Teach Writing Well

How to Assess Writing, Invigorate Instruction, and Rethink Revision

Author: Ruth Culham

Publisher: Stenhouse Publishers

ISBN:

Category: EDUCATION

Page: 224

View: 242

Ask successful writers and they'll tell you, the key to writing well is revision. Ask elementary school teachers and they'll tell you, the real challenge of writing instruction is teaching kids how to revise. Ruth Culham is both a successful writer and a writing teacher, and she's discovered how to teach writing and revision in a way that's accessible to both teacher and students: First read the writing, assess it using the traits of writing, then teach the writers and guide revision decisions using traits as a common language and map. This book shows you how to assess and teach writing in a way that's practical and doable--and best of all, see results. Part 1 walks you through the traits of writing and their key qualities, showing step by step how to read students' writing and offer feedback that nudges them forward through the revision process. Chapters will help you address challenges students face within each mode of writing (narrative, expository, persuasive), and provide tools young writers can use to evaluate their own writing and make revision decisions accordingly. Part 2 dives into instruction, offering specific guidance for how to use what you've learned from reading student writing to design lessons that scaffold students toward making their own craft decisions and revisions. In addition, there's an entire chapter devoted to mentor texts that you can use to model traits and key qualities for your students.

Teaching Writing to Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learners

Author: Donovan R. Walling

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 136

View: 522

This resource offers differentiated teaching techniques and sample lessons for writing and thinking skills that emphasize fluency, artistry, walkabout strategies, pattern and rhythm, and more!

Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination

Essays Exploring What “Teaching Writing” Means

Author: P. L. Thomas

Publisher: IAP

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 359

View: 739

American author Kurt Vonnegut has famously declared that writing is unteachable, yet formal education persists in that task. Teaching Writing as Journey, Not Destination is the culmination of P.L. Thomas’s experiences as both a writer and a teacher of writing reaching into the fourth decade of struggling with both. This volume collects essays that examine the enduring and contemporary questions facing writing teachers, including grammar instruction, authentic practices in high-stakes environments, student choice, citation and plagiarism, the five-paragraph essay, grading, and the intersections of being a writer and teaching writing. Thomas offers concrete classroom experiences drawn from teaching high school ELA, first-year composition, and a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses. Ultimately, however, the essays are a reflection of Thomas’s journey and a concession to both writing and teaching writing as journeys without ultimate destinations.

Teaching Writing

Key Stage 1 and Before

Author: Ann Browne

Publisher: Nelson Thornes

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 222

View: 517

The requirements of the National Literacy Strategy are fully addressed in this book on teaching writing at Key Stage 1 and before. It features coverage of the structure and use of the English language and gives an explanation of classroom planning and management, based on an understanding of how children learn and progress. Included is also practical guidance on effective teaching practice, embedded in a modern theoretical framework.

Teaching Children to Write

Constructing Meaning and Mastering Mechanics

Author: Daniel R. Meier

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 158

View: 135

In his latest book, Daniel Meier highlights the critical importance of integrating content and mechanics for successful and engaged writing at the K–4 level. Featuring the teaching philosophies and strategies of seven exemplary teachers, and a discussion of relevant research and theory, Meier provides a fresh, practical, and much-needed perspective on making writing meaningful and effective in the current standards-based era. Written by an experienced teacher and researcher, this book will be of interest to both new and veteran teachers, As well as curriculum coordinators, literacy coaches, and researchers on writing.

Writing Sense

Integrated Reading and Writing Lessons for English Language Learners, K-8

Author: Juli Kendall

Publisher: Stenhouse Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 214

View: 250

Writing is all about making meaning. The prospect of teaching writing to a classroom full of students—some who speak English and some who don't, can be overwhelming. When students learning English are at different levels, the task is even more challenging. Juli Kendall and Outey Khuon experimented with Ellin Keene's “Thinking Strategies Used by Proficient Learners” and found that by integrating writing and reading instruction their English language learners become stronger writers. Writing Sense outlines the classroom conditions necessary for successful writing instruction with English language learners, whether in writing workshop and/or small-group instruction. It includes 68 classroom-tested lessons for grades K–8 that show kids at all levels of language acquisition how to make connections, ask questions, visualize (make mental images), infer, determine importance, synthesize, monitor meaning and comprehension, and use fix-up strategies. Like the authors' earlier book, Making Sense, the five main sections are geared to the stages of language proficiency, and lessons are divided into “younger” and “older” students, spanning kindergarten through to grade eight. There are extensive lists of suggested books for mentor texts as well as lists of mentor authors to facilitate teachers' planning and instruction.

The Core: Teaching Your Child the Foundations of Classical Education

Author: Leigh A. Bortins

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 768

In the past, correct spelling, the multiplication tables, the names of the state capitals and the American presidents were basics that all children were taught in school. Today, many children graduate without this essential knowledge. Most curricula today follow a haphazard sampling of topics with a focus on political correctness instead of teaching students how to study. Leigh Bortins, a leading figure in the homeschooling community, is having none of it. She believes that there are core areas of knowledge that are essential to master. Without knowing the multiplication tables, children can't advance to algebra. Without mastery of grammar, students will have difficulty expressing themselves. Without these essential building blocks of knowledge, students may remember information but they will never possess a broad and deep understanding of how the world works. In The Core, Bortins gives parents the tools and methodology to implement a rigorous, thorough, and broad curriculum based on the classical model, including: - Rote memorization to cement knowledge - Systematic learning of geography, historical facts, and timelines - Reading the great books and seminal historical documents instead of adaptations and abridged editions - Rigorous training in math and the natural sciences

Teaching Writing

A Workshop Approach

Author: Adele Fiderer

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 112

View: 370

Grade level: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, p, e, i, t.

Teaching writing

theories and practices

Author: Maxine C. Hairston

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 919