Surfiction

Fiction Now and Tomorrow

Author: Raymond Federman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 294

View: 169

REAL. Vol. 5

Author: Herbert Grabes

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 329

View: 444

Christine Brooke-Rose and Contemporary Fiction

Author: Sarah Birch

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 253

View: 604

Setting her work firmly in the context of English and French writing as well as literary and feminist theory, Sarah Birch examines the full range of Brooke-Rose's fiction: the early realist novels published between 1957-1961; the strongly anti-realist period beginning with Out (1964), when Brooke-Rose's work was seen to be heavily influenced by French experimental fiction; and the third phase of her development which began with Xorandor (1986) and which marks a questioning return to the traditional techniques of the novel.

Raymond Federman and Samuel Beckett

Voices in the Closet

Author: Nathalie Camerlynck

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 178

View: 984

This book is about Raymond Federman and his incredible textual obsession with Samuel Beckett. Federman was a scholar of Beckett, postmodern theorist, a self-translator and avant-garde novelist. Born in Paris in 1928, all of his immediate family perished in the Holocaust. Federman escaped thanks to his mother, who hid him in a closet. After the war, he migrated to America and devoted his life to scholarship and creative writing. In both, he devoted his life to Beckett. Federman’s creative and theoretical writings contaminate and pervert each other just as, in his novels, French contaminates English and fiction perverts reality. His work is centered on the details of his survival, enacting a perpetual return to the closet, as previous studies have demonstrated. By examining Beckettian (and by extension Joycean) intertextuality in the novels of Raymond Federman, this study traces the contours of a second closet.

Critifiction

Postmodern Essays

Author: Raymond Federman

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 133

View: 457

This book examines how, beginning in the 1960s up to the present, a new type of fiction was created in America, but also in Europe and Latin America, in response to the cultural, social, and political turmoil of the time. The author has coined the term “Surfiction” for this New Fiction. Written in an informal, provocative style, by an internationally known practitioner, these essays examine the cultural, social, and political conditions that forced serious writers to reflect (often within the work itself) on the act of writing fiction in the modern world. The entire book can be read as a manifesto for the present and future of the new fiction. This book is the first in the SUNY series in Postmodern Culture, edited by Joseph Natoli.

Herta Müller

Politics and Aesthetics

Author: Bettina Brandt

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 430

Two languages--German and Romanian--inform the novels, essays, and collage poetry of Nobel laureate Herta Müller. Describing her writing as "autofictional," Müller depicts the effects of violence, cruelty, and terror on her characters based on her own experiences in Communist Romania under the repressive Nicolae Ceau?escu regime. Herta Müller: Politics and Aesthetics explores Müller's writings from different literary, cultural, and historical perspectives. Part 1 features Müller's Nobel lecture, five new collage poems, and an interview with Ernest Wichner, a German-Romanian author who has traveled with her and sheds light on her writing. Parts 2 and 3, featuring essays by scholars from across Europe and the United States, address the political and poetical aspects of Müller's texts. Contributors discuss life under the Romanian Communist dictatorship while also stressing key elements of Müller's poetics, which promises both self-conscious formal experimentation and political intervention. One of the first books in English to thoroughly examine Müller's writing, this volume addresses audiences with an interest in dissident, exile, migration, experimental, and transnational literature.

Narrative Innovation and Cultural Rewriting in the Cold War Era and After

Author: M. Cornis-Pope

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 318

View: 349

Narrative Innovation and Cultural Rewriting undertakes a systematic study of postmodernism's responses to the polarized ideologies of the postwar period that have held cultures hostage to a confrontation between rival ideologies abroad and a clash between champions of uniformity and disruptive others at home. Considering a broad range of narrative projects and approaches (from polysystemic fiction to surfiction, postmodern feminism, and multicultural/postcolonial fiction), this book highlights their solutions to ontological division (real vs. imaginary, wordly and other-worldly), sociocultural oppositions (of race, class, gender) and narratological dualities (imitation vs. invention, realism vs. formalism). A thorough rereading of the best experimental work published in the US since the mid-1960s reveals the fact that innovative fiction has been from the beginning concerned with redefining the relationship between history and fiction, narrative and cultural articulation. Stepping back from traditional polarizations, innovative novelists have tried to envision an alternative history of irreducible particularities, excluded middles, and creative intercrossings.

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory

Author: David HERMAN

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 720

View: 739

The past several decades have seen an explosion of interest in narrative, with this multifaceted object of inquiry becoming a central concern in a wide range of disciplinary fields and research contexts. As accounts of what happened to particular people in particular circumstances and with specific consequences, stories have come to be viewed as a basic human strategy for coming to terms with time, process, and change. However, the very predominance of narrative as a focus of interest across multiple disciplines makes it imperative for scholars, teachers, and students to have access to a comprehensive reference resource.

Barry Hannah

Postmodern Romantic

Author: Ruth D. Weston

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 164

View: 142

A thematic tour of the complete works from this exceptional Southern writer.

Historical Dictionary of Postmodernist Literature and Theater

Author: Fran Mason

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 586

View: 315

This second edition of Historical Dictionary of Postmodernist Literature and Theater contains a chronology, an introduction, and a bibliography. The dictionary section has over 400 cross-referenced entries on postmodernist writers, the important postmodernist aesthetic practices.

Mimesis in Contemporary Theory: An interdisciplinary approach

Volume 2: Mimesis, semiosis and power

Author: Ronald Bogue

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 370

The essays collected in this volume focus on the interrelated themes of mimesis, semiosis and power, each study exploring some facet of the problem of representation and its relation to strategies of power in the use of verbal and visual signs. Topics discussed include mimesis and power in Plato's Ion, rhetoric and erotics in Petrarch's thought; the limits of visual and verbal representation in Renaissance paintings of the Annunciation; binary thought and Peirce's triadic semiotics; the cinematic semiotics of Gilles Deleuze; fascist iconography in the paintings of Anselm Kiefer; oppositional strategies in postmodern fiction; visual and verbal representations of the body in mass culture; and the semiotics of violence in postmodern popular culture.

The Novel Today

Contemporary Writers on Modern Fiction

Author: Malcolm Bradbury

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: American fiction

Page: 256

View: 279

Britain's most important contemporary authors reflect intelligently and imaginatively on the nature and development of the modern novel.

A Rhetoric of the Unreal

Studies in Narrative and Structure, Especially of the Fantastic

Author: Christine Brooke-Rose

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 446

View: 401

Cutting across the wide field of 'fantastic' literature, Professor Brooke-Rose examines the essential differences between several 'fantastic' narratives against the background of realistic fiction.

Critifiction

Postmodern Essays

Author: Raymond Federman

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 133

View: 216

This book examines how, beginning in the 1960s up to the present, a new type of fiction was created in America, but also in Europe and Latin America, in response to the cultural, social, and political turmoil of the time. The author has coined the term "Surfiction" for this New Fiction. Written in an informal, provocative style, by an internationally known practitioner, these essays examine the cultural, social, and political conditions that forced serious writers to reflect (often within the work itself) on the act of writing fiction in the modern world. The entire book can be read as a manifesto for the present and future of the new fiction. This book is the first in the SUNY series in Postmodern Culture, edited by Joseph Natoli.

Subversively Personal

Surfiction as Communication in Vietnam War-era America

Author: Patrick James Keller

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 220

View: 642

In my dissertation, I argue that the formal innovations of Ron Sukenick, Raymond Federman, Steve Katz, Clarence Major, and Gilbert Sorrentino during the 1960s and 1970s should be read as an attempt to communicate individual experience without covert modeling of the world or overt prescription about how readers should live in it. Concerned that news outlets, government institutions, and mainstream publishing companies were increasingly trying to dictate--rather than reflect--the experience of individual Americans during a period of cultural schism, these authors wrote novels that spark like Kerouac, boast like Miller, collage like Dos Passos, wander like Sterne, and go on like Beckett in order to eschew the guise of objective reportage in favor of openly subjective improvisations. Due to readerly preconceptions about the function of the novel form, these "surfictions" have been misread as valorizing a self-indulgent view of art as completely autonomous from the world, but my project articulates the Surfictionists' philosophy of composition, drawn from their correspondence, drafts, and lesser-read interviews and essays and proposes definitive criteria for the "surfiction" as a distinct mode of writing that lies outsides the conventional categories of fiction and non-fiction. In the process, I identify assumptions that underlie the critical vocabularies of narratology, poetics, theory of autobiography, and theory of self-conscious fiction, suggesting ways that these discourses must be expanded to accommodate this mode of writing. To contextualize Surfiction in its cultural moment, I explore its affinities to the radical aesthetic protest of its time (including the Situationist International, the Yippies, and the liberatory approach to fiction described by Roland Barthes), situate its theory of composition against more well-known models (including those of Frank O'Hara, William Wordsworth, and T.S. Eliot), and contrast its practice against other contemporaneous forms of hybrid writing (including the metafiction of Kurt Vonnegut and the New Journalism of James Kunen).

The Play of the Double in Postmodern American Fiction

Author: Gordon Slethaug

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 388

In The Hawkline Monster, Brautigan's minimalist metafictive parody of the double depicts our narcissistic view of reality. In Double or Nothing, Federman subverts the conventional double, exposing its gamelike structures and traditional views of life and text.

The Paradox of Freedom

A Study of the Life and Writings of Nicholas Mosley

Author: Shiva Rahbaran

Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 586

As the first book-length study of Nicholas Mosley, "The Paradox of Freedom" combines a discussion of the author's incredible biography with an investigation of his writing, nearly all of which is published by Dalkey Archive Press. The son of Oswald Mosley (the leader of Britain's fascistic Blackshirts), a British Lord, a Christian convert, a war veteran, a voracious reader, and an important thinker, Nicholas Mosley has, this book argues, employed all of these experiences and ideas in novels and memoirs that seek to describe the paradoxical nature of freedom: how can man be free when limiting structures are necessary? Can it be achieved, and how? The answer lies in the books themselves, in the ways telling and re-telling stories allows one to escape the seemingly logical bounderies of life and discover new meanings and possibilities. This is a much-needed companion to the work of one of Britain's most important post-War writers.