The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis

The Most Credible Theory of Human Evolution

Author: Elaine Morgan

Publisher: Souvenir Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 794

Why do humans differ from other primates? What do those differences tell us about human evolution? Elaine Morgan gives a revolutionary hypothesis that explains our anatomic anomalies--why we walk on two legs, why we are covered in fat, why we can control our rate of breathing? The answers point to one conclusion: millions of years ago our ancestors were trapped in a semi-aquatic environment. In presenting her case Elaine Morgan forces scientists to question accepted theories of human evolution.

AQUATIC APE HYPOTHESIS

Author: Elaine Morgan

Publisher: Souvenir Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 944

Why do humans differ from other primates? What do those differences tell us about human evolution? Elaine Morgan gives a revolutionary hypothesis that explains our anatomic anomalies why we walk on two legs, why we are covered in fat, why we can control our rate of breathing. The answers point to one conclusion: millions of years ago our ancestors were trapped in a semi-aquatic environment. In presenting her case Elaine Morgan forces scientists to question accepted theories of human evolution, while expressing complex ideas for the general reader in a clear and accessible style. A documentary by Sir David Attenborough, The Waterside Ape, is based on Morgan's Aquatic Ape Hypothesis."

The Aquatic Ape

Fact Or Fiction? : the First Scientific Evaluation of a Controversial Theory of Human Evolution

Author: Machteld Roede

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Aquatic ecology

Page: 369

View: 308

The Aquatic Ape

Author: Elaine Morgan

Publisher: Scarborough House

ISBN:

Category: Evolution

Page: 170

View: 462

Argues that the physical differences between humans and apes can be accounted for by assuming that, at one point, our evolutionary ancestors returned to the sea

The Scars of Evolution

Author: Elaine Morgan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 196

View: 873

Popular account of what is known as the 'aquatic ape' thesis.

Was Man More Aquatic in the Past? Fifty Years After Alister Hardy - Waterside Hypotheses of Human Evolution

Author: Mario Vaneechoutte

Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 308

The book starts from the observation that humans are very different from the other primates. Why are we naked? Why do we speak? Why do we walk upright? Fifty years ago, in 1960, marine biologist Sir Alister Hardy tried to answer this when he announced his so-called aquatic hypothesis: human ancestors did not live in dry savannahs as traditional anthropology assumes, but have adapted to live at the edge between land and water, gathering both terrestrial and aquatic foods. This eBook is an up-to-date collection of the views of the most important protagonists of this long-neglected theory of huma.

Pediatric ENT

Author: John M. Graham

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 508

View: 498

This concise textbook covers all the practical and theoretical aspects necessary for those taking exams or wishing to update their knowledge of pediatric ENT medicine. The book is divided into sections covering rhinology, otology and head and neck problems. Uniformly structured chapters, written by internationally recognized experts in their fields, cover all relevant topics comprehensively and succinctly. The book includes more than 300 figures, almost half in color. This useful and reader-friendly textbook will be inspirational to young specialists with an interest in pediatric ENT, useful to those who are due to take their final exams, and informative for established specialists.

The Waterside Ape

An Alternative Account of Human Evolution

Author: Peter H. Rhys Evans

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 226

View: 677

Why are humans so fond of water? Why is our skin colour so variable? Why aren’t we hairy like our close ape relatives? A savannah scenario of human evolution has been widely accepted primarily due to fossil evidence; and fossils do not offer insight into these questions. Other alternative evolutionary scenarios might, but these models have been rejected. This book explores a controversial idea – that human evolution was intimately associated with watery habitats as much or more than typical savannahs. Written from a medical point of view, the author presents evidence supporting a credible alternative explanation for how humans diverged from our primate ancestors. Anatomical and physiological evidence offer insight into hairlessness, different coloured skin, subcutaneous fat, large brains, a marine-type kidney, a unique heat regulation system and speech. This evidence suggests that humans may well have evolved, not just as savannah mammals, as is generally believed, but with more affinity for aquatic habitats – rivers, streams, lakes and coasts. Key Features: Presents the evidence for a close association between riparian habitats and the origin of humans Reviews the "savannah ape" hypothesis for human origins Describes various anatomical adaptations that are associated with hypotheses of human evolution Explores characteristics from the head and neck such as skull and sinus structures, the larynx and ear structures and functions Corroborates a novel scenario for the origin of human kind ‘... a counterpoint to the textbooks or other books which deal with human evolution. I think readers will see it as a clearly written, well-supported discussion of an alternativeperspective on human origins’. —Kathlyn Stewart, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa ‘There is a pressing need to expand discussions of human evolution to includenon-anthropocentric narratives that use comparative data. Dr Rhys-Evans’ specific expertise and experience with the human head, neck, ears, throat, mouth and sinuses, provides him with a distinct perspective from which to approach the subject of human evolution. Moreover, his understanding of non-anthropocentric views of human evolution (water-based models), allow him to apply a biological approach to the subject, missing in more traditional (savannah-based) models’. —Stephen Munro, National Museum of Australia

The Science of Human Evolution

Getting it Right

Author: John H. Langdon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 220

View: 188

This textbook provides a collection of case studies in paleoanthropology demonstrating the method and limitations of science. These cases introduce the reader to various problems and illustrate how they have been addressed historically. The various topics selected represent important corrections in the field, some critical breakthroughs, models of good reasoning and experimental design, and important ideas emerging from normal science.

The Improbable Primate

How Water Shaped Human Evolution

Author: Clive Finlayson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 420

Taking an ecological approach to our evolution, Clive Finlayson considers the origins of modern humans within the context of a drying climate and changing landscapes. Finlayson argues that environmental change, particularly availability of water, played a critical role in shaping the direction of human evolution, contributing to our spread and success. He argues that our ancestors carved a niche for themselves by leaving the forest and forcing their way into a long-established community of carnivores in a tropical savannah as climate changes opened up the landscape. They took their chance at high noon, when most other predators were asleep. Adapting to this new lifestyle by shedding their hair and developing an active sweating system to keep cool, being close to fresh water was vital. As the climate dried, our ancestors, already bipedal, became taller and slimmer, more adept at travelling farther in search of water. The challenges of seeking water in a drying landscape moulded the minds and bodies of early humans, and directed their migrations and eventual settlements. In this fresh and provocative view of a seven-million-year evolutionary journey, Finlayson demonstrates the radical implications for the interpretation of fossils and technologies and shows that understanding humans within an ecological context provides insights into the emergence and spread of Homo sapiens sapiens worldwide.