The Civilizing Process: The history of manners

Author: Norbert Elias

Publisher: New York : Urizen Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 184

The Civilizing Process stands out as Norbert Elias' greatest work, tracing the 'civilizing' of manners and personality in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and showing how this was related to the formation of states and the monopolization of power within them. It comprises the two volumes originally published in English as The History of Manners and State Formation and Civilization, now, in a single volume, the book is restored to its original format and made available world-wide to a new generation of readers.In this new edition, the original text is extensively revised, corrected, and updated. The Revised Edition reveals anew and afresh the greatness of Elias' masterpiece.

The Civilizing Process

Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations

Author: Norbert Elias

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 548

The Civilizing Process stands out as Norbert Elias' greatest work, tracing the "civilizing" of manners and personality in Western Europe since the late Middle Ages by demonstrating how the formation of states and the monopolization of power within them changed Western society forever.

The Civilizing Process: Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations, Revised Edition

Author: Norbert Elias

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 148

The Civilizing Process stands out as Norbert Elias' greatest work, tracing the "civilizing" of manners and personality in Western Europe since the late Middle Ages by demonstrating how the formation of states and the monopolization of power within them changed Western society forever.

Sport and Leisure in the Civilizing Process

Critique and Counter-critique

Author: Eric Dunning

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 289

View: 948

Figurational sociology is associated with the writings of Norbert Elias. In his theory of 'the civilizing process' and his work on the activity of sociology, Elias devised an approach to the study of human life which is now recognized as one of the major contributions to twentieth-century social science. Working in collaboration with Eric Dunning, Elias developed a series of writings on sport and leisure. These have been so influential that in some circles they are identified as the leading approach in the field. However, the figurational approach has also been widely criticized. For some critics it exhibits all of the worst features of the now discredited 'liberal,' 'functionalist' school of sociology. This collection provides a major critical assessment of the figurational approach to our understanding of sport and leisure. Contributors explore the distinctive features of such an approach and show its application to matters of sport and leisure. However, this is not a one-sided collection. The editors invited critics of figurational sociology to set out their points of view. Feminist and neo-Marxist contributors, for example, spell out why they judge the approach to be of limited value. The concluding chapter, written by Eric Dunning, offers a major statement of what figurational sociologists argue and how their arguments differ from other leading approaches both generally and in the field of sport and leisure. This unique and accessible collection is an important contribution to the growing area of sport and leisure studies.

The Colonial 'civilizing Process' in Dutch Formosa

1624 - 1662

Author: Chiu Hsin-Hui

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 627

Focusing on Formosan agency in the encounter with Dutch colonialism and Chinese encroachment, this book reveals a fascinating picture of Taiwan in the early modern era.

The American Civilizing Process

Author: Stephen Mennell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 407

Since 9/11, the American government has presumed to speak and act in the name of ‘civilization’. But isthat how the rest of the world sees it? And if not, why not? Stephen Mennell leads up to such contemporary questions through a careful study of the whole span of American development, from the first settlers to the American Empire. He takes a novel approach, analysing the USA’s experience in the light of Norbert Elias’s theory of civilizing (and decivilizing) processes. Drawing comparisons between the USA and other countries of the world, the topics discussed include: American manners and lifestyles Violence in American society The impact of markets on American social character American expansion, from the frontier to empire The ‘curse of the American Dream’ and increasing inequality The religiosity of American life Mennell shows how the long-term experience of Americans has been of growing more and more powerful in relation to their neighbours. This has had all-pervasive effects on the way they see themselves, their perception of the rest of the world, and how the rest of the world sees them. Mennell’s compelling and provocative account will appeal to anyone concerned about America's role in the world today, including students and scholars of American politics and society.

Un-civilizing Processes?

Excess and Transgression in German Society and Culture: Perspectives Debating with Norbert Elias

Author: Mary Fulbrook

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 517

The collapse of the supposedly 'civilized' German nation into the 'barbarism' of Hitler's Third Reich has cast a long shadow over interpretations of German culture and society. In the remarkable work of Norbert Elias, himself a refugee from Nazi Germany, a deep concern with the distinctiveness of 'the Germans' is linked with an ambitious attempt to work out more general relations between broad historical processes – patterns of state formation, changing social structures – and the character of the individual self, as evidenced in changing thresholds of shame and embarrassment. In critical engagement with Elias's notion of the 'civilizing process', the essays collected here explore moments of excess and transgression, moments when the very boundaries of 'civilization' are both constructed and challenged. Inter-disciplinary contributions – on topics ranging from medieval laughter, cursing and swearing, through to music, the bourgeois self, and aspects of modern violence – highlight the complexity of inter-relations between the individual imagination and creativity, on the one hand, and the brute facts of political power and social structural inequalities, on the other; and develop new insights into the changing patterns of culture and society in Germany from the Middle Ages to the present.