Creation and the History of Science

Author: Christopher B. Kaiser

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Creation

Page: 316

View: 308

Examines the relationship between the theology of creation and the history of science.

The Genesis of Science

How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution

Author: James Hannam

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 666

The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science. Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.

Religion and Science

History, Method, Dialogue

Author: W. Mark Richardson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 470

View: 659

Emphasizing its historical, methodological and constructive dimensions, Religion and Science takes the pulse of pertinent current research as the interdisciplinary study of science and religion gains momentum.

When Science and Christianity Meet

Author: David C. Lindberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 724

This book, in language accessible to the general reader, investigates twelve of the most notorious, most interesting, and most instructive episodes involving the interaction between science and Christianity, aiming to tell each story in its historical specificity and local particularity. Among the events treated in When Science and Christianity Meet are the Galileo affair, the seventeenth-century clockwork universe, Noah's ark and flood in the development of natural history, struggles over Darwinian evolution, debates about the origin of the human species, and the Scopes trial. Readers will be introduced to St. Augustine, Roger Bacon, Pope Urban VIII, Isaac Newton, Pierre-Simon de Laplace, Carl Linnaeus, Charles Darwin, T. H. Huxley, Sigmund Freud, and many other participants in the historical drama of science and Christianity. “Taken together, these papers provide a comprehensive survey of current thinking on key issues in the relationships between science and religion, pitched—as the editors intended—at just the right level to appeal to students.”—Peter J. Bowler, Isis

Science and Religion Around the World

Author: John Hedley Brooke

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 158

The past quarter-century has seen an explosion of interest in the history of science and religion. But all too often the scholars writing it have focused their attention almost exclusively on the Christian experience, with only passing reference to other traditions of both science and faith. At a time when religious ignorance and misunderstanding have lethal consequences, such provincialism must be avoided and, in this pioneering effort to explore the historical relations of what we now call "science" and "religion," the authors go beyond the Abrahamic traditions to examine the way nature has been understood and manipulated in regions as diverse as ancient China, India, and sub-Saharan Africa. Science and Religion around the World also provides authoritative discussions of science in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam -- as well as an exploration of the relationship between science and the loss of religious beliefs. The narratives included in this book demonstrate the value of plural perspectives and of the importance of location for the construction and perception of science-religion relations.

Three Views on Christianity and Science

Author: Zondervan,

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 270

When it comes to relating Christianity to modern Western culture, perhaps no topic is more controversial than the relationship between Christianity and science. Outside the church, the myth of an age-old conflict between science and Christianity is nearly ubiquitous in popular culture and can poison the well before a fruitful dialogue can begin. Within the church, opposing viewpoints on the relation between Christianity and science often lead to division and rancor. Three Views on Christianity and Science addresses both types of conflict. Featuring leading evangelical representatives, it presents three primary options for the compatibility of Christianity and science and models constructive dialogue on the surrounding controversial issues. The highlighted contributors and their views are: Michael Ruse, Independence View--When functioning correctly, science and Christian theology operate independently of each other, seeking answers to different questions through different means. Alister McGrath, Dialogue View--Though the natural sciences and Christian philosophy and theology function differently, they can and should inform each other. Bruce L. Gordon, Constrained Integration View--Science, philosophy, and theology all contribute to our understanding of reality. Their interactions constrain each other and together present an optimally coherent and integrated picture of reality. By engaging with the viewpoints of the contributors, readers will come away with a deeper understanding of the compatibility of science and Christianity, as well as of the positions of those who disagree with them. Scholars, students, pastors, and interested laypeople will be able to make use of this material in research, assignments, sermons and lessons, evangelism, and apologetics.

Science and Religion

A Historical Introduction

Author: Gary B. Ferngren

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 496

View: 530

Weissenbacher, Stephen P. Weldon, and Tomoko Yoshida

Understanding Scientific Theories of Origins

Cosmology, Geology, and Biology in Christian Perspective

Author: Robert C. Bishop

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 688

View: 592

From five authors with over two decades of experience teaching origins together in the classroom, this is the first textbook to offer a full-fledged discussion of the scientific narrative of origins from the Big Bang through humankind, from biblical and theological perspectives. This work gives the reader a detailed picture of mainstream scientific theories of origins along with how they fit into the story of God's creative and redemptive action.

Roman Catholicism and Modern Science

A History

Author: Don O'Leary

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 356

View: 413

Presents a history of the controversial views of the Roman Catholic Church about the discoveries of modern science from the eighteenth century up to the present, covering such topics as evolution, contraception, stem cell research, and organ transplants.

Healing Through Christian Science

Discourses and Editorials ; Christian Science History : a Statement of Facts Relating to the Authorship of the Christian Science Textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures

Author: Septimus James Hanna

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Christian Science

Page: 75

View: 779

An Alchemical Quest for Universal Knowledge

The ‘Christian Philosophy’ of Jan Baptist Van Helmont (1579-1644)

Author: Georgiana D. Hedesan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 964

History of science credits the Flemish physician, alchemist and philosopher Jan Baptist Van Helmont (1579-1644) for his contributions to the development of chemistry and medicine. Yet, as this book makes clear, focussing on Van Helmont's impact on modern science does not do justice to the complexity of his thought or to his influence on successive generations of intellectuals like Robert Boyle or Gottfried Leibniz. Revealing Van Helmont as an original thinker who sought to produce a post-Scholastic synthesis of religion and natural philosophy, Georgiana Hedesan reconstructs his ambitious quest for universal knowledge as it emerges from the text of the Ortus medicinae (1648). Published after Van Helmont's death by his son, the work can best be understood as a compilation of finished and unfinished treatises, the historical product of a life unsettled by religious persecution and personal misfortune. The present book provides a coherent account of Van Helmont's philosophy by analysing its main tenets. Divided into two parts, the study opens with a background to Van Helmont's concept of an alchemical Christian philosophy, demonstrating that his outlook was deeply grounded in the tradition of medical alchemy as reformed by Theophrastus von Hohenheim, called Paracelsus (1493-1541). It then reconstitutes Van Helmont's biography, while giving a historical dimension to his intellectual output. The second part reconstructs Van Helmont's Christian philosophy, investigating his views on God, nature and man, as well as his applied philosophy. Hedesan also provides an account of the development of Van Helmont's thought throughout his life. The conclusion sums up Van Helmont's intellectual achievement and highlights avenues of future research.

Science and Religion

A Historical Introduction

Author: Gary B. Ferngren

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 401

View: 238

Written by distinguished historians of science and religion, the thirty essays in this volume survey the relationship of Western religious traditions to science from the beginning of the Christian era to the late twentieth century. This wide-ranging collection also introduces a variety of approaches to understanding their intersection, suggesting a model not of inalterable conflict, but of complex interaction. Tracing the rise of science from its birth in the medieval West through the scientific revolution, the contributors describe major shifts that were marked by discoveries such as those of Copernicus, Galileo, and Isaac Newton and the Catholic and Protestant reactions to them. They assess changes in scientific understanding brought about by eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transformations in geology, cosmology, and biology, together with the responses of both mainstream religious groups and such newer movements as evangelicalism and fundamentalism. The book also treats the theological implications of contemporary science and evaluates recent approaches such as environmentalism, gender studies, social construction, and postmodernism, which are at the center of current debates in the historiography, understanding, and application of science. Contributors: Colin A. Russell, David B. Wilson, Edward Grant, David C. Lindberg, Alnoor Dhanani, Owen Gingerich, Richard J. Blackwell, Edward B. Davis, Michael P. Winship, John Henry, Margaret J. Osler, Richard S. Westfall, John Hedley Brooke, Nicolaas A. Rupke, Peter M. Hess, James Moore, Peter J. Bowler, Ronald L. Numbers, Steven J. Harris, Mark A. Noll, Edward J. Larson, Richard Olson, Craig Sean McConnell, Robin Collins, William A. Dembski, David N. Livingstone, Sara Miles, and Stephen P. Weldon.

Jesuit Contribution to Science

A History

Author: Agustín Udías

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 277

View: 634

This book presents a comprehensive history of the many contributions the Jesuits made to science from their founding to the present. It also links the Jesuits dedication to science with their specific spirituality which tries to find God in all things. The book begins with Christopher Clavius, professor of mathematics in the Roman College between 1567 and 1595, the initiator of this tradition. It covers Jesuits scientific contributions in mathematics, astronomy, physics and cartography up until the suppression of the order by the Pope in 1773. Next, the book details the scientific work the Jesuits pursued after their restoration in 1814. It examines the establishment of a network of observatories throughout the world; details contributions made to the study of tropical hurricanes, earthquakes and terrestrial magnetism and examines such important figures as Angelo Secchi, Stephen J. Perry, James B. Macelwane and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. From their founding to the present, Jesuits have trodden an uncommon path to the frontiers where the Christian message is not yet known. Jesuits’ work in science is also an interesting chapter in the general problem of the relation between science and religion. This book provides readers with a complete portrait of the Jesuit scientific tradition. Its engaging story will appeal to those with an interest in the history of science, the history of the relations between science and religion and the history of Jesuits.

The Biblical Basis for Modern Science

Author: Henry Morris

Publisher: New Leaf Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Bibles

Page: 474

View: 608

For decades, Henry Morris has been known as a defender of the Christian faith. It's an auspicious title for such a humble man, yet no one can deny that the grasp Morris has on science and faith issues is staggering. In this updated classic, Morris walks the reader through history "real history" by showing the absurdity of evolution. From a wide variety of sciences, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, and geology, Morris presents clear evidence that the Bible gives us an astonishingly accurate record of the past, present, and future.

Slaying the Dragons

Destroying Myths in the History of Science and Faith

Author: Allan Chapman

Publisher: Lion Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 670

Are science and faith, particularly Christianity, inevitably in conflict, as the New Atheists proclaim? Have they not always been so? Weren't early scientists hounded for their discoveries until Darwin burst on the scene and sent faith packing? Not if you look at the facts, says Dr Allan Chapman, who teaches the History of Science at the University of Oxford. History shows us that Galileo was not the victim of Church persecution - nor did Huxley 'win' the debate with Wilberforce. Drawing on contemporary sources, Dr Chapman proves that the history of science and of faith always have been closely intertwined. From the leading scientists of medieval times, many in Holy Orders, to the seventeenth-century Popes who maintained an astronomical observatory in the Vatican, to the Christian people of science today, science and faith have grown up together.

A History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom, Vol. I (in Two Volumes)

Author: Andrew D. White

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 446

View: 168

The battle between science and religion in American popular life is as old as America itself. By the late 19th century, it had reached a fever pitch, culminating in the two-volume 1896 work A History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom. The result of thirty years of research by historian and educator ANDREW DICKSON WHITE (1832-1918), a founder of Cornell University, this is White's attack on intellectually stifling religious dogma and his explication of the "conflict thesis" of outright warfare between science and religion. While scholars today generally see the situation as more nuanced, the conflict thesis remains a popular metaphor in the mind of the general public, and White's work continues to speak to us today. H.L. Mencken called this "one of the noblest monuments of American scholarship," and it will fascinate anyone who is troubled by the ongoing influence by religious authorities into secular science. In Volume I, White looks at the transformation of our understanding of the world from a primarily religious one of divine creation to a primarily scientific one informed by evolution, astronomy, and biology.

History of the Christian Church From the Reformation to the Present Time, Vol. 1 of 4

Author: Johann Heinrich Kurtz

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 524

View: 404

Excerpt from History of the Christian Church From the Reformation to the Present Time, Vol. 1 of 4 In the Reformation of the sixteenth century, the Germanic spirit, which, until then, had been under the tutelage and discipline of the Romish Church, attained to maturity and independence. It fully emancipated itself from the bondage of its master, who had become an ambitious oppressor, and had made every effort to suppress all independent attempts to secure ecclesiastical, theological, and scientific freedom - all movements in favour of evangelical reforms. In the primitive history of the Church, the person of Christ was made the centre of salvation, and the Holy Scriptures were set forth as the source of all announcements and knowledge of salvation. The development of Christianity was impelled in the ancient Church by tradition, in the mediæval by the hierarchy, in the modern by science. Tradition represents the continued agency of the Holy Ghost in the Church; the hierarchy represents Christ's supremacy over the Church. By the former the catholicity of the Church was developed; the latter protected the Church against the storms which arose amid the conflicts of the ancient and modern world, and secured its perpetuation. But both tradition and the hierarchy transcended their proper limits; hence upon modern science devolved the duty of leading men back to the fountain of salvation in Christ, and of the knowledge of that salvation in the Scriptures, that thus the truth might be sifted of falsehood, and that which was normal be separated from abnormal developments in the history of the Church. This happened in the Reformation. Not that science produced the Reformation, for it was rather called forth by deep anxieties for the salvation of the soul, against which Romish tradition had sealed the Sacred Scriptures, and Romish indulgences and justification by works had barred faith in Christ. But the Reformation became the most zealous patron of science, because science furnished the means of discovering, establishing, and perfecting the principles of true reform. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Creationists

From Scientific Creationism to Intelligent Design

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 606

View: 427

In light of the embattled status of evolutionary theory, particularly as "intelligent design" makes headway against Darwinism in the schools and in the courts, this now classic account of the roots of creationism assumes new relevance. Expanded and updated to account for the appeal of intelligent design and the global spread of creationism, The Creationists offers a thorough, clear, and balanced overview of the arguments and figures at the heart of the debate. Praised by both creationists and evolutionists for its comprehensiveness, the book meticulously traces the dramatic shift among Christian fundamentalists from acceptance of the earth's antiquity to the insistence of present-day scientific creationists that most fossils date back to Noah's flood and its aftermath. Focusing especially on the rise of this "flood geology," Ronald L. Numbers chronicles the remarkable resurgence of antievolutionism since the 1960s, as well as the creationist movement's tangled religious roots in the theologies of late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Baptists, Presbyterians, Lutherans, and Adventists, among others. His book offers valuable insight into the origins of various "creation science" think tanks and the people behind them. It also goes a long way toward explaining how creationism, until recently viewed as a "peculiarly American" phenomenon, has quietly but dynamically spread internationally--and found its expression outside Christianity in Judaism and Islam.