The Changing Politics of Organic Food in North America

Author: Lisa F. Clark

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 190

The Changing Politics of Organic Food in North America explores the political dynamics of the remarkable transition of organic food from a Ôfringe fadÕ in the 1960s to a multi-billion dollar industry in the 2000s. Taking a multidisciplinary, institutio

Food in America: The Past, Present, and Future of Food, Farming, and the Family Meal [3 volumes]

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1192

View: 611

This three-volume work examines all facets of the modern U.S. food system, including the nation's most important food and agriculture laws, the political forces that shape modern food policy, and the food production trends that are directly impacting the lives of every American family. • Examines a breadth of contemporary food controversies and offers diverse viewpoints on them, placing these perspectives fairly into a broader historical context • Presents a multidisciplinary approach to the subject of food that highlights related issues in transportation, business, diet and nutrition, public health, the environment, and public policy • Includes primary documents that illuminate important laws, policies, and perspectives on the environmental, public health, and economic impact of food • Provides readers with the latest information about food controversies as well as extensive resources for further study on major food controversies

Creating Organic Standards in U.S. States

The Diffusion of State Organic Food and Agriculture Legislation, 1976–2010

Author: Samantha L. Mosier

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 358

The National Organic Program regulates the current U.S. organic food and agriculture market, but states started adopting organic regulations in the 1970s. This book examines the diffusion of state organic food and agriculture legislation from 1976–2010 and identifies the consequences for state involvement in this policy domain.

Law and Legalization in Transnational Relations

Author: Christian Brütsch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 836

This volume addresses the emergence of multiple legal and law-like arrangements that alter the interaction between states, their delegated agencies, international organizations and non-state actors in international and transnational politics. Political scientists and legal scholars have been addressing the ‘legalization’ of international regimes and international politics, and engaging in interdisciplinary research on the nature, the causes and the effects of the norm driven controls over different areas and dimensions of global governance. Written by leading contributors in the field, the book claims that the emergence and spread of legal and law-like arrangements contributes to the transformation of world politics, arguing that ‘legalization’ does not only mean that states co-operate in more or less precise, binding and independent regimes, but also that different types of non-state actors can engage in the framing, definition, implementation and enforcement of legal and law-like norms and rules. To capture these diverse observations, the volume provides an interpretative framework that includes the increase in international law-making, the variation of legal and legalized regimes and the differentiation of legal and law-like arrangements. Law and Legalization in Transnational Relations is of interest to students and researchers of international politics, international relations and law.

Food Fears

From Industrial to Sustainable Food Systems

Author: Dr Alison Blay-Palmer

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 196

View: 254

The industrial food system of the West is increasingly perceived as problematic. The physical, social and intellectual distance between consumers and their food stems from a food system that privileges quantity and efficiency over quality, with an underlying assumption that food is a commodity, rather than a source of nourishment and pleasure. In the wake of various food and health scares, there is a growing demand from consumers to change the food they eat, which in turn acts as a catalyst for the industry to adapt and for alternative systems to evolve. Drawing on a wealth of empirical research into mainstream and alternative North American food systems, this book discusses how sustainable, grass roots, local food systems offer a template for meaningful individual activism as a way to bring about change from the bottom up, while at the same time creating pressure for policy changes at all levels of government. This movement signals a shift away from market economy principles and reflects a desire to embody social and ecological values as the foundation for future growth.

Globalization and Food Sovereignty

Global and Local Change in the New Politics of Food

Author: Peter Andree

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 392

View: 637

In recent years, food sovereignty has emerged as a way of contesting corporate control of agricultural markets in pursuit of a more democratic, decentralized food system. The concept unites individuals, communities, civil society organizations, and even states in opposition to globalizing food regimes. This collection examines expressions of food sovereignty ranging from the direct action tactics of La Vía Campesina in Brazil to the consumer activism of the Slow Food movement and the negotiating stances of states from the global South at WTO negotiations. With each case, the contributors explore how claiming food sovereignty allows individuals to challenge the power of global agribusiness and reject neoliberal market economics. With perspectives drawn from Europe, the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Australia, Globalization and Food Sovereignty is the first comparative collection to focus on food sovereignty activism worldwide.

The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 725

The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Alternative Food Networks

Knowledge, Practice, and Politics

Author: David Goodman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 308

View: 444

Farmers’ markets, veggie boxes, local foods, organic products and Fair Trade goods – how have these once novel, "alternative" foods, and the people and networks supporting them, become increasingly familiar features of everyday consumption? Are the visions of "alternative worlds" built on ethics of sustainability, social justice, animal welfare and the aesthetic values of local food cultures and traditional crafts still credible now that these foods crowd supermarket shelves and other "mainstream" shopping outlets? This timely book provides a critical review of the growth of alternative food networks and their struggle to defend their ethical and aesthetic values against the standardizing pressures of the corporate mainstream with its "placeless and nameless" global supply networks. It explores how these alternative movements are "making a difference" and their possible role as fears of global climate change and food insecurity intensify. It assesses the different experiences of these networks in three major arenas of food activism and politics: Britain and Western Europe, the United States, and the global Fair Trade economy. This comparative perspective runs throughout the book to fully explore the progressive erosion of the interface between alternative and mainstream food provisioning. As the era of "cheap food" draws to a close, analysis of the limitations of market-based social change and the future of alternative food economies and localist food politics place this book at the cutting-edge of the field. The book is thoroughly informed by contemporary social theory and interdisciplinary social scientific scholarship, formulates an integrative social practice framework to understand alternative food production-consumption, and offers a unique geographical reach in its case studies.

Environmental Policy in North America

Approaches, Capacity, and the Management of Transboundary Issues

Author: Robert G. Healy

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 780

This comprehensive analysis of key issues in North American environmental policy provides an overview of how the US, Mexico, and Canada differ in their environmental management approaches and capacity levels, and how these differences play into cross-border cooperation on environmental problems. The book offers insights into transboundary cooperation both before and after NAFTA, and presents a framework for making environmental interaction more effective in the future. The book is organized into two parts. The first, more general, section compares the national contexts for environmental management in each country—including economic conditions, sociocultural dynamics, and political decision-making frameworks— and shows how these have led to variations in policy approaches and levels of capacity. The authors argue that effective environmental governance in North America depends on the ability of transboundary institutions to address and mediate these differences. The book's second section illustrates this argument, using four case studies of environmental management in North America: biodiversity and protected areas, air pollution (smog); greenhouse gas reduction, and genetically modified crops.

Dinner at the New Gene Café

How Genetic Engineering Is Changing What We Eat, How We Live, and the Global Politics of Food

Author: Bill Lambrecht

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 215

Biotech companies are racing to alter the genetic building blocks of the world's food. In the United States, the primary venue for this quiet revolution, the acreage of genetically modified crops has soared from zero to 70 million acres since 1996. More than half of America's processed grocery products-from cornflakes to granola bars to diet drinks-contain gene-altered ingredients. But the U.S., unlike Europe and other democratic nations, does not require labeling of modified food. Dinner at the New Gene Café expertly lays out the battle lines of the impending collision between a powerful but unproved technology and a gathering resistance from people worried about the safety of genetic change.