Sindarin Dictionary

Author: J-M Carpenter

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 188

View: 828

This unauthorised dictionary aims to be a comprehensive resource of Sindarin, bringing together every attested word from a large number of sources, into both Sindarin-English and English-Sindarin formats. This book also includes separate wordlists of all attested Doriathrin Sindarin words, and prepositions.--p. [4] of cover.

Flora of Middle-Earth

Plants of J.R.R. Tolkien's Legendarium

Author: Walter S. Judd

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 488

Few settings in literature are as widely known or celebrated as J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth. The natural landscape plays a major role in nearly all of Tolkien's major works, and readers have come to view the geography of this fictional universe as integral to understanding and enjoying Tolkien's works. And in laying out this continent, Tolkien paid special attention to its plant life; in total, over 160 plants are explicitly mentioned and described as a part of Middle-Earth. Nearly all of these plants are real species, and many of the fictional plants are based on scientifically grounded botanic principles. In Flora of Middle Earth: Plants of Tolkien's Legendarium, botanist Walter Judd gives a detailed species account of every plant found in Tolkien's universe, complete with the etymology of the plant's name, a discussion of its significance within Tolkien's work, a description of the plant's distribution and ecology, and an original hand-drawn illustration by artist Graham Judd in the style of a woodcut print. Among the over three-thousand vascular plants Tolkien would have seen in the British Isles, the authors show why Tolkien may have selected certain plants for inclusion in his universe over others, in terms of their botanic properties and traditional uses. The clear, comprehensive alphabetical listing of each species, along with the visual identification key of the plant drawings, adds to the reader's understanding and appreciation of the Tolkien canon.

An Introduction to Elvish

And to Other Tongues and Proper Names and Writing Systems of the Third Age of the Western Lands of Middle-Earth as Set Forth in the Published Writings of Professor John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

Author: Nina Carson

Publisher: Brans Head Books

ISBN:

Category: Fantasy fiction, English

Page: 303

View: 562

A Fan's Guide to Neo-Sindarin

Author: Fiona Jallings

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 360

View: 295

Enchanted with Elvish? This is Neo-Sindarin, the language as it has flourished on the Internet using Tolkien's creation as a roadmap. This book functions as a friendly introduction to the Neo-Sindarin community. Included is the most current information available to fans. Within explore Neo-Sindarin academics, learn simple linguistic concepts, practice useful phrases while studying grammar, and look at the world through Elven eyes: from how they count on their fingers to how they organize the cosmos. Govano ven! (Join us!)

Amon Hen

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 510

From Elvish to Klingon

Exploring Invented Languages

Author: Michael Adams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 294

View: 504

This fascinating book takes invented languages and explores the origins, purpose, and usage of these curious artefacts of culture. Written by experts in the field, chapters discuss a wide range of languages - from Esperanto to Klingon - and uncover the motives behind their creation and the outcomes of their existence.

Translating Tolkien

Text and Film

Author: Thomas Honegger

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Lord of the Rings films

Page: 243

View: 357

Twelve essays dealing with the problems and challenges connected with translating Tolkien's work into different languages, as well as into film.

The Lord of the Rings, 1954-2004

Scholarship in Honor of Richard E. Blackwelder

Author: Richard E. Blackwelder

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 387

View: 361

The fiftieth anniversary of the first publication of The Lord of the Rings, the enormously popular and influential masterpiece of fantasy by J.R.R. Tolkien, is celebrated in these twenty papers presented at the Marquette University Tolkien conference of 21-23 October 2004. They are published in honor of the late Dr. Richard E. Blackwelder, who gave his important Tolkien collection to the Marquette University Libraries, long a major center for Tolkien research. Half of the papers in this book focus on The Lord of the Rings, while others investigate the larger body of Tolkien's achievements, as a writer of fiction, a maker of language, and one of the leading philologists of his day. The contributors to The Lord of the Rings, 1954-2004 include a "who's who" of scholars in Tolkien studies: Douglas A. Anderson, David Bratman, Marjorie Burns, Jane Chance, Michael D.C. Drout, Matthew A. Fisher, Verlyn Flieger, Mike Foster, John Garth, Wayne G. Hammond, Carl F. Hostetter, Sumner G. Hunnewell, John D. Rateliff, Christina Scull, T.A. Shippey, Arden R. Smith, Paul Edmund Thomas, Richard C. West, and Arne Zettersten. As preface, Charles B. Elston, former director of Special Collections and University Archives, provides a reminiscence of Dr. Blackwelder and his generosity to Marquette. Fans and students of Tolkien alike will find these essays informative and entertaining.

J. R. R. Tolkien's Sanctifying Myth

Understanding Middle-earth

Author: Bradley J. Birzer

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 245

View: 469

Since the appearance of The Lord of the Rings in 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien’s works have always sold briskly, appealing to a wide and diverse audience of intellectuals, religious believers, fantasy enthusiasts, and science fiction aficionados. Now, Peter Jackson’s film version of Tolkien’s trilogy—with its accompanying Rings-related paraphernalia and publicity—is playing a unique role in the dissemination of Tolkien’s imaginative creation to the masses. Yet, for most readers and viewers, the underlying meaning of Middle-earth has remained obscure. Bradley Birzer has remedied that with this fresh study. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle-earth, Birzer explains the surprisingly specific religious symbolism that permeates Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. He also explores the social and political views that motivated the Oxford don, ultimately situating Tolkien within the Christian humanist tradition represented by Thomas More and T. S. Eliot, Dante and C. S. Lewis. Birzer argues that through the genre of myth Tolkien created a world that is essentially truer than the one we think we see around us every day, a world that transcends the colorless disenchantment of our postmodern age. “A small knowledge of history,” Tolkien once wrote, “depresses one with the sense of the everlasting weight of human iniquity.” As Birzer demonstrates, Tolkien’s recognition of evil became mythologically manifest in the guise of Ringwraiths, Orcs, Sauron, and other dark beings. But Tolkien was ultimately optimistic: even weak, bumbling hobbits and humans, as long as they cling to the Good, can finally prevail. Bradley Birzer has performed a great service in elucidating Tolkien’s powerful moral vision.