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Author: Hanshan

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 309

View: 618

This authoritative, bilingual edition represents the first time the entirety of Cold Mountain's poetry has been translated into English. These translations were originally published by Copper Canyon Press nearly twenty years ago. Now, significantly revised and expanded, the collection also includes a new preface by the translator, Red Pine, whose accompanying notes are at once scholarly, accessible, and entertaining. Also included for the first time are poems by two of Cold Mountain's colleagues. Legendary for his clarity, directness, and lack of pretension, the eight-century hermit-poet Cold Mountain (Han Shan) is a major figure in the history of Chinese literature and has been a profound influence on writers and readers worldwide. Writers such as Charles Frazier and Gary Snyder studied his poetry, and Jack Kerouac's Dharma Bums is dedicated "to Han Shan." 1.B storied cliffs were the fortune I cast bird trails beyond human tracks what surrounds my yard white clouds nesting dark rocks I've lived here quite a few years and always seen the spring-water change tell those people with tripods and bells empty names are no damn good 71. someone sits in a mountain gorge cloud robe sunset tassels handful of fragrances he'd share the road is long and hard regretful and doubtful old and unaccomplished the crowd calls him crippled he stands alone steadfast 205. my place is on Cold Mountain perched on a cliff beyond the circuit of affliction images leave no trace when they vanish I roam the whole galaxy from here lights and shadows flash across my mind not one dharma comes before me since I found the magic pearl I can go anywhere everywhere it's perfect Cold Mountain A mountain man lives under thatch before his gate carts and horses are rare the forest is quiet but partial to birds the streams are wide and home to fish with his son he picks wild fruit with his wife he hoes between rocks what does he have at home a shelf full of nothing but books

The Collected Songs of Cold Mountain

Author: Cold Mountain (Han Shan)

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 208

View: 427

This authoritative, bilingual edition represents the first time the entirety of Cold Mountain's poetry has been translated into English. These translations were originally published by Copper Canyon Press nearly twenty years ago. Now, significantly revised and expanded, the collection also includes a new preface by the translator, Red Pine, whose accompanying notes are at once scholarly, accessible, and entertaining. Also included for the first time are poems by two of Cold Mountain's colleagues. Legendary for his clarity, directness, and lack of pretension, the eight-century hermit-poet Cold Mountain (Han Shan) is a major figure in the history of Chinese literature and has been a profound influence on writers and readers worldwide. Writers such as Charles Frazier and Gary Snyder studied his poetry, and Jack Kerouac's Dharma Bums is dedicated "to Han Shan." 1.B storied cliffs were the fortune I cast bird trails beyond human tracks what surrounds my yard white clouds nesting dark rocks I've lived here quite a few years and always seen the spring-water change tell those people with tripods and bells empty names are no damn good 71. someone sits in a mountain gorge cloud robe sunset tassels handful of fragrances he'd share the road is long and hard regretful and doubtful old and unaccomplished the crowd calls him crippled he stands alone steadfast 205. my place is on Cold Mountain perched on a cliff beyond the circuit of affliction images leave no trace when they vanish I roam the whole galaxy from here lights and shadows flash across my mind not one dharma comes before me since I found the magic pearl I can go anywhere everywhere it's perfect Cold Mountain A mountain man lives under thatch before his gate carts and horses are rare the forest is quiet but partial to birds the streams are wide and home to fish with his son he picks wild fruit with his wife he hoes between rocks what does he have at home a shelf full of nothing but books

The Mountain Poems of Stonehouse

Author: Stonehouse

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 70

View: 603

A bilingual Chinese-English volume of mountain poems from a Zen master.

Guide to Capturing a Plum Blossom

Author: Sung Po-jen

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 216

View: 983

"It is one of the very first art books which helped artists develop the aptitude for seeing the inner essence of various natural phenomena."—Shambhala Sun "Guide to Capturing a Plum Blossomcould fit neatly into any number of contemporary-sounding categories: hybrid text, art book, lyric essay, etc. It is a book that relies on interdependence of image and text, of history and the present, of evocation and concrete image."—The Rumpus "Red Pine introduces Western readers to both the text itself and the traditions it has inherited."—Virginia Quarterly Review Through a series of brief four-lined poems and illustrations, Sung Po-jen aims at training artistic perception: how to trulyseea plum blossom. First published in AD 1238,Guide to Capturing a Plum Blossomis considered the world's earliest-known printed art books. This bilingual edition contains the one hundred woodblock prints from the 1238 edition, calligraphic Chinese poems, and Red Pine's graceful translations and illuminating commentaries. "Tiger Tracks" winter wind bends dry grass flicks its tail along the ridge fearful force on the loose don't try to braid old whiskers Red Pine's commentary: "The Chinese liken the north wind that blows down from Siberia in winter to a roaring tiger. China is home to both the Siberian and the South China tigers. While both are on the verge of extinction, the small South China tiger still appears as far north as the Chungnan Mountains, where hermits have shown me their tracks." Sung Po-jenwas a Chinese poet of the thirteenth century. Red Pine(a.k.a. Bill Porter) is one of the world's foremost translators of Chinese poetry and religious texts. His published translations includeThe Collected Songs of Cold Mountain,Lao-tzu's Taoteching, andPoems of the Masters. He lives near Seattle, Washington.

Finding Them Gone

Visiting China's Poets of the Past

Author: Red Pine

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 398

View: 271

"A travel writer with a cult following."—The New York Times "There are very few westerners who could successfully cover so much territory in China, but Porter pulls it off. Finding Them Gone uniquely draws upon his parallel careers as a translator and a travel writer in ways that his previous books have not. A lifetime devoted to understanding Chinese culture and spirituality blossoms within its pages to create something truly rare."—The Los Angeles Book Review To pay homage to China's greatest poets, renowned translator Bill Porter—who is also known by his Chinese name "Red Pine"—traveled throughout China visiting dozens of poets' graves and performing idiosyncratic rituals that featured Kentucky bourbon and reading poems aloud to the spirits. Combining travelogue, translations, history, and personal stories, this intimate and fast-paced tour of modern China celebrates inspirational landscapes and presents translations of classical poems, many of which have never before been translated into English. Porter is a former radio commentator based in Hong Kong who specialized in travelogues. As such, he is an entertaining storyteller who is deeply knowledgeable about Chinese culture, both ancient and modern, who brings readers into the journey—from standing at the edge of the trash pit that used to be Tu Mu's grave to sitting in Han Shan's cave where the Buddhist hermit "Butterfly Woman" serves him tea. Illustrated with over one hundred photographs and two hundred poems, Finding Them Gone combines the love of travel with an irrepressible exuberance for poetry. As Porter writes: "The graves of the poets I'd been visiting were so different. Some were simple, some palatial, some had been plowed under by farmers, and others had been reduced to trash pits. Their poems, though, had survived... Poetry is transcendent. We carry it in our hearts and find it there when we have forgotten everything else." In praise of Bill Porter/Red Pine: "In the travel writing that has made him so popular in China, Porter's tone is not reverential but explanatory, and filled with luminous asides... His goal is to tell interested foreigners about revealing byways of Chinese culture."—New York Review of Books “Porter is an amiable and knowledgeable guide. The daily entries themselves fit squarely in the travelogue genre, seamlessly combining the details of his routes and encounters with the poets’ biographies, Chinese histories, and a generous helping of the poetry itself. Porter’s knowledge of the subject and his curation of the poems make this book well worth reading for travelers and poetry readers alike. It’s like a survey course in Chinese poetry—but one in which the readings are excellent, the professor doesn’t take himself too seriously, and the field trips involve sharing Stagg bourbon with the deceased.”—Publishers Weekly "Red Pine's out-of-the-mainstream work is canny and clearheaded, and it has immeasurably enhanced Zen/Taoist literature and practice."—Kyoto Journal "Bill Porter has been one of the most prolific translators of Chinese texts, while also developing into a travel writer with a cult following."—The New York Times "Red Pine's succinct and informative notes for each poem are core samples of the cultural, political, and literary history of China." —Asian Reporter Poets’ graves visited (partial list): Li Pai, Tu Fu, Wang Wei, Su Tung-p’o, Hsueh T’ao, Chia Tao, Wei Ying-wu, Shih-wu (Stonehouse), Han-shan (Cold Mountain). Bill Porter (a.k.a. "Red Pine") is widely recognized as one of the world's finest translators of Chinese religious and poetic texts. His best-selling books inc

The Shorter Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature

Author: Victor H. Mair

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 704

View: 501

With its fresh translations by newer voices in the field, its broad scope, and its flowing style, this anthology places the immense riches of Chinese literature within easy reach. Ranging from the beginnings to 1919, this abridged version of The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature retains all the characteristics of the original. In putting together these selections Victor H. Mair interprets "literature" very broadly to include not just literary fiction, poetry, and drama, but folk and popular literature, lyrics and arias, elegies and rhapsodies, biographies, autobiographies and memoirs, letters, criticism and theory, and travelogues and jokes.

The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma

Author: Bodhidharma

Publisher: North Point Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 144

View: 984

A fifth-century Indian Buddhist monk, Bodhidharma is credited with bringing Zen to China. Although the tradition that traces its ancestry back to him did not flourish until nearly two hundred years after his death, today millions of Zen Buddhists and students of kung fu claim him as their spiritual father. While others viewed Zen practice as a purification of the mind or a stage on the way to perfect enlightenment, Bodhidharma equated Zen with buddhahood and believed that it had a place in everyday life. Instead of telling his disciples to purify their minds, he pointed them to rock walls, to the movements of tigers and cranes, to a hollow reed floating across the Yangtze. This bilingual edition, the only volume of the great teacher's work currently available in English, presents four teachings in their entirety. "Outline of Practice" describes the four all-inclusive habits that lead to enlightenment, the "Bloodstream Sermon" exhorts students to seek the Buddha by seeing their own nature, the "Wake-up Sermon" defends his premise that the most essential method for reaching enlightenment is beholding the mind. The original Chinese text, presented on facing pages, is taken from a Ch'ing dynasty woodblock edition.

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Author: Peter France

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 656

View: 746

Translation has been a crucial process in world culture over the past two millennia and more. In the English-speaking cultures many of the most important texts are translations, from Homer to Beckett, the Bible to Freud. Although recent years have seen a boom in translation studies, there has been no comprehensive yet convenient guide to this essential element of literature in English. Written by eminent scholars from many countries, the Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation meets this need and will be essential reading for all students of English and comparative literature. It highlights the place of translation in our culture, encouraging awareness of the issues raised, making the translator more visible. Concentrating on major writers and works, it covers translations out of many languages, from Greek to Korean, from Swahili to Russian. For some works (e.g. Virgil's Aeneid) which have been much translated, the discussion is historical and critical, showing how translation has evolved over the centuries and bringing out the differences between versions. Elsewhere, with less familiar literatures, the Guide examines the extent to which translation has done justice to the range of work available. The Guide is divided into two parts. Part I contains substantial essays on theoretical questions, a pioneering outline of the history of translation into English, and discussions of the problems raised by specific types of text (e.g. poetry, oralliterature). The second, much longer, part consists of entries grouped by language of origin; some are devoted to individual texts (e.g. the Thousand and One Nights) or writers (e.g. Ibsen, Proust), but the majority offer a critical overview of a genre (e.g. Chinese poetry, Spanish Golden Age drama) or of a national literature (e.g. Hungarian, Scottish Gaelic). There is a selective bibliography for each entry and an index of authors and translators.

Daughters of Emptiness

Poems of Chinese Buddhist Nuns

Author: Beata Grant

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 208

View: 133

Women played major roles in the history of Buddhist China, but given the paucity of the remaining records, their voices have all but faded. In Daughters of Emptiness, Beata Grant renders a great service by recovering and translating the enchanting verse - by turns assertive, observant, devout - of forty-eight nuns from sixteen centuries of imperial China. This selection of poems, along with the brief biographical accounts that accompany them, affords readers a glimpse into the extraordinary diversity and sometimes startling richness of these women's lives. A sample poem for this stunning collection: The sequence of seasons naturally pushes forward, Suddenly I am startled by the ending of the year. Lifting my eyes I catch sight of the winter crows, Calling mournfully as if wanting to complain. The sunlight is cold rather than gentle, Spreading over the four corners like a cloud. A cold wind blows fitfully in from the north, Its sad whistling filling courtyards and houses. Head raised, I gaze in the direction of Spring, But Spring pays no attention to me at all. Time a galloping colt glimpsed through a crack, The tap [of Death] at the door has its predestined time. How should I not know, one who has left the world, And for whom floating clouds are already familiar? In the garden there grows a rosary-plum tree: Whose sworn friendship makes it possible to endure. - Chan Master Jingnuo

Living at the Monastery, Working in the Kitchen

Poems

Author: Eric Paul Shaffer

Publisher: Leaping Dog Press/Asylum

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 72

View: 887

Living at the Monastery, Working in the Kitchen contains poems of funny, fleeting enlightenment ignited more by close, current, continuous observation of the ordinary than by assuming a permanent pinnacle of wisdom. Written in the voice of Shih-te, cook and janitor at Kuo-ch'sing monastery during the T'sang Dynasty and chum to the famed Han-shan (Cold Mountain), these lines spit fire and savor salt.