How to Solve Mathematical Problems

Author: Wayne A. Wickelgren

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 584

Seven problem-solving techniques include inference, classification of action sequences, subgoals, contradiction, working backward, relations between problems, and mathematical representation. Also, problems from mathematics, science, and engineering with complete solutions.

Solving Mathematical Problems

A Personal Perspective

Author: Terence Tao

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 117

View: 647

Authored by a leading name in mathematics, this engaging and clearly presented text leads the reader through the tactics involved in solving mathematical problems at the Mathematical Olympiad level. With numerous exercises and assuming only basic mathematics, this text is ideal for students of 14 years and above in pure mathematics.

Posing and Solving Mathematical Problems

Advances and New Perspectives

Author: Patricio Felmer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 402

View: 179

This book collects recent research on posing and solving mathematical problems. Rather than treating these two crucial aspects of school mathematics as separate areas of study, the authors approach them as a unit where both areas are measured on equal grounds in relation to each other. The contributors are from a vast variety of countries and with a wide range of experience; it includes the work from many of the leading researchers in the area and an important number of young researchers. The book is divided in three parts, one directed to new research perspectives and the other two directed to teachers and students, respectively.

Youngsters Solving Mathematical Problems with Technology

The Results and Implications of the [email protected] Project

Author: Susana Carreira

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 255

View: 394

This book contributes to both mathematical problem solving and the communication of mathematics by students, and the role of personal and home technologies in learning beyond school. It does this by reporting on major results and implications of the [email protected] project that investigated youngsters’ mathematical problem solving and, in particular, their use of digital technologies in tackling, and communicating the results of their problem solving, in environments beyond school. The book has two focuses: Mathematical problem solving skills and strategies, forms of representing and expressing mathematical thinking, technological-based solutions; and students ́ and teachers ́ perspectives on mathematics learning, especially school compared to beyond-school mathematics.

Mathematical Problem Solving

Author: ALAN H. SCHOENFELD

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 409

View: 840

This book is addressed to people with research interests in the nature of mathematical thinking at any level, to people with an interest in "higher-order thinking skills" in any domain, and to all mathematics teachers. The focal point of the book is a framework for the analysis of complex problem-solving behavior. That framework is presented in Part One, which consists of Chapters 1 through 5. It describes four qualitatively different aspects of complex intellectual activity: cognitive resources, the body of facts and procedures at one's disposal; heuristics, "rules of thumb" for making progress in difficult situations; control, having to do with the efficiency with which individuals utilize the knowledge at their disposal; and belief systems, one's perspectives regarding the nature of a discipline and how one goes about working in it. Part Two of the book, consisting of Chapters 6 through 10, presents a series of empirical studies that flesh out the analytical framework. These studies document the ways that competent problem solvers make the most of the knowledge at their disposal. They include observations of students, indicating some typical roadblocks to success. Data taken from students before and after a series of intensive problem-solving courses document the kinds of learning that can result from carefully designed instruction. Finally, observations made in typical high school classrooms serve to indicate some of the sources of students' (often counterproductive) mathematical behavior.

Mathematical Problem Solving and New Information Technologies

Research in Contexts of Practice : [proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Advances in Mathematical Problem Solving Research, Held in Viana Do Castelo, Portugal, 27-30 April, 1991]

Author: Joao P. Ponte

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 346

View: 776

This NATO volume discusses the implications of new information technologies and cognitive psychology for mathematical problem solving research and practice. It includes a discussion of problem solving and provides a view of developments in computerized learning environments.

Mathematical Problem Solving

Current Themes, Trends, and Research

Author: Peter Liljedahl

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 362

View: 316

This book contributes to the field of mathematical problem solving by exploring current themes, trends and research perspectives. It does so by addressing five broad and related dimensions: problem solving heuristics, problem solving and technology, inquiry and problem posing in mathematics education, assessment of and through problem solving, and the problem solving environment. Mathematical problem solving has long been recognized as an important aspect of mathematics, teaching mathematics, and learning mathematics. It has influenced mathematics curricula around the world, with calls for the teaching of problem solving as well as the teaching of mathematics through problem solving. And as such, it has been of interest to mathematics education researchers for as long as the field has existed. Research in this area has generally aimed at understanding and relating the processes involved in solving problems to students’ development of mathematical knowledge and problem solving skills. The accumulated knowledge and field developments have included conceptual frameworks for characterizing learners’ success in problem solving activities, cognitive, metacognitive, social and affective analysis, curriculum proposals, and ways to promote problem solving approaches.

Solving Mathematical Problems

A Personal Perspective

Author: Terence Tao

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 116

View: 498

Authored by a leading name in mathematics, this engaging and clearly presented text leads the reader through the tactics involved in solving mathematical problems at the Mathematical Olympiad level. With numerous exercises and assuming only basic mathematics, this text is ideal for students of 14 years and above in pure mathematics.

Thinking in Problems

How Mathematicians Find Creative Solutions

Author: Alexander A. Roytvarf

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 405

View: 201

This concise, self-contained textbook gives an in-depth look at problem-solving from a mathematician’s point-of-view. Each chapter builds off the previous one, while introducing a variety of methods that could be used when approaching any given problem. Creative thinking is the key to solving mathematical problems, and this book outlines the tools necessary to improve the reader’s technique. The text is divided into twelve chapters, each providing corresponding hints, explanations, and finalization of solutions for the problems in the given chapter. For the reader’s convenience, each exercise is marked with the required background level. This book implements a variety of strategies that can be used to solve mathematical problems in fields such as analysis, calculus, linear and multilinear algebra and combinatorics. It includes applications to mathematical physics, geometry, and other branches of mathematics. Also provided within the text are real-life problems in engineering and technology. Thinking in Problems is intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the classroom or as a self-study guide. Prerequisites include linear algebra and analysis.