baldasty makes use of nineteenth-century materials—newspapers from throughout the era, manuscript letters from journalists and politicians, journalism and advertising trade publications, government reports—to document the changing role of the press during the period. He identifies three important phases: the partisan newspapers of the Jacksonian era (1825-1835), the transition of the press in the middle of the century, and the influence of commercialization of the news in the last two decades of the century.

Profits and Losses

Business Journalism and Its Role in Society

Author: Chris Roush

Publisher: Marion Street Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 252

View: 569

Recognizing the historical importance of business news in journalism, this work asserts that current social attitudes were set in place by 20th-century reporting on finance, business trends, markets, unemployment, governmental economic policy, corporate malfeasance, and the consumer. A comprehensive look at the history of American business news reporting--from its conception to today's online news outlets--topics touched upon include breakthroughs in automobile safety; food and drug regulation; and response to problems of pollution, energy, and global trade that remain critical to debates of the future.

Newspaper Confessions

A History of Advice Columns in a Pre-Internet Age

Author: Julie Golia

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 370

"Newspaper Confessions chronicles the history of the newspaper advice column, a genre that has shaped Americans' relationships with media, their experiences with popular therapy, and their virtual interactions across generations. Emerging in the 1890s, advice columns became unprecedented virtual forums where readers could debate the most resonant cultural crises of the day with strangers in an anonymous yet public forum. The columns are important - and overlooked - precursors to today's digital culture: forums, social media groups, chat rooms, and other online communities that define how present-day American communicate with each other. This book charts the rise of the advice column and its impact on the newspaper industry. It analyzes the advice given by a diverse sample of columns across several decades, emphasizing the ways that advice columnists framed their counsel as modern, yet upheld the racial and gendered status quo of the day. It shows how advice columnists were forerunners to the modern celebrity journalist, while also serving as educators to audience of millions. This book includes in-depth case studies of specific columns, demonstrating how these forums transformed into active and participatory virtual communities of confession, advice, debate, and empathy"--

Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 541

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century - reviews, magazines and newspapers - to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new 'profession' of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration. Contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.

Boundaries of Journalism

Professionalism, Practices and Participation

Author: Matt Carlson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 165

The concept of boundaries has become a central theme in the study of journalism. In recent years, the decline of legacy news organizations and the rise of new interactive media tools have thrust such questions as "what is journalism" and "who is a journalist" into the limelight. Struggles over journalism are often struggles over boundaries. These symbolic contests for control over definition also mark a material struggle over resources. In short: boundaries have consequences. Yet there is a lack of conceptual cohesiveness in what scholars mean by the term "boundaries" or in how we should think about specific boundaries of journalism. This book addresses boundaries head-on by bringing together a global array of authors asking similar questions about boundaries and journalism from a diverse range of perspectives, methodologies, and theoretical backgrounds. Boundaries of Journalism assembles the most current research on this topic in one place, thus providing a touchstone for future research within communication, media and journalism studies on journalism and its boundaries.

The Industrial Book, 1840-1880

Author: Scott E. Casper

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Book industries and trade

Page: 539

View: 916

V. 1. The colonial book in the Atlantic world: This book carries the interrelated stories of publishing, writing, and reading from the beginning of the colonial period in America up to 1790. v. 2 An Extensive Republic: This volume documents the development of a distinctive culture of print in the new American republic. v. 3. The industrial book 1840-1880: This volume covers the creation, distribution, and uses of print and books in the mid-nineteenth century, when a truly national book trade emerged. v. 4. Print in Motion: In a period characterized by expanding markets, national consolidation, and social upheaval, print culture picked up momentum as the nineteenth century turned into the twentieth. v. 5. The Enduring Book: This volume addresses the economic, social, and cultural shifts affecting print culture from Word War II to the present.

When News Was New

Author: Terhi Rantanen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 154

View: 967

When News was New investigates how news has re–invented itself at different historical moments––from medieval storytellers to 19th century telegraph news agencies to 21st century bloggers. Tracks the evolution of news through history Explores the regular reconstruction of news, the salability of news, and whether objectivity matters Provides an innovative approach to the history of news; clear, succinct writing; and effective use of photographs, maps, and tables which have strong appeal to the student reader Offers a new way of understanding news in our history and culture

Fractured Modernity

America Confronts Modern Times, 1890s to 1940s

Author: Thomas Welskopp

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 363

The ten essays in this volume deal with the debates and conflicts about modernity in a period of American history when the tensions and strains caused by seemingly unrestrained change and the reactions to it were particularly severe and tangible. Partly concentrating on the margins or dark underworlds of modernity, such as racism and violence, partly focusing on the allegedly unlimited space to negotiate and create social order from scratch, the contributions to this volume show that, and discuss why, modernity was an issue in contemporary United States which seemed to have been even more hotly contested than in Europe at the same time, albeit sometimes in terms of “Americanism” rather than “modernism”. In this book, European scholars of the United States apply variations on the transnational discourse on modernity to unexpected dimensions of U.S. history, making this volume a fascinating example of the present-day enterprise of internationalizing American studies.

Essays in Honour of Michael Bliss

Figuring the Social

Author: Alison Li

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 481

View: 898

A leading public intellectual, Michael Bliss has written prolifically for academic and popular audiences and taught at the University of Toronto from 1968 to 2006. Among his publications are a comprehensive history of the discovery of insulin, and major biographies of Frederick Banting, William Osler, and Harvey Cushing. The essays in this volume, each written by former doctoral students of Bliss, with a foreword by John Fraser and Elizabeth McCallum, do honour to his influence, and, at the same time, reflect upon the writing of history in Canada at the end of the twentieth century. The opening essays discuss Bliss's career, his impact on the study of history, and his academic record. Bliss himself contributes an autobiographical essay that strengthens our understanding of the business of scholarship, teaching, and writing. In the second section, the contributors interrogate public mythmaking in the relationship between politics and business in eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century Canada. Further sections investigate the relationship between fatherhood, religion, and historiography, as well as topics in health and public policy. A final section on 'Medical Science and Practice' deals with subjects ranging from early endocrinology, lobotomy, the mechanical heart, and medical biography as a genre. Going beyond a collection of dedicatory essays, this volume explores the wider subject of writing social and medical history in Canada in the late twentieth century.

Horace Greeley and the Politics of Reform in Nineteenth-century America

Author: Mitchell Snay

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 764

A portrait of the 19th-century reformer, politician and editor of the New York Tribune describes his role in key historical events including the establishment of the Whig and Republican parties, offering insight into how his views were shaped by such factors as the Jacksonian party, antebellum reform and slavery.

Women Who Made the News

Female Journalists in Canada, 1880-1945

Author: Marjory Louise Lang

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 371

View: 453

However, by providing news about women for women they made a distinctly female culture visible within newspapers, chronicling the increasing participation of women in public affairs. Women Who Made the News is the remarkable story of the achievements of those journalists who helped raise women's awareness of each other in the period ending with World War II."--BOOK JACKET.

Literary Celebrity and Public Life in the Nineteenth-Century United States

Author: Bonnie Carr O'Neill

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 678

Through extended readings of the works of P. T. Barnum, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, and Fanny Fern, Bonnie Carr O’Neill shows how celebrity culture authorizes audiences to evaluate public figures on personal terms and in so doing reallocates moral, intellectual, and affective authority and widens the public sphere. O’Neill examines how celebrity culture creates a context in which citizens regard one another as public figures while elevating individual public figures to an unprecedented personal fame. Although this new publicity fosters nationalism, it also imbues public life with personal feeling and transforms the public sphere into a site of divisive, emotionally intense debate. Further, O’Neill analyzes how celebrity culture’s scrutiny of the lives and personalities of public figures collapses distinctions between the public and private spheres and, as a consequence, challenges assumptions about the self and personhood. Celebrity culture intensifies the complex emotions and debates surrounding already-fraught questions of national belonging and democratic participation even as, for some, it provides a means of redefining personhood and cultural identity. O’Neill offers a new critical approach within the growing scholarship on celebrity studies by exploring the relationship between the emergence of celebrity culture and civic discourse. Her careful readings unravel the complexities of a form of publicity that fosters both mass consumption and cultural criticism.

The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism

Author: Stuart Allan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 688

View: 408

The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism presents an authoritative, comprehensive assessment of diverse forms of news media reporting – past, present and future. Including 60 chapters, written by an outstanding team of internationally respected authors, the Companion provides scholars and students with a reliable, historically informed guide to news media and journalism studies. The Companion has the following features: It is organised to address a series of themes pertinent to the on-going theoretical and methodological development of news and journalism studies around the globe. The focus encompasses news institutions, production processes, texts, and audiences. Individual chapters are problem-led, seeking to address ‘real world’ concerns that cast light on an important dimension of news and journalism – and show why it matters. Entries draw on a range of academic disciplines to explore pertinent topics, particularly around the role of journalism in democracy, such as citizenship, power and public trust. Discussion revolves primarily around academic research conducted in the UK and the US, with further contributions from other national contexts - thereby allowing international comparisons to be made. The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism provides an essential guide to key ideas, issues, concepts and debates, while also stressing the value of reinvigorating scholarship with a critical eye to developments in the professional realm. The paperback edition of this Companion includes four new chapters, focusing on news framing, newsmagazines, digital radio news, and social media. Contributors: G. Stuart Adam, Stuart Allan, Chris Atton, Brian Baresch, Geoffrey Baym, W. Lance Bennett, Rodney Benson, S. Elizabeth Bird, R. Warwick Blood, Tanja Bosch, Raymond Boyle, Bonnie Brennen, Qing Cao, Cynthia Carter, Anabela Carvalho, Deborah Chambers, Lilie Chouliaraki, Lisbeth Clausen, James R. Compton, Simon Cottle, Ros Coward, Andrew Crisell, Mark Deuze, Roger Dickinson, Wolfgang Donsbach, Mats Ekström, James S.Ettema, Natalie Fenton, Bob Franklin, Herbert J. Gans, Mark Glaser, Mark Hampton, Joseph Harker, Jackie Harrison, John Hartley, Alfred Hermida, Andrew Hoskins, Shih-Hsien Hsu, Dale Jacquette, Bengt Johansson, Richard Kaplan, Carolyn Kitch, Douglas Kellner, Larsåke Larsson, Justin Lewis, Jake Lynch, Mirca Madianou, Donald Matheson, Heidi Mau, Brian McNair, Kaitlynn Mendes, Máire Messenger Davies, Toby Miller, Martin Montgomery, Marguerite Moritz, Mohammed el-Nawawy, Henrik Örnebring, Julian Petley, Shawn Powers, Greg Philo, Stephen D. Reese, Barry Richards, David Rowe, Philip Seib, Jane B. Singer, Guy Starkey, Linda Steiner, Daya Kishan Thassu, John Tulloch, Howard Tumber, Silvio Waisbord, Gary Whannel, Andrew Williams, Barbie Zelizer

Newsprint Metropolis

City Papers and the Making of Modern Americans

Author: Julia Guarneri

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 687

At the turn of the twentieth century, ambitious publishers like Joseph Pulitzer, William Randolph Hearst, and Robert McCormick produced the most spectacular newspapers Americans had ever read. Alongside current events and classified ads, publishers began running comic strips, sports sections, women’s pages, and Sunday magazines. Newspapers’ lavish illustrations, colorful dialogue, and sensational stories seemed to reproduce city life on the page. Yet as Julia Guarneri reveals, newspapers did not simply report on cities; they also helped to build them. Metropolitan sections and civic campaigns crafted cohesive identities for sprawling metropolises. Real estate sections boosted the suburbs, expanding metropolitan areas while maintaining cities’ roles as economic and information hubs. Advice columns and advertisements helped assimilate migrants and immigrants to a class-conscious, consumerist, and cosmopolitan urban culture. Newsprint Metropolis offers a tour of American newspapers in their most creative and vital decades. It traces newspapers’ evolution into highly commercial, mass-produced media, and assesses what was gained and lost as national syndicates began providing more of Americans’ news. Case studies of Philadelphia, New York, Chicago, and Milwaukee illuminate the intertwined histories of newspapers and the cities they served. In an era when the American press is under attack, Newsprint Metropolis reminds us how papers once hosted public conversations and nurtured collective identities in cities across America.

Seven Events That Made America America

And Proved That the Founding Fathers Were Right All Along

Author: Larry Schweikart

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 814

A conservative historian examines some of the pivotal, yet often ignored, moments that shaped our history All students of American history know the big events that dramatically shaped our country. The Civil War, Pearl Harbor, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and 9/11 are just a few. But there are other, less famous events that had an equally profound impact. Notable conservative historian Larry Schweikart takes an in- depth look at seven of these transformative moments and provides an analysis of how each of them spurred a trend that either confirmed or departed from the vision our Founding Fathers had for America. For instance, he shows how Martin Van Buren's creation of a national political party made it possible for Obama to get elected almost two centuries later and how Dwight Eisenhower's heart attack led to a war on red meat, during which the government took control over Americans' diets. In his easy-to-read yet informative style, Schweikart will not only educate but also surprise readers into reevaluating our history.

Information Needs of Communities

The Changing Media Landscape in a Broadband Age

Author: Steven Waldman

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 465

View: 798

In 2009, a bipartisan Knight Commission found that while the broadband age is enabling an info. and commun. renaissance, local communities in particular are being unevenly served with critical info. about local issues. Soon after the Knight Commission delivered its findings, the FCC initiated a working group to identify crosscurrent and trend, and make recommendations on how the info. needs of communities can be met in a broadband world. This report by the FCC Working Group on the Info. Needs of Communities addresses the rapidly changing media landscape in a broadband age. Contents: Media Landscape; The Policy and Regulatory Landscape; Recommendations. Charts and tables. This is a print on demand report.

Spreading the Word

A History of Information in the California Gold Rush

Author: Richard Thomas Stillson

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 712

A study of the ways in which Americans from the east, who traveled to the "gold country" of California in 18491851, obtained and used information.

History of the Mass Media in the United States

An Encyclopedia

Author: Margaret A. Blanchard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 140

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Murder on Long Island

A Nineteenth-Century Tale of Tragedy & Revenge

Author: Geoffrey K. Fleming

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 131

View: 686

A meticulously researched account of one of the North Fork’s most infamous crimes: the Wickham Axe Murders of 1854. In the mid-nineteenth century, James Wickham was a wealthy farmer with a large estate in Cutchogue, Long Island. His extensive property included a mansion and eighty acres of farmland that were maintained by a staff of servants. In 1854, Wickham got into an argument with one of his workers, Nicholas Behan, after Behan harassed another employee who refused to marry him. Several days after Behan’s dismissal, he crept back into the house in the dead of night. With an axe, he butchered Wickham and his wife, Frances, and fled to a nearby swamp. Behan was captured, tried, convicted and, on December 15, became one of the last people to be hanged in Suffolk County. Local historians Geoffrey Fleming and Amy Folk uncover this gruesome story of revenge and murder. Includes photos! “Mr. Fleming and Ms. Folk graphically recreate the crime itself and Behan’s attempts to escape. They describe in detail his capture, incarceration, trial, and conviction ending in his execution.” —The East Hampton Star