The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry

Author: Raymond Barfield

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 902

From its beginnings, philosophy's language, concepts and imaginative growth have been heavily influenced by poetry and poets. Drawing on the work of a wide range of thinkers throughout the history of Western philosophy, Raymond Barfield explores the pervasiveness of poetry's impact on philosophy and, conversely, how philosophy has sometimes resisted or denied poetry's influence. Although some thinkers, like Giambatista Vico and Nietzsche, praised the wisdom of poets, and saw poetry and philosophy as mutually beneficial pursuits, others resented, diminished or eliminated the importance of poetry in philosophy. Beginning with the famous passage in Plato's Republic in which Socrates exiles the poets from the city, this book traces the history of the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry through the works of thinkers in the Western tradition ranging from Plato to the work of the contemporary thinker Mikhail Bakhtin.

The Ancient Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry Revisited

Plato and the Greek Literary Tradition

Author: Susan B. Levin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 819

In this study, Levin explores Plato's engagement with the Greek literary tradition in his treatment of key linguistic issues. This investigation, conjoined with a new interpretation of the Republic's familiar critique of poets, supports the view that Plato's work represents a valuable precedent for contemporary reflections on ways in which philosophy might benefit from appeals to literature.

The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry

Studies in Ancient Thought

Author: Evan Pugh Professor of Philosophy Stanley Rosen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 794

Now available in paperback, The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry focuses on the theoretical and practical suppositions of the long-standing conflict between philosophy and poetry. Stanley Rosen--one of the leading Plato scholars of our day--examines philosophical activity, questioning whether technical philosophy is a species of poetry, a political program, an interpretation of human existence according to the ideas of 19th and 20th-century thinkers, or a contemplation of beings and Being.

The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry

Studies in Ancient Thought

Author: Stanley Rosen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 238

View: 267

Now available in paperback, The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry focuses on the theoretical and practical suppositions of the long-standing conflict between philosophy and poetry. Stanley Rosen--one of the leading Plato scholars of our day--examines philosophical activity, questioning whether technical philosophy is a species of poetry, a political program, an interpretation of human existence according to the ideas of 19th and 20th-century thinkers, or a contemplation of beings and Being.

The Ancient Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy

Author: Thomas Gould

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 348

View: 588

Affecting audiences with depictions of suffering and injustice is a key function of tragedy, and yet it has long been viewed by philosophers as a dubious enterprise. In this book Thomas Gould uses both historical and theoretical approaches to explore tragedy and its power to gratify readers and audiences. He takes as his starting point Plato's moral and psychological objections to tragedy, and the conflict he recognized between "poetry"--the exploitation of our yearning to see ourselves as victims--and "philosophy"--the insistence that all good people are happy. Plato's objections to tragedy are shown to be an essential feature of Socratic rationalism and to constitute a formidable challenge even today. Gould makes a case for the rightness and psychological necessity of violence and suffering in literature, art, and religion, but he distinguishes between depictions of violence that elicit sympathy only for the victims and those that cause us to sympathize entirely with the perpetrators. It is chiefly the former, Gould argues, that fuel our responses not only to true tragedy but also to religious myths and critical displays of political rage. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy

Perspectives Across the Humanities

Author: John Burns

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy, Ancient

Page: 120

View: 235

The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy: Perspectives Across the Humanities is an interdisciplinary study of the abiding quarrel to which poet-philosopher Plato referred centuries ago in the Republic. The book presents eight chapters by four humanities scholars that historically contextualize and cross-interpret aspects of the quarrel in question. The authors share the view that although poets and philosophers continually quarrel, a harmonious union between the two groups is achievable in a manner promising application to a variety of contemporary cultural-political and aesthetic debates, all of which have implications for the current status of the humanities.

The Ancient Quarrel Unsettled: Plato and the Erotics of Tragic Poetry

Author: Thomas Luke Bartscherer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 222

View: 339

This study examines Plato's critique of tragedy and his account of the relationship between philosophy and poetry. I argue that for Plato, tragic drama is poetry par excellence, a limit case in which the analysis of the nature of poetry can be exhibited most clearly. Central to Plato's critique of tragedy is what Socrates in Book X of the Republic refers to as the "quarrel between philosophy and poetry." Since antiquity this quarrel has commanded the attention of Plato's interpreters, and in recent decades it has become a recurrent motif in Platonic studies and in the expanding field of philosophical engagement with literature. In contrast to much that has been written on this subject, I argue that the opposition is not, at root, a generic distinction based on formal criteria such as meter or diction, nor is it simply the difference between myth-making and account-giving, between muthos and logos. Most significantly, against the predominant view among scholars, I maintain that the arguments developed by Socrates and his interlocutors against poetry are not intended by Plato to constitute philosophy's victory over poetry. Nor, for that matter, do these arguments manifest philosophy's failure to defeat its opponent. On my reading, the quarrel is deliberately unresolved. In the mode of a thought experiment, it contrasts two opposing conceptions of the nature and purpose of human discursive activity and the ethical implications of each, and it turns ultimately on the question of what Plato calls eros. Philosophy and poetry manifest different understandings of the character and fate of erotic striving and constitute two different responses to the human condition.

Literature Against Philosophy, Plato to Derrida

A Defence of Poetry

Author: Mark Edmundson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 243

View: 995

This timely book argues that the institutionalisation of literary theory, particularly within American and British academic circles, has led to a sterility of thought which ignores the special character of literary art. Mark Edmundson traces the origins of this tendency to the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry, in which Plato took the side of philosophy; and he shows how the work of modern theorists - Foucault, Derrida, de Man and Bloom - exhibits similar drives to subsume poetic art into some 'higher' kind of thought. Challenging and controversial, this book should be read by all teachers of literature and of theory, and by anyone concerned about the future of institutionalised literary studies.

The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy

Perspectives Across the Humanities

Author: John Burns

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 112

View: 172

The Quarrel Between Poetry and Philosophy: Perspectives Across the Humanities is an interdisciplinary study of the abiding quarrel to which poet-philosopher Plato referred centuries ago in the Republic. The book presents eight chapters by four humanities scholars that historically contextualize and cross-interpret aspects of the quarrel in question. The authors share the view that although poets and philosophers continually quarrel, a harmonious union between the two groups is achievable in a manner promising application to a variety of contemporary cultural-political and aesthetic debates, all of which have implications for the current status of the humanities.

Plato and the Poets

Author: Pierre Destrée

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 456

View: 398

The nineteen essays presented here aim to illuminate the ways poetry and the poets are discussed by Plato throughout his writing career. As well as throwing new light on old topics, such as mimesis and poetic inspiration, the volume introduces fresh approaches to Plato’s philosophy of poetry and literature.

Plato's Rivalry with Medicine

A Struggle and Its Dissolution

Author: Susan B. Levin

Publisher: Oxford University Press (UK)

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 299

View: 413

Susan B. Levin argues that Plato's engagement with medicine is richer than previously recognised and that he views it as an important rival for authority on nature and flourishing. She further shows that Plato's work, particularly the 'Laws', holds significant promise for bioethics that has so far been nearly untapped.

Exiling the Poets

The Production of Censorship in Plato's Republic

Author: Ramona A. Naddaff

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 189

View: 252

The question of why Plato censored poetry in his Republic has bedeviled scholars for centuries. In Exiling the Poets, Ramona A. Naddaff offers a strikingly original interpretation of this ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy. Underscoring not only the repressive but also the productive dimension of literary censorship, Naddaff brings to light Plato's fundamental ambivalence about the value of poetic discourse in philosophical investigation. Censorship, Nadaff argues, is not merely a mechanism of silencing but also provokes new ways of speaking about controversial and crucial cultural and artistic events. It functions philosophically in the Republic to subvert Plato's most crucial arguments about politics, epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Naddaff develops this stunning argument through an extraordinary reading of Plato's work. In books 2 and 3, the first censorship of poetry, she finds that Plato constitutes the poet as a rival with whom the philosopher must vie agonistically. In other words, philosophy does not replace poetry, as most commentators have suggested; rather, the philosopher becomes a worthy and ultimately victorious poetic competitor. In book 10's second censorship, Plato exiles the poets as a mode of self-subversion, rethinking and revising his theory of mimesis, of the immortality of the soul, and, most important, the first censorship of poetry. Finally, in a subtle and sophisticated analysis of the myth of Er, Naddaff explains how Plato himself censors his own censorships of poetry, thus producing the unexpected result of a poetically animated and open-ended dialectical philosophy.

Philosophy and Poetry

Continental Perspectives

Author: Ranjan Ghosh

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 666

Ever since Plato’s Socrates exiled the poets from the ideal city in The Republic, Western thought has insisted on a strict demarcation between philosophy and poetry. Yet might their long-standing quarrel hide deeper affinities? This book explores the distinctive ways in which twentieth-century and contemporary continental thinkers have engaged with poetry and its contribution to philosophical meaning making, challenging us to rethink how philosophy has been changed through its encounters with poetry. In wide-ranging reflections on thinkers such as Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Lacan, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze, Irigaray, Badiou, Kristeva, and Agamben, among others, distinguished contributors consider how different philosophers encountered the force and intensity of poetry and the negotiations that took place as they sought resolutions of the quarrel. Instead of a clash between competing worldviews, they figured the relationship between philosophy and poetry as one of productive mutuality, leading toward new modes of thinking and understanding. Spanning a range of issues with nuance and rigor, this compelling and comprehensive book opens new possibilities for philosophical poetry and the poetics of philosophy.

Beyond the Ancient Quarrel

Literature, Philosophy, and J.M. Coetzee

Author: Patrick Hayes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 671

In Plato's Republic, Socrates spoke of an 'ancient quarrel between literature and philosophy' which he offered to resolve once and for all by banning the poets from his ideal city. Few philosophers have taken Socrates at his word, and out of the ancient quarrel there has emerged a long tradition that has sought to value literature chiefly as a useful supplement to philosophical reasoning. The fiction of J.M. Coetzee makes a striking challenge to this tradition. While his writing has frequently engaged philosophical subjects in explicit ways, it has done so with an emphasis on the dissonance between literary expression and philosophical reasoning. And while Coetzee has often overtly engaged with academic literary theory, his fiction has done so in a way that has tended to disorient rather than affirm those same theories, wrong-footing the normal processes of literary interpretation. This volume brings together philosophers and literary theorists to reflect upon the challenge Coetzee has made to their respective disciplines, and to the disciplinary distinctions at stake in the ancient quarrel. The essays use his fiction to explore questions about the boundaries between literature, philosophy, and literary criticism; the relationship between literature, theology, and post-secularism; the particular ways in which literature engages reality; how literature interacts with the philosophies of language, action, subjectivity, and ethics; and the institutions that govern the distinctions between literature and philosophy. It will be of importance not only to readers of Coetzee, but to anyone interested in the ancient quarrel itself.