The Charlton Men

Author: Paul Breen

Publisher: Thames River Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 248

View: 387

‘The Charlton Men’, the first part of a trilogy set in South London, combines literary fiction with a love of football. Set in the historic surrounds of Greenwich and Charlton, the novel interweaves the rich heritage of the area’s past with contemporary themes of social disenfranchisement and a search for meaning. Set in the aftermath of the 2011 London riots, the story follows two “Charlton Men” as their lives become intertwined with the fortunes of their local football club. Lance, a Londoner, has followed Charlton his whole life – from childhood right up until his return from Afghanistan, scarred by war and feeling abandoned after the sacrifices he has made for his country. Fergus, an Irishman, comes to London to get a fresh start on life and finds himself falling in love not once, but twice – first with the club and the riots, and second with a mysterious Marilyn Monroe lookalike whose darker side ripples beneath the surface. Conflict arises, however, when his friend Lance falls for the same woman and the two men find themselves pitted against one another as competitors for her affection.

Charlton Athletic FC

A History

Author: David Ramzan

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 767

For Charlton Athletic Football Club supporters, their club will always be a part of their lives. A Charlton supporter since the mid-1960s, David Ramzan has seen some of the best and worst of times from playing in the old Second Division, dropping into the Third, ground sharing with local rivals, promotion to the First Division, then relegation and later promotion in the most dramatic final ever played at the home of English football. On a roller-coaster football journey, the club has always been an integral part of the local community, where organisations run by fans have grown alongside the club since it was first formed in 1905. In Charlton Athletic: A History produced with the assistance of members of the Former Players Association, the club, supporters groups and associated organisations David Ramzan charts the history of the South East London club and also those groups, whether independent or part of the establishment, that have made Charlton Athletic one of the most respected clubs in the world of football.

The Scottish Highland Series

Beloved Impostor, Beloved Stranger, and Beloved Warrior

Author: Patricia Potter

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1060

View: 311

A trio of courageous brothers face danger and love in sixteenth-century Scotland in these three enthralling romances from a USA Today–bestselling author. The men of the Maclean Clan are fierce warriors. From the battle of Flodden Field to the waters off the Spanish Coast, they fight to protect their homes and those they love. In this spellbinding Scottish Highland series, the Maclean brothers find unexpected romance with women who heal and stir their souls. Beloved Imposter: Felicia Campbell has set a plan in motion to escape her wedding to the lecherous old Earl of Morneith—but she’s interrupted when she’s abducted. Her fury turns to curiosity when she discovers her captor is the handsome Rory Maclean, her clan’s hated enemy. And Rory, who has sworn never to love again, finds himself daring to care for the fiery captive who could save his broken soul . . . Beloved Stranger: Lachlan Maclean rode with King James IV of Scotland to free his country from English tyranny. In the slaughter at Flodden Field, he’s thrown from his horse and awakes to the beautiful visage of Kimbra Carlton, a border woman whose husband was killed by a Scot, leaving her to fend for her daughter alone. Now, she can neither let the wounded Lachlan die nor let anyone know his heritage. But perhaps in healing him, she may heal her own heart . . . Beloved Warrior: Patrick Maclean spent years enslaved aboard a Spanish galleon. But after he leads his fellow oarsmen in an uprising, he finds himself in charge of not only the vessel but also a fetching young passenger: Juliana Mendoza, the ship owner’s niece. Juliana was bound for a wedding and a man she never wanted. But the more she comes to know Patrick and his honorable clan, the more she realizes that only she can decide her fate . . .

Why Minorities Play or Don't Play Soccer

A Global Exploration

Author: Kausik Bandyopadhyay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 789

Soccer, the most popular mass spectator sport in the world, has always remained a marker of identities of various sorts. Behind the façade of its obvious entertainment aspect, it has proved to be a perpetuating reflector of nationalism, ethnicity, community or communal identity, and cultural specificity. Naturally therefore, the game is a complex representative of minorities’ status especially in countries where minorities play a crucial role in political, social, cultural or economic life. The question is also important since in many nations success in sports like soccer has been used as an instrument for assimilation or to promote an alternative brand of nationalism. Thus, Jewish teams in pre-Second World War Europe were set up to promote the idea of a muscular Jewish identity. Similarly, in apartheid South Africa, soccer became the game of the black majority since it was excluded from the two principal games of the country – rugby and cricket. In India, on the other hand, the Muslim minorities under colonial rule appropriated soccer to assert their community-identity. The book examines why in certain countries, minorities chose to take up the sport while in others they backed away from participating in the game or, alternatively, set up their own leagues and practised self-exclusion. The book examines European countries like the Netherlands, England and France, the USA, Africa, Australia and the larger countries of Asia – particularly India. This book was previously published as a special issue of Soccer and Society.

Zimmer Men

The Trials and Tribulations of the Ageing Cricketer

Author: Marcus Berkmann

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 572

Ten years after his classic Rain Men - 'cricket's answer to Fever Pitch,' said the Daily Telegraph - Marcus Berkmann returns to the strange and wondrous world of village cricket, where players sledge their team-mates, umpires struggle to count up to six, the bails aren't on straight and the team that fields after a hefty tea invariably loses. This time he's on the trail of the Ageing Cricketer, having suddenly realised that he is one himself and playing in a team with ten others every weekend. In their minds they run around the field as fast as ever; it's only their legs that let them down. ZIMMER MEN asks all the important questions of middle-aged cricketers. Why is that boundary rope suddenly so far away? Are you doomed to getting worse as a cricketer, or could you get better? How many pairs of trousers will your girth destroy in one summer? Chronicling the 2004 season, with its many humiliating defeats and random injuries, this coruscatingly funny new book laughs in the face of middle age, and starts thinking seriously about buying a convertible.

The Whispering Roots

Author: Cecil Day Lewis

Publisher: Jonathan Cape

ISBN:

Category: English poetry

Page: 58

View: 423