Silence Is My Mother Tongue

A Novel

Author: Sulaiman Addonia

Publisher: Graywolf Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 208

View: 280

A sensuous, textured novel of life in a refugee camp, long-listed for the Orwell Prize for Political Fiction On a hill overlooking a refugee camp in Sudan, a young man strings up bedsheets that, in an act of imaginative resilience, will serve as a screen in his silent cinema. From the cinema he can see all the comings and goings in the camp, especially those of two new arrivals: a girl named Saba, and her mute brother, Hagos. For these siblings, adapting to life in the camp is not easy. Saba mourns the future she lost when she was forced to abandon school, while Hagos, scorned for his inability to speak, must live vicariously through his sister. Both resist societal expectations by seeking to redefine love, sex, and gender roles in their lives, and when a businessman opens a shop and befriends Hagos, they cast off those pressures and make an unconventional choice. With this cast of complex, beautifully drawn characters, Sulaiman Addonia details the textures and rhythms of everyday life in a refugee camp, and questions what it means to be an individual when one has lost all that makes a home or a future. Intimate and subversive, Silence Is My Mother Tongue dissects the ways society wages war on women and explores the stories we must tell to survive in a broken, inhospitable environment.

Mother Tongue and Other Tongues

Narratives in Multilingual Psychotherapy

Author: Shula Wilson

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 160

View: 150

We are living in times where the issue of identity and difference has taken on a more defensive hue. The tide is turning towards an inward-looking nostalgia of sameness based on fear rather than on understanding. The experience of hearing another language, the way it is spoken, and being faced with the image of the other is now more complex, imbued with projections of powerlessness, fear, terrorism, and survival. The issue of identity appears to have become even more complex. All cultures are concerned with how we speak and communicate as this represents identity, history, and home. Communication is also essential for survival, both emotionally and socially. The speaking person is an individual but also part of a culture or cultures with dense collective and individual shapes. The issue of identity, that feeling of belonging, is essential, full of possibility, and, at times, very uncomfortable, as it touches the tensions between who we are and who we are becoming. This sits next to more complex historical experiences and memories of languages and cultures being changed or lost or banished due to the colonial, imperial, and regional moves of powerful nations in search of conquest and economic gain. This collection addresses how language affects therapists and their patients, and how it can be understood culturally and therapeutically. Drawn from talks given at the Multi-lingual Psychotherapy Centre (MLPC), the contributors not only bring a therapeutic slant but also their other roles as academics, writers, and artists. These reflections, memories, and stories give a glimpse of the multilingual journey the MLPC has been exploring for over twenty years, and leave much food for thought.

She Tries Her Tongue, Her Silence Softly Breaks

Author: M. NourbeSe Philip

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 110

View: 880

Brilliant, lyrical, and passionate, this collection from the acclaimed poet M. NourbeSe Philip is an extended jazz riff running along the themes of language, racism, colonialism, and exile. In this groundbreaking collection, Philip defiantly challenges and resoundingly overthrows the silencing of black women through appropriation of language, offering no less than superb poetry resonant with beauty and strength. She Tries Her Tongue, Her Silence Softly Breaks was originally published in 1989 and won the Casa de Las Americas Prize. This new Wesleyan edition includes a foreword by Evie Shockley. An online reader's companion will be available at http://nourbesephilip.site.wesleyan.edu.

African Migration, Human Rights and Literature

Author: Fareda Banda

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 376

View: 155

This innovative book looks at the topic of migration through the prism of law and literature. The author uses a rich mix of novels, short stories, literary realism, human rights and comparative literature to explore the experiences of African migrants and asylum seekers. The book is divided into two. Part one is conceptual and focuses on art activism and the myriad ways in which people have sought to 'write justice.' Using Mazrui's diasporas of slavery and colonialism, it then considers histories of migration across the centuries before honing in on the recent anti-migration policies of western states. Achiume is used to show how these histories of imposition and exploitation create a bond which bestows on Africans a “status as co-sovereigns of the First World through citizenship.” The many fictional examples of the schemes used to gain entry are set against the formal legal processes. Attention is paid to life post-arrival which for asylum seekers may include periods in detention. The impact of the increased hostility of receiving states is examined in light of their human rights obligations. Consideration is paid to how Africans navigate their post-migration lives which includes reconciling themselves to status fracture-taking on jobs for which they are over-qualified, while simultaneously dealing with the resentment borne of status threat on the part of the citizenry. Part two moves from the general to consider the intersections of gender and status focusing on women, LGBTI individuals and children. Focusing on their human rights and the fictional literature, chapter four looks at women who have been trafficked as well as domestic workers and hotel maids while chapter five is on LGBTI people whose legal and literary stories are only now being told. The final substantive chapter considers the experiences of children who may arrive as unaccompanied minors. Using a mixture of poetry and first person accounts, the chapter examines the post-arrival lives of children, some of whom may be citizens but who are continually made to feel like outsiders. The conclusion follows, starting with two stories about walls by Hadero and Lanchester which are used to illustrate the themes discussed in the book. Few African lawyers write about literature and few books and articles in Western law and literature look at books by or about Africans, so a book that engages with both is long overdue. This book provides fascinating reading for academics, students of law, literature, gender and migration studies, and indeed the general public.

Working with Difference and Diversity in Counselling and Psychotherapy

Author: Rose Cameron

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 176

View: 193

This book guides you through the complexities of working with difference and diversity in counselling and psychotherapy. It introduces you to contemporary thinking on the construction of difference, social identity and culture, and applies the theory to therapy practice. With reflective exercises and case examples, it will help you to work more confidently and sensitively with difference. Rose Cameron is a practitioner and a trainer in counselling and psychotherapy. She is currently a Teaching Fellow at the University of Edinburgh.

Broken Silence

A Secret Life of Abuse

Author: Nesa Chappelle

Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 236

View: 398

Broken Silence: A Secret Life of Abuse chronicles the life of Nesa Chappelle, Ph.D., who experienced abuse, beginning in childhood, from people in her life who were supposed to love her, including her mother, her stepfather, and her husbands. Her mother and father were never married. Her mother, who was cold and distant toward Nesa, suffered physical abuse from her husband. Other female relatives suffered physical and/or emotional abuse from the men in their lives. Nesa's father, a hustler, enjoyed the good life - fancy cars, fine clothes, and pretty women - but he emotionally abused those women. Growing up in this life not only triggered her quest as a young adult for "a good husband," but also instilled in her a thirst for knowledge and success. Nesa wanted the good life, so she pursued education - a bachelor's degree, a master's degree, and a Ph.D. - which enabled her to land well-paying professional positions and to live an upper-middle-class lifestyle. To her colleagues, she had it all. Only a few close friends and relatives knew about her secret life: A pattern of entering into relationships and marriages to men who abused her mentally, physically, and/or emotionally. After enduring nearly two years of mental and emotional abuse in her marriage to husband number six, her life turned a corner. Nesa found God, sought domestic abuse counseling, and decided to write this book. The healing has begun. About the Author Nesa Chappelle, Ph.D., is a feminist scholar who is dedicated to influencing social and political policy that affects black and Hispanic women and victims of domestic violence. Chappelle holds a bachelor's degree in Spanish language and business education from the University of the District of Columbia, a master's degree in multicultural education from George Mason University, and a doctoral degree in political science, public administration, and education administration and supervision from Howard University. Visit www.spiritdriven2.com

Understanding Silence and Reticence

Ways of Participating in Second Language Acquisition

Author: Dat Bao

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 228

What is the state of that which is not spoken? This book presents empirical research related to the phenomenon of reticence in the second language classroom, connecting current knowledge and theoretical debates in language learning and acquisition. Why do language learners remain silent or exhibit reticence? In what ways can silence in the language learning classroom be justified? To what extent should learners employ or modify silence? Do quiet learners work more effectively with quiet or verbal learners? Looking at evidence from Australia, China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, the book presents research data on many internal and external forces that influence the silent mode of learning in contemporary education. This work gives the reader a chance to reflect more profoundly on cultural ways of learning languages.

The Silent Experiences of Young Bilingual Learners

A Sociocultural Study into the Silent Period

Author: Caroline Bligh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 142

View: 902

Many teachers are increasingly concerned with how to best support the learning of the rising numbers of bilingual learners in schools – particularly those children who are new to English and therefore cannot yet communicate with the teacher or their peers in their first language – during the silent period. This book offers an alternative insight to that which is most commonly available to teachers and researchers, as instead of examining language acquisition purely from a linguistic approach; it explores the learning that is occurring through a sociocultural lens and even more significantly, from the young child’s perspective – the worm’s eye view. Investigated through the experiences of young bilingual learners allows the reader to make sense of the making meaning that occurs when the child cannot make sense of his/her new ‘world’; nor communicate verbally in the language of instruction in the classroom. Remarkably, learning through the silent period is revealed as both complex and ‘messy’ as the bilingual child mediates his or her own learning through a synthesis of alternative learning pathways. The silent period is presented as a crucial time for learning; distributed through a synthesis of close observation, intense listening and most significantly copying the practices of others. Throughout the silent period the children are not only seen to be learning but also contributing to the classroom practices. The book not only initiates new understandings of second language learning, but also offers creative ideas on how to raise the achievement of children who are learning English as an additional language.

Livingstone's 'lives'

A metabiography of a Victorian icon

Author: Justin Livingstone

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 439

David Livingstone, the ‘missionary-explorer’, has attracted more commentary than nearly any other Victorian hero. Beginning in the years following his death, he soon became the subject of a major biographical tradition. Yet out of this extensive discourse, no unified image of Livingstone emerges. Rather, he has been represented in diverse ways and in a variety of socio-political contexts. Until now, no one has explored Livingstone’s posthumous reputation in full. This book meets the challenge. In approaching Livingstone’s complex legacy, it adopts a metabiographical perspective: in other words, this book is a biography of biographies. Rather than trying to uncover the true nature of the subject, metabiography is concerned with the malleability of biographical representation. It does not aim to uncover Livingstone’s ‘real’ identity, but instead asks: what has he been made to mean? Crossing disciplinary boundaries, Livingstone’s 'lives' will interest scholars of imperial history, postcolonialism, life-writing, travel-writing and Victorian studies.

Mother Tongue Theologies

Poets, Novelists, Non-Western Christianity

Author: Darren J. N. Middleton

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 787

Recognizing that one-third of the world's Christians practice their faith outside Europe and North America, the fourteen essays in Mother Tongue Theologies explore how international fiction depicts Christianity's dramatic movement South and East of Jerusalem as well as North and West. Structured by geographical region, this collection captures the many ways in which people around the globe receive Christianity. It also celebrates postcolonial literature's diversity. And it highlights non-Western authors' biblical literacy, addressing how and why locally rooted Christians invoke Scripture in their pursuit of personal as well as social transformation. Featured authors include Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constantine Cavafy, Scott Cairns, Chinua Achebe, Madam Afua Kuma, Earl Lovelace, V. S. Reid, Ernesto Cardenal, Helena Parente Cunha, Arundhati Roy, Mary Martha Sherwood, Marguerite Butler, R. M. Ballantyne, Rudyard Kipling, Nora Okja Keller, Amy Tan, Albert Wendt, and Louise Erdrich. Individual essayists rightly come to different conclusions about Christianity's global character. Some connect missionary work with colonialism as well as cultural imperialism, for example, and yet others accentuate how indigenous cultures amalgamate with Christianity's foreignness to produce mesmerizing, multiple identities. Differences notwithstanding, Mother Tongue Theologies delves into the moral and spiritual issues that arise out of the cut and thrust of native responses to Western Christian presence and pressure. Ultimately, this anthology suggests the reward of listening for and to such responses, particularly in literary art, will be a wider and deeper discernment of the merits and demerits of post-Western Christianity, especially for Christians living in the so-called post-Christian West.

Exile and Return as Poetics of Identity in Contemporary Anglo-Caribbean Literature

Becoming Home

Author: Eleonora Natalia Ravizza

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 229

View: 594

In contemporary Anglo-Caribbean literature, the dialectic interrelations of “exile” and “return” are essential for conveying meta-reflections on literature and language, as well as the role they play in the construction of personal and collective identities. While this volume focuses on the specificity of a cultural area whose history is marked by colonialism, diaspora, slavery and racial conflicts, it also raises epistemological questions surrounding the complexity of literature, and its function in a world which is ever more composite, hybrid and transcultural. By developing a new, systematic approach which combines post-colonial studies, theories of intertextuality and philosophy of language, it explores how contemporary literary texts reflect, elaborate and redefine the experiences of societies that are currently dealing with ever-growing global interdependencies and newly-formed cultural and semiotic context.

On and Off the Page

Mapping Place in Text and Culture

Author: Ari J. Adipurwawidjana

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 340

View: 515

This collection of essays, comprised of research first presented at the seventh annual Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture, explores one of the most pervasive, vexing, and alluring concepts in the Humanities, that of place. Including essays which encompass a broad range of research fields and methodologies, from Geography to Cybernetics, it presents a cross-section of approaches aimed revealing the complex cultural machinations behind what once may have seemed a static, one-dimensional topic. Investigations into the function of place as a force in contemporary culture inevitably reveal a long history of the interplay between place and cultural product, between 'context' and 'text'. Just as traditional cultures mythologize sacred spaces, so too has Western culture sanctified its own places through its literature. Imagined places such as Faulker’s Yoknapatawpha or Joyce’s Dublin become the focus of conferences and festivals; authors’ homes, birthplaces, and gravesites are transformed into sites of pilgrimage; locales created for television shows and movies become actual businesses catering to a public for whom the line between fantasy and reality is increasingly blurred; and persisting through the great cultural shifts of the past two hundred years is the popular and romantic notion that words, performances, narratives, and even national identities are always in some way an expression of the places in which they are created and set. With the idea of place foregrounded in so much contemporary discourse, this collection promises to enter into an already lively debate and one which, due to its relevance to where we live and how we make sense of our own “places” within them, does not show any signs of flagging.

The Autobiography of a Language

Emanuel Carnevali's Italian/American Writing

Author: Andrea Ciribuco

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 937

Explores the links between language, cultural identity, and creativity through the works of Emanuel Carnevali, one of the first Italian American authors to attain literary recognition.

Languages and Literacies as Mobile and Placed Resources

Author: Sue Nichols

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 133

Languages and Literacies as Mobile and Placed Resources explores how languages and literacies are implicated in the complex relationship between place and mobility. It is a book that represents the next wave in literacy studies in which theories of mobility, networking and globalisation have emerged to account for the dynamic landscape of globally circulating communication resources. Authors in this volume take up a more complex way of thinking about resources, applying it to consider languages and literacies as assemblages or as parts of assemblages that are involved in learning, teaching and meaning-making. The book addresses forms of text and mobility that arise in contexts outside of formal education including marketing, charity, journalism, community organisation and parenting. It also addresses school contexts and higher education settings. Key topics explored include: Consequences of workplace confinement Literacies as placed resources in the context of rural communities Literacy, sustainability and landscapes for learning Documenting networked knowledge on tablets Mobilising literacy policy through resources Global Englishes as placed resources Languages as contextualised resources Shaping a digital academic writing resource in a transcultural space With an international range of carefully chosen contributors, this book is a must read text for all academics interested in semiotics and literacy studies.

Tell This Silence

Asian American Women Writers and the Politics of Speech

Author: Patti Duncan

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 276

View: 379

Tell This Silence by Patti Duncan explores multiple meanings of speech and silence in Asian American women's writings in order to explore relationships among race, gender, sexuality, and national identity. Duncan argues that contemporary definitions of U.S. feminism must be expanded to recognize the ways in which Asian American women have resisted and continue to challenge the various forms of oppression in their lives. There has not yet been adequate discussion of the multiple meanings of silence and speech, especially in relation to activism and social-justice movements in the U.S. In particular, the very notion of silence continues to invoke assumptions of passivity, submissiveness, and avoidance, while speech is equated with action and empowerment. However, as the writers discussed in Tell This Silence suggest, silence too has multiple meanings especially in contexts like the U.S., where speech has never been a guaranteed right for all citizens. Duncan argues that writers such as Maxine Hong Kingston, Mitsuye Yamada, Joy Kogawa, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Nora Okja Keller, and Anchee Min deploy silence as a means of resistance. Juxtaposing their “unofficial narratives” against other histories—official U.S. histories that have excluded them and American feminist narratives that have stereotyped them or distorted their participation—they argue for recognition of their cultural participation and offer analyses of the intersections among gender, race, nation, and sexuality. Tell This Silence offers innovative ways to consider Asian American gender politics, feminism, and issues of immigration and language. This exciting new study will be of interest to literary theorists and scholars in women's, American, and Asian American studies.

My Father’s Books

Author: Luan Starova

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 136

View: 491

In My Father’s Books, the first volume in Luan Starova’s multivolume Balkan Saga, he explores themes of history, displacement, and identity under three turbulent regimes—Ottoman, Fascist, and Stalinist—in the twentieth century. Weaving a story from the threads of his parents’ lives from 1926 to 1976, he offers a child’s-eye view of personal relationships in shifting political landscapes and an elegiac reminder of the enduring power of books to sustain a literate culture. Through lyrical waves of memory, Starova reveals his family’s overlapping religious, linguistic, national, and cultural histories. His father left Constantinople as the Ottoman Empire collapsed, and the young family fled from Albania to Yugoslav Macedonia when Luan was a boy. His parents, cosmopolitan and well-traveled in their youth, and steeped in the cultures of both Orient and Occident, find themselves raising their children in yet another stagnant and repressive state. Against this backdrop, Starova remembers the protected spaces of his childhood—his mother’s walled garden, his father’s library, the cupboard holding the rarest and most precious of his father’s books. Preserving a lost heritage, these books also open up a world that seems wide, deep, and boundless.

Silent Crusader

Author: Shubhang Chauhan

Publisher: Shubhang Chauhan

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 158

Compelling tale of short stories that will make you ponder

Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century

Poetics Across North America

Author: Claudia Rankine

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 464

View: 946

Eleven More American Women Poets in the 21st Century is an exciting sequel to its predecessors in the American Poets in the 21st Century series. Like the earlier anthologies, this volume includes generous selections of poetry by some of the best poets of our time as well as illuminating poetics statements and incisive essays on their work. This unique organization makes these books invaluable teaching tools. Broadening the lens through which we look at contemporary poetry, this new volume extends its geographical net by including Caribbean and Canadian poets. Representing three generations of women writers, among the insightful pieces included in this volume are essays by Karla Kelsey on Mary Jo Bang’s modes of artifice, Christine Hume on Carla Harryman’s kinds of listening, Dawn Lundy Martin on M. NourbeSe Phillip (for whom “english / is a foreign anguish”), and Sina Queyras on Lisa Robertson’s confoundingly beautiful surfaces. A companion web site will present audio of each poet’s work.

Thamyris Vol 2.2

Author: Nanny M. W. de Vries, Jan Best

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 347