TARDISbound

Navigating the Universes of Doctor Who

Author: Piers D. Britton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 285

'Doctor Who' has always thrived on multiplicty, unpredictability and transformation, it's worlds and characters kaleidoscopic and shifting, and 'Doctor Who"s complexity has grown. With its triumphant return to TV in 2005, it was made up of four different fictional forms, across three different media, with five actors simultaneously playing the eponymous hero. 'TARDISbound' is the first book to deal both with the TV series and with the 'audio adventures', original novels, and short story anthologies produced since the 1990s, engaging with the common elements of these different texts and with distinctive features of each. 'TARDISbound' places 'Doctor Who' under a variety of lenses, from examining the leading characteristics of these 'Doctor Who' texts, to issues of class, ethnicity and gender in relation to the Doctor(s), other TARDIS crew-members, and the non-human/inhuman beings they encounter. 'TARDISbound' also addresses major questions about the aesthetics and ethical implications of 'Doctor Who'.

Once Upon a Time Lord

The Myths and Stories of Doctor Who

Author: Ivan Phillips

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 312

View: 384

'Every story ever told really happened...' (The Doctor, 'Hell Bent', 2015) Stories are, fundamentally what Doctor Who is all about. In Once Upon a Time Lord, Ivan Phillips explores a wide range of perspectives on these stories and presents a lively and richly-varied analysis of the accumulated tales that constitute this popular modern mythology. Concerned equally with 'classic' and 'new' Who, Phillips looks at how aspects of the Time Lord's story have been developed on television and beyond, tracing lines of connection and divergence across various media. He discusses Doctor Who as a mythology that has drawn on its own past in often complex ways, at the same time reworking elements from many other sources, whether literary, cinematic, televisual or historical. Once Upon A Time Lord offers an original take on this singular hero's journey, reading the unsettled enigma of the Doctor in relation to the characters, narratives and locations that he has encountered across more than half a century.

The Language of Doctor Who

From Shakespeare to Alien Tongues

Author: Jason Barr

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 298

View: 340

In a richly developed fictional universe, Doctor Who, a wandering survivor of a once-powerful alien civilization, possesses powers beyond human comprehension. He can bend the fabric of time and space with his TARDIS, alter the destiny of worlds, and drive entire species into extinction. The good doctor’s eleven “regenerations” and fifty years’ worth of adventures make him the longest-lived hero in science-fiction television. In The Language of Doctor Who: From Shakespeare to Alien Tongues, Jason Barr and Camille D. G. Mustachio present several essays that use language as an entry point into the character and his universe. Ranging from the original to the rebooted television series—through the adventures of the first eleven Doctors—these essays explore how written and spoken language have been used to define the Doctor’s ever-changing identities, shape his relationships with his many companions, and give him power over his enemies—even the implacable Daleks. Individual essays focus on fairy tales, myths, medical-travel narratives, nursery rhymes, and, of course, Shakespeare. Contributors consider how the Doctor’s companions speak with him through graffiti, how the Doctor himself uses postmodern linguistics to communicate with alien species, and how language both unites and divides fans of classic Who and new Who as they try to converse with each other. Broad in scope, innovative in approach, and informed by a deep affection for the program, TheLanguage of Doctor Who will appeal to scholars of science fiction, television, and language, as well as to fans looking for a new perspective on their favorite Time Lord.

Watching Doctor Who

Fan Reception and Evaluation

Author: Paul Booth

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 216

View: 577

Watching Doctor Who explores fandom's changing attitudes towards Doctor Who. Why do fans love an episode one year but deride it a decade later? How do fans' values of Doctor Who change over time? As a show with an over fifty-year history, Doctor Who helps us understand the changing nature of notions of 'value' and 'quality' in popular television. The authors interrogate the way Doctor Who fans and audiences re-interpret the value of particular episodes, Doctors, companions, and eras of Who. With a foreword by Paul Cornell.

New Dimensions of Doctor Who

Adventures in Space, Time and Television

Author: Matt Hills

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Doctor Who (Television program : 2005- )

Page: 240

View: 846

The Doctor may have regenerated on many occasions, but so too has Doctor Who. Moving with the times, the show has evolved across fifty years. New Dimensions of Doctor Who brings together experts on the Doctors, on TV brands, bioethics, transmedia, and cultural icons to explore contemporary developments in the series' music, design and representations of technology, plus issues of showrunner authority and star authorship. Putting these new dimensions into context means thinking about changes in the TV industry such as the rise of branding and transmedia storytelling. Along with its faster na.

Religion and Doctor Who

Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith

Author: Andrew Crome

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 366

View: 635

Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.

New Dimensions of Doctor Who

Adventures in Space, Time and Television

Author: David Mellor

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 375

The Doctor may have regenerated on many occasions, but so too has Doctor Who. Moving with the times, the show has evolved across fifty years. New Dimensions of Doctor Who brings together experts on the Doctors, on TV brands, bioethics, transmedia, and cultural icons to explore contemporary developments in the series' music, design and representations of technology, plus issues of showrunner authority and star authorship. Putting these new dimensions into context means thinking about changes in the TV industry such as the rise of branding and transmedia storytelling. Along with its faster narrative pace, and producer/fan interaction via Twitter, 'new Who' also has a new home: Roath Lock Studios at Cardiff Bay. Studying the Doctor Who Experience in its Cardiff setting, and considering audience nostalgia alongside anniversary celebrations, this book explores how current Doctor Who relates to real-world spaces and times.