Study Abroad and Interculturality

Perspectives and Discourses

Author: Claudia Borghetti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 222

View: 403

Study abroad (SA) as a domain of inquiry in the field of Applied Linguistics has been approached from a variety of different perspectives. Although originally focused on measuring the impact of residence abroad on students' language development, in the last decade the so-called 'social' turn in Second Language Acquisition has brought to the fore the importance of socio-cultural aspects of the students' experiences (such as the amount of contact they have with the local community, their social networks, etc.). This focus on the students' entire lived experiences in the destination country opened the door to an increased interest in analysing their language encounters in terms of intercultural learning. This new domain of investigation in SA research, focused on the students' opportunities for intercultural development while abroad, is varied in terms of perspectives and discourses, as it catalyses the different interests and viewpoints of the various stakeholders, including educational institutions, international political organisations, teachers or the students themselves. This book gathers some of these voices, with contributions on topics such as the features, dynamics, advantages and shortcomings, preparation needs and pedagogical issues relating to student mobility in terms of the participants' intercultural learning. This book was originally published as a special issue of Language and Intercultural Communication.

Intercultural Interventions in Study Abroad

Author: Jane Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 215

View: 683

As a consequence of globalization and internationalization, there has been a dramatic increase in the number and diversity of students who are gaining international educational experience. Making connections between contemporary study abroad research, theory, and practice, Intercultural Interventions in Study Abroad describes innovative programmes that have been designed to deepen the intercultural learning and engagement of student sojourners. In addition to reviewing the benefits and limitations of these interventions, this volume offers recommendations for further enhancements in the field. Exploring examples of intercultural interventions in a wide variety of countries from pre- to post-study abroad, this book helps readers develop a critical awareness of their strengths and limitations, and provides directions for future developments in intercultural pedagogy. Written by intercultural educators and study abroad scholars from different parts of the world, each chapter describes an innovative pedagogical intervention that has been designed to enhance intercultural learning and engagement, including: designing and implementing pre-sojourn intercultural workshops; using guided, critical reflection to deepen students' intercultural learning and engagement; monitoring class interaction to maximize intercultural learning; optimizing intercultural learning and engagement abroad through online mentoring. Truly international in scope, this text is essential for study abroad professionals who seek to enhance the intercultural development, global-mindedness, and second-language learning of students through innovative intercultural programming.

Online Intercultural Education and Study Abroad

Theory into Practice

Author: Jane Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 213

With the increasing focus on international education and study abroad programmes, Online Intercultural Education and Study Abroad meets the need for a text that addresses ways in which technology may be harnessed to enhance student experience. Combining case studies with theoretical insights, this book critically investigates the effectiveness of a fully online study abroad intervention that was designed to optimise intercultural learning in an international context. Intercultural education researchers and practitioners are provided with theory-based practical ideas such as eLearning strategies and online mentoring tips to help students maximise their intercultural education journey, intercultural competence development, and social engagement while abroad. Both practical and research-focused, this volume considers a wide range of topics, including: Contemporary notions of experiential learning Guided critical reflection through e-mentoring A social contructivist orientation towards eLearning pedgagogy Tools to help understand and measure learner development abroad Online Intercultural Education and Study Abroad is suitable for both novice and experienced study abroad practitioners, researchers, and administrators. Satisfying the growing interest in using eLearning within study abroad programmes, this book will be a necessary point of reference for any institution that aims to enhance international educational experience, especially through the use of technology.

Interculturality in International Education

Author: Jane Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 228

View: 935

This comprehensive volume provides a state-of-the-art overview of the key issues and developments in study abroad research and practice with a specific focus on the intercultural and language learning dimensions of the study abroad experience. Rather than looking at individual studies, the book seeks to capture the full complexity of the language learning and intercultural dynamics of study abroad by exploring a wide range of topics of particular interest to study abroad researchers and practitioners, including the role of individual differences, identity reconstruction and interculturality, the challenges of assessing learning outcomes, and recent pedagogical interventions designed to enhance and extend language learning and engagement in these contexts. The volume also takes a step back to look at future directions for study abroad research and offers innovative interventions in study abroad programming that emphasise its intercultural elements. This book is an authoritative resource for study abroad scholars and researchers in such fields as intercultural communication, applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, and language education.

Study Abroad, Second Language Acquisition and Interculturality

Author: Martin Howard

Publisher: Multilingual Matters

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 233

This book unites a range of emerging topics in the burgeoning transdisciplinary fields of second language acquisition and interculturality in a study abroad context. It explores key issues, trends and approaches within each strand and how the strands relate to one another, painting a big picture of the diversity and complexity underpinning second language acquisition in a study abroad context. The chapters highlight themes such as social networks, input and interaction issues, learner identities and study abroad in lingua franca contexts, while also presenting other themes spanning the breadth of second language acquisition and interculturality research, such as individual differences and linguistic development. This comprehensive and cohesive volume showcases the latest innovative research using quantitative, qualitative and mixed method approaches across a range of source and target language learner cohorts, and highlights emerging themes and directions for future research.

From Study Abroad to Education Abroad

Language Proficiency, Intercultural Competence, and Diversity

Author: Senta Goertler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 282

View: 856

Comprehensive and evidence-based, this book presents the best practices for designing and sustaining study abroad programs to maximize the outcomes and benefits of education abroad for all students. Distilling the history, research, and variations of study abroad programs, Goertler and Schenker provide a clear-eyed analysis of the lessons learned and the common obstacles associated with education abroad. Organized in three parts – the state of education abroad in the US; research on education abroad outcomes; and best practices – Goertler and Schenker demonstrate the benefits of long-term study abroad for the development of advanced language skills and intercultural competence, and the need for diversity in participation. Chapters offer theory-based, practice-proven recommendations to invigorate, innovate, and implement successful study abroad programs that are sustainable and ethically engage with the local community. The authors discuss design features to maximize language proficiency and intercultural competence. Grounded in up-to-date research and theory, the book responds to the challenges associated with long-term education abroad programs and provides recommendations on (re)invigorating long-term programs and diversifying participation in education abroad. From Study Abroad to Education Abroad is vital reading for academics, researchers, and students in the fields of language education and education policy, as well as practitioners, such as language program coordinators and education abroad administrators.

Study Abroad and interculturality

Perspectives and discourses

Author: Claudia Borghetti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 210

View: 306

Study abroad (SA) as a domain of inquiry in the field of Applied Linguistics has been approached from a variety of different perspectives. Although originally focused on measuring the impact of residence abroad on students’ language development, in the last decade the so-called ‘social’ turn in Second Language Acquisition has brought to the fore the importance of socio-cultural aspects of the students’ experiences (such as the amount of contact they have with the local community, their social networks, etc.). This focus on the students’ entire lived experiences in the destination country opened the door to an increased interest in analysing their language encounters in terms of intercultural learning. This new domain of investigation in SA research, focused on the students’ opportunities for intercultural development while abroad, is varied in terms of perspectives and discourses, as it catalyses the different interests and viewpoints of the various stakeholders, including educational institutions, international political organisations, teachers or the students themselves. This book gathers some of these voices, with contributions on topics such as the features, dynamics, advantages and shortcomings, preparation needs and pedagogical issues relating to student mobility in terms of the participants’ intercultural learning. This book was originally published as a special issue of Language and Intercultural Communication.

Living and Studying Abroad

Research and Practice

Author: Michael Byram

Publisher: Multilingual Matters

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 276

View: 589

'Living and Studying Abroad' looks at students who travel to other countries for study. It includes students travelling within Europe, from Europe and America to East Asia and China and vice versa. The articles report the results of research and also give detailed accounts of the research methods used.

Preparing to Study Abroad

Learning to Cross Cultures

Author: Steven T. Duke

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 162

View: 278

Study abroad is a potentially valuable experience in today’s global economy. With proper preparation it can be transformational. It can open you to the appreciation of other cultures; develop the transferable intercultural skills for interacting with people from different backgrounds; and deepen your self-awareness about your values and expectations. It can build confidence as you learn to navigate unfamiliar situations, and help you deal with the ambiguities of life. Study abroad also develops knowledge and insights about our interconnected world that will serve you well whether you choose a career in business, non-profits, education, or government. A recent study by IES Abroad found that many employers value the intercultural skills and personal development that students gain from their travel. Students who had studied abroad reported higher starting salaries and were more likely to have landed a job within six months of graduation than the national average. This book is written for you, as a student who is learning about the world first-hand, and probably traveling abroad for the first time. It addresses the challenges of adapting thinking and behavior as you travel in an unfamiliar environment, of making the most of the opportunities, and of meeting and interacting with the locals. This book is designed to help you prepare for your study abroad experience so you can get the most from it, and gain critical intercultural skills while crossing cultures. It offers strategies for learning about and exploring cultural differences and similarities of the country you will visit; and advice about how to actively observe and participate in the life of the locality in which you will find yourself. Each chapter illustrates key concepts through the personal accounts of students who have "been there, done that.” This book aims to help you with your own personal journey, and to make your study abroad experience as meaningful, rewarding, and insightful as possible.

Student Learning Abroad

What Our Students Are Learning, What They?re Not, and What We Can Do About It

Author: Michael Vande Berg

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 455

View: 153

A central purpose of this book is to question the claims commonly made about the educational benefits of study abroad. Traditional metrics of enrollment increases and student self-report, and practices of structural immersion, are being questioned as educators voice growing uncertainty about what students are or are not in fact learning abroad. This book looks into whether these criticisms are justified—and what can be done if they are. The contributors to this book offer a counter-narrative to common views that learning takes place simply through students studying elsewhere, or through their enrolling in programs that take steps structurally to “immerse” them in the experience abroad. Student Learning Abroad reviews the dominant paradigms of study abroad; marshals rigorous research findings, with emphasis on recent studies that offer convincing evidence about what undergraduates are or are not learning; brings to bear the latest knowledge about human learning and development that raises questions about the very foundations of current theory and practice; and presents six examples of study abroad courses or programs whose interventions apply this knowledge. This book provokes readers to reconsider long-held assumptions, beliefs and practices about teaching and learning in study abroad and to reexamine the design and delivery of their programs. In doing so, it provides a new foundation for responding to the question that may faculty and staff are now asking: What do I need to know, and what do I need to be able to do, to help my students learn and develop more effectively abroad? Contributors: Laura Bathurst Milton Bennett Gabriele Weber Bosley John Engle Lilli Engle Tara Harvey Mitchell Hammer David Kolb Bruce La Brack Kris Hemming Lou Kate McCleary Catherine Menyhart R. Michael Paige Angela Passarelli Adriana Medina-López Portillo Meghan Quinn Jennifer Meta Robinson Riikka Salonen Victor Savicki Douglas Stuart Michael Vande Berg James Zull While the authors who have contributed to Student Learning Abroad are all known for their work in advancing the field of education abroad, a number have recently been honored by leading international education associations. Bruce La Brack received NAFSA’s 2012 Teaching, Learning and Scholarship Award for Innovative Research and Scholarship. Michael Paige (2007) and Michael Vande Berg (2012) are recipients of the Forum on Education Abroad’s Peter A. Wollitzer Award.

Effect of Study Abroad on Intercultural Sensitivity

Author: Paula K. Patterson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Culture conflict

Page:

View: 779

One of the ways that students seek to prepare for the global job market is through studying abroad. Although little quantitative data has been collected to demonstrate the best way to develop intercultural sensitivity in students, the number of students participating in study abroad programs continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect study abroad has on the development of intercultural learning and sensitivity with students at a mid-sized state-supported university in the Midwest. The research compared this intercultural development in students participating in study abroad and in students participating in on-campus courses. Statistical functions used for data analysis included paired samples t-test and independent sample t-test. Qualitative data was collected from interviews with study abroad students and email questionnaires sent to on-campus students at the end of the semester. The qualitative data revealed voices of change in both groups. The data gathering tool for the quantitative data was the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) (Hammer & Bennett, 2001). The results of the statistical analysis revealed that the groups progressed differently on several scales of the Development Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) (Bennett, 1986, 1993). Neither group revealed significant changes. However, the study abroad group revealed noticeable changes and a small to moderate effect size.

Becoming Transcultural: Maximizing Study Abroad

Author: Kacy M. Peckenpaugh

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 452

View: 223

With rising demand for a workforce that can work cross-culturally (Mangan, 2011; Orahood, Woolf, & Kruze, 2008), it is not surprising that study abroad numbers continue to increase to a range of countries, destinations, and program types (Open Doors, 2012). However, while study abroad is often touted as the ideal means to incite linguistic and cultural competence, the reality of student learning is not a given (Alred & Byram, 2002; de Nooy & Hanna, 2003; Einbeck, 2002; Freed, 1995; Kearney, 2010; Kinginger, 2008; Kinginger, 2009; Rivers, 1998; Wilkinson, 2000). If higher education wishes to endorse study abroad as a means to acquire the crucial knowledge, skills, and attitudes of a globalized workforce (Miller, 2009), it is imperative that colleges and universities promote and integrate study abroad into the curriculum to foster the development of 21st century global citizens. In order to examine what businesses actually valued in hiring, Trooboff, Vande Berg, and Rayman (2007) surveyed employers and found not only that they valued study abroad as a form of international education, but also that they specifically valued many intercultural skills. However, on average, the respondents did not believe that studying abroad led to the enhancement of these skills, echoing the dominant discourse of study abroad being a frivolous endeavor for wealthy white women (Gore, 2005). Trooboff et al. (2007) noted that students need to be better trained to translate their experiences for their potential employers. In a similar vein, Root and Ngampornchai (2012) recommended that students be trained in intercultural communication to better help them articulate their learning. Nevertheless, Deardorff (2008) noted that intercultural training should not be limited to pre-departure orientation, but that a series of workshops or even a course could help address intercultural learning needs. While a number of courses of this nature have been offered either before departure or upon return (eg. With rising demand for a workforce that can work cross-culturally (Mangan, 2011; Orahood, Woolf, & Kruze, 2008), it is not surprising that study abroad numbers continue to increase to a range of countries, destinations, and program types (Open Doors, 2012). However, while study abroad is often touted as the ideal means to incite linguistic and cultural competence, the reality of student learning is not a given (Alred & Byram, 2002; de Nooy & Hanna, 2003; Einbeck, 2002; Freed, 1995; Kearney, 2010; Kinginger, 2008; Kinginger, 2009; Rivers, 1998; Wilkinson, 2000). If higher education wishes to endorse study abroad as a means to acquire the crucial knowledge, skills, and attitudes of a globalized workforce (Miller, 2009), it is imperative that colleges and universities promote and integrate study abroad into the curriculum to foster the development of 21st century global citizens. In order to examine what businesses actually valued in hiring, Trooboff, Vande Berg, and Rayman (2007) surveyed employers and found not only that they valued study abroad as a form of international education, but also that they specifically valued many intercultural skills. However, on average, the respondents did not believe that studying abroad led to the enhancement of these skills, echoing the dominant discourse of study abroad being a frivolous endeavor for wealthy white women (Gore, 2005). Trooboff et al. (2007) noted that students need to be better trained to translate their experiences for their potential employers. In a similar vein, Root and Ngampornchai (2012) recommended that students be trained in intercultural communication to better help them articulate their learning. Nevertheless, Deardorff (2008) noted that intercultural training should not be limited to pre-departure orientation, but that a series of workshops or even a course could help address intercultural learning needs. While a number of courses of this nature have been offered either before departure or upon return (eg. Brewer & Solberg, 2009; Downey, 2005), it appears that only one study to date examined the process of intercultural learning as it relates to study abroad (Anderson & Cunningham, 2009). The current study attempts to fill the gap in research by examining the effectiveness of a three-credit general education course in intercultural communication on the process of becoming interculturally competent. Additionally, it also examined the ability of post-study abroad students who enrolled in this course to articulate what they had learned while abroad in comparison with post-study abroad students who had not enrolled in the course. While most of the students (n = 33) participating in this study had enrolled in the course in intercultural communication were preparing to study abroad, there were also a number of participating students (n = 6) who had previously studied abroad. In this mixed-methods research, whose findings are reported in three separate, yet related, articles, answers to the following research questions were sought: 1. How does intercultural competence develop in post-study abroad students over the span of a semester-long course focused on the development of intercultural communication skills through critical reflection? The first article of this dissertation examines the process of unpacking the study abroad experience two students went through upon return to the home campus through the lens of experiential learning (Kolb, 1984), transformative learning (Mezirow, 2000), and ethnocentric versus ethnorelative worldviews (Bennett, 1993). The second article uses these same frameworks to investigate the learning process for four pre-study abroad students enrolled in this same course to answer the question: 2. Are there noticeable differences in the development of intercultural competence in pre-study abroad students who are enrolled in a semester-long course focused on the development of intercultural competence? Lastly, the third article examines how post-study abroad students articulated their learning abroad differently by answering the question: 3. Are post-study abroad.

Student Study Abroad Goals and Change in Intercultural Competence

Author: Tammera R. Maloney

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cultural competence

Page: 104

View: 247

University study abroad facilitators must maximize the benefits of a semester away from the home campus for students seeking to realize a transformational experience. Among the documented benefits of study abroad for students is the development of intercultural competence. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between student goals (excluding foreign language goals) for study abroad and change in intercultural competence. Data for this study was collected over four semesters from students (N = 78) who applied and were accepted to attend a study abroad program in a western European country. The study abroad program was hosted by a faith-based university in the Midwest. Participants were from the host university (n = 69) and other similar universities (n = 9). Participants were first-semester freshmen (n = 34), upperclassmen (n = 44), female (n = 61), and male (n = 17). The Study Abroad Goals Scale (SAGS) (Kitsantas, 2004) and the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) (Hammer, 2012) were administered within the first week of the semester. The IDI was administered again at the conclusion of the semester. Students were encouraged but not required to complete the instruments. Kitsantas' (2004) study on the role of goals as a predictor of cross-cultural development served as a model for this study. Two research questions guided this study. First, what is the relationship (correlation) between student goals as measured by the SAGS for their study abroad experience and change in intercultural competence as measured by the IDI? A Pearson r correlation analysis was run on each of the three SAGS subscales for the combined, freshmen, and upperclassmen participants. Results indicated a simple negative linear correlation on SAGS subscale two for the combined (r = -.279; p

From Study Abroad to Education Abroad

Language Proficiency, Intercultural Competence, and Diversity

Author: Senta Goertler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Educational equalization

Page: 282

View: 439

Comprehensive and evidence-based, this book presents the best practices for designing and sustaining study abroad programs to maximize the outcomes and benefits of education abroad for all students. Distilling the history, research, and variations of study abroad programs, Goertler and Schenker provide a clear-eyed analysis of the lessons learned and the common obstacles associated with education abroad. Organized in three parts - the state of education abroad in the US; research on education abroad outcomes; and best practices - Goertler and Schenker demonstrate the benefits of long-term study abroad for the development of advanced language skills and intercultural competence, and the need for diversity in participation. Chapters offer theory-based, practice-proven recommendations to invigorate, innovate, and implement successful study abroad programs that are sustainable and ethically engage with the local community. The authors discuss design features to maximize language proficiency and intercultural competence. Grounded in up-to-date research and theory, the book responds to the challenges associated with long-term education abroad programs and provides recommendations on (re)invigorating long-term programs and diversifying participation in education abroad. From Study Abroad to Education Abroad is vital reading for academics, researchers, and students in the fields of language education and education policy, as well as practitioners, such as language program coordinators and education abroad administrators.

Chinese Overseas Students and Intercultural Learning Environments

Academic Adjustment, Adaptation and Experience

Author: Jiani Zhu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 259

View: 525

What happens when East travels West? In today’s increasingly globalized world, these collisions are becoming increasingly common in universities– especially due to the growth of migratory students . As the largest international population studying abroad in the world, Chinese students’ learning experience in an intercultural environment calls for more attention. This book covers an array of problems common to Chinese students studying abroad and explores how these students academically adjust to an intercultural environment. It also highlights how they familiarize themselves with the education system, ranging from the types of courses, academic tasks and examinations to the structure of the education as a whole in the host country, as they negotiate the gulf between academic expectations at home versus those in the host university environment and communicate with domestic lecturers and students.

Developing Intercultural Competence and Transformation

Theory, Research, and Application in International Education

Author: Victor Savicki

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 396

View: 660

Enrollments in international education programs are projected to grow exponentially as students, parents, and university personnel seek to prepare future leaders who can live and work effectively in a global environment. What do we know about the outcomes of such programs, and how can educators become more intentional about designing, and assessing, the impact of such courses? How can we help students achieve the intercultural growth and transformation that they may envision as they set forth on their international sojourn? International education provides opportunities for students to grow personally, and to learn in a rich and intense educational environment. The outcomes of such opportunities emphasize not only traditional academic competence, but also changes in motivations, attitudes, self-identity, and values. It is these latter, co-academic, concepts that are the focus of this book. Its goal is to give solid substance to the growth and transformation approach to study abroad. It defines the central concept of intercultural competence, sets it within the framework of transformative learning theory, and offers ideas and strategies for facilitating its development. In doing so, it goes far beyond traditional emphases on the achievement of such formal skills as foreign language acquisition or specific knowledge of course content in national literatures, arts, or history. This book provides study abroad educators with a theoretical framework and examples of practice to craft more meaningful activities that will make a long-term difference in the quality of student experiences, and set the stage for transformative change. If we plan to send a million students a year to study abroad within the decade, we need approaches to maximize student growth outcomes in an efficient and effective way. It is also relevant for anyone engaged in courses in adult education, college student services, comparative and international education, international business, intercultural relations, and service learning that involve study abroad, and that raise corresponding issues of curriculum design.

Intercultural Communication and Values

Study Abroad and Art

Author: Stephanie Ann Houghton

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 88

View: 471

This textbook explores intercultural dialogue, and the negotiation and mediation of intercultural conflict by focusing on the systematic exploration of differences in values and concepts between people from different cultures. The role of values is also explored in relation to study abroad referring to genuine student accounts of their experiences of studying abroad in different countries and the broader academic literature.

Interculturality and Social Skills?

Relationships of the Stays Abroad of Students of Different Faculties with Intercultural and Social Competence

Author: Petia Genkova

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 378

Possessing skills in social and intercultural interaction is vitally important for employees who work in globalized environments, especially as people's working lives tend to involve an increasingly large amount of service-related activities. As a consequence, universities offer cultural studies courses and strive to enable their students to study abroad for a period of time. However, there is still no widely shared agreement on how intercultural experiences and cultural preparation courses predict the perception, thinking and acting of individuals. Therefore, the study at hand uses a cross-sectional design with N = 430 participants in order to investigate whether students of cultural studies gain more intercultural competencies during the time spent studying abroad, compared to studies of other subjects. The results reveal that students of cultural subjects show significantly higher levels of cultural empathy and openness in the post hoc measurement, even though there was no interaction effect with the amount of time spent studying abroad. Length of stay abroad had a significant indirect effect on social competence via all the dimensions of the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire. Moreover, results indicate that flexibility to adapt one's behaviour to cultural norms may predict problems when returning to one's home country.