Terror in the Name of God

Why Religious Militants Kill

Author: Jessica Stern

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 185

For four years, Jessica Stern interviewed extremist members of three religions around the world: Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Traveling extensively—to refugee camps in Lebanon, to religious schools in Pakistan, to prisons in Amman, Asqelon, and Pensacola—she discovered that the Islamic jihadi in the mountains of Pakistan and the Christian fundamentalist bomber in Oklahoma have much in common. Based on her vast research, Stern lucidly explains how terrorist organizations are formed by opportunistic leaders who—using religion as both motivation and justification—recruit the disenfranchised. She depicts how moral fervor is transformed into sophisticated organizations that strive for money, power, and attention. Jessica Stern's extensive interaction with the faces behind the terror provide unprecedented insight into acts of inexplicable horror, and enable her to suggest how terrorism can most effectively be countered. A crucial book on terrorism, Terror in the Name of God is a brilliant and thought-provoking work.

After the Rio

The Meaning of Multicultural Australia

Author: Benjamin Herscovitch

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Multiculturalism

Page: 11

View: 829

Terror in the Mind of God, Fourth Edition

The Global Rise of Religious Violence

Author: Mark Juergensmeyer

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 408

View: 618

"Completely revised and updated, this new edition of Terror in the Mind of God incorporates the events of September 11, 2001 into Mark Juergensmeyer's landmark study of religious terrorism. Juergensmeyer explores the 1993 World Trade Center explosion, Hamas suicide bombings, the Tokyo subway nerve gas attack, and the killing of abortion clinic doctors in the United States. His personal interviews with 1993 World Trade Center bomber Mahmud Abouhalima, Christian Right activist Mike Bray, Hamas leaders Sheik Yassin and Abdul Azis Rantisi, and Sikh political leader Simranjit Singh Mann, among others, take us into the mindset of those who perpetrate and support violence in the name of religion."--Provided by publisher.

In the Name of God and Country

Reconsidering Terrorism in American History

Author: Michael Fellman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 600

With insight and originality, Michael Fellman argues that terrorism, in various forms, has been a constant and driving force in American history. In part, this is due to the nature of American republicanism and Protestant Christianity, which he believes contain a core of moral absolutism and self-righteousness that perpetrators of terrorism use to justify their actions. Fellman also argues that there is an intrinsic relationship between terrorist acts by non-state groups and responses on the part of the state; unlike many observers, he believes that both the action and the reaction constitute terrorism.Fellman’s compelling narrative focuses on five key episodes: John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry; terrorism during the American Civil War, especially race warfare and guerrilla warfare; the organized “White Line” paramilitary destruction of Reconstruction in Mississippi; the Haymarket Affair and its aftermath; and the Philippine-American war of 1899–1902. In an epilogue, he applies this history to illuminate the Bush-Cheney administration’s use of terrorism in the so-called war on terror. In the Name of God and Country demonstrates the centrality of terrorism in shaping America even to this day.

Rule by Terror

The Atrocities Committed in the Name of God

Author: Nasser Hamid

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Terrorism

Page:

View: 926

Comparative Philosophy and Religion in Times of Terror

Author: Douglas Allen

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 257

View: 379

Ever since the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, concerns about violence, terror, and terrorism have dominated our contemporary lifestyle. Is religion a part of the problem or the solution? Can philosophical reflection help us to understand terror, violence, and insecurity? Can comparative philosophy and religion help us to overcome ethnocentrism, dangerous stereotypes, and think about new approaches to violence and terror? The authors of these timely studies provide brilliant insight into violence and terror as formulated by Plato, Aristotle, the Buddha, Confucius, Af-Farabi, Nietzsche, Dewey, Ueshiba, Gandhi, and Abdul Ghaffar Khan. Their diverse voices consider the threat of violence from various standpoints, taking religious and philosophical discourse as the starting point of the approach. This is a hopeful volume that offers new creative insights for the future. These studies allow us to analyze the real problems of violence, terror, and insecurity in much broader and deeper ways, and they present new approaches that offer possibilities for greater nonviolence, security, and peace.