Sex and Sexuality in Classical Athens

Author: James Robson

Publisher: Debates and Documents in Ancient History

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 434

From courtship and marriage to adultery and prostitution, Sex and Sexuality in Classical Athens takes a broad look at the sex lives and sexual beliefs of ancient Athenians. Chapters such as "same-sex relationships" and "sex and the law" explore both ancient accounts of sexual behaviour and the different ways in which modern scholars have understood them. This book also contains a wide selection of original sources, providing direct access to the ancient evidence. Through engaging with ancient documents and modern debates, readers are encouraged to reach their own conclusions about the scholarly controversies that still rage about this fascinating area of Greek life.

King and Court in Ancient Persia 559 to 331 BCE

Author: Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 842

The first Persian Empire (559-331 BCE) was the biggest land empire the world had seen, and seated at the heart of its vast dominions, in the south of modern-day Iran, was the person of the Great King. Immortalized in Greek literature as despotic tyrants, a new vision of Persian monarchy is emerging from Iranian, and other, sources (literary, visual, and archaeological), which show the Kings in a very different light. Inscriptions of Cyrus, Darius, Xerxes, and their heirs present an image of Persian rulers as liberators, peace-makers, valiant warriors, righteous god-fearing judges, and law-makers.Around them the Kings established lavish and sophisticated courts, the centres of political decision-making and cultural achievements in which the image of monarchy was endorsed and advanced by an almost theatrical display of grandeur and power.This book explores the representation of Persian monarchy and the court of the Achaemenid Great Kings from the point of view of the ancient Iranians themselves and th

Rome and its Empire, AD 193-284

Author: Olivier Hekster

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 313

This was a time of civil war, anarchy, intrigue, and assassination.Between 193 and 284 the Roman Empire knew more than twenty-five emperors, and an equal number of usurpers. All of them had some measure of success, several of them often ruling different parts of the Empire at the same time. Rome's traditional political institutions slid into vacuity and armies became the Empire's most powerful institutions, proclaiming their own imperial champions and deposing those they held to be incompetent.Yet despite widespread contemporary dismay at such weak government this period was also one in which the boundaries of the Empire remained fairly stable; the rights and privileges of Roman citizenship were extended equally to all free citizens of the Empire; in several regions the economy remained robust in the face of rampant inflation; and literary culture, philosophy, and legal theory flourished. Historians have been discussing how and why this could have been for centuries. Olivier Hekster takes you to th

Roman Imperialism

Author: Andrew Erskine

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 263

The transformation of Rome from a small central Italian city-state into the sole Mediterranean superpower has long proved fascinating and controversial. At its height the Roman Empire extended from Britain in the North to Libya in the South and from Spain in the West to Syria in the East. It has impressed not only by its extent but also by its longevity. Andrew Erskine examines the course and nature of Roman expansion, focusing on explanations, ancient and modern, the impact of Roman rule on the subject and the effect of empire on the imperial power. All these topics have created a tremendous amount of discussion among scholars, not least because the study of Roman imperialism has always been informed by contemporary perceptions of international power relations. The book is divided into two halves. Part I treats some of the main issues in modern debates about Roman imperialism, while Part II offers a selection of the most important source material allowing readers to enter these debates themselves

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History, 2nd Edition, McNeil-Bently-Christian-Croiser, 2010

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History

Author: Berkshire Publishing Group, LLC.

Publisher: Bukupedia

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 3064

View: 954

Reader’s Guide From the earliest stages of planning the encyclopedia to its fruition as a second edition, our goal has been to present a body of knowledge whose core is about the movement, interaction, and change that has shaped the world. With that continued focus, on connections and movements over and across time and place, we’ve designed our Reader’s Guide. Its thirtyfi ve topical, alphabetically organized categories— under which we list all the entries relevant to each category—emphasize the ways in which a specifi c subject can apply to more than one broad fi eld of study. Textiles, for instance, can reveal a people’s aesthetic sense and development, as well as provide insight about socioeconomic, political, and cultural aspects of a people. Thus the article “Textiles” appears under the categories Arts and Literature, Commerce—Trade Goods and Products, and Daily Life. The categories themselves often refl ect important themes—lenses through which we view a particular aspect of history—such as Confl ict and War or Diplomacy and Peace. Some categories are based on geographical constructs, others on governments or states. Still others group processes, models, or forces that have driven history over the centuries. We’ve “dispersed” the names in our Biography category to indicate the places where these fi gures had their primary or initial infl uence, and (wherever possible) the fi eld, discipline, or specifi c topic in which they made an impact. The British political economist Thomas Malthus (1766–1834), for example, one of the fi rst to warn against the dangers of overpopulation, appears under Environment and Ecology; Europe; Philosophy, Ideas, and Thoughts; and Population, while we list Olaudah Equiano (1745–1797), the African writer and abolitionist, under Africa; Americas; and Social and Political Protest Movements. We include the Reader’s Guide here—and of course in its interactive form for online subscriptions—as a valuable resource for students, teachers, course planners, and general readers alike.

The Body in History

Europe from the Palaeolithic to the Future

Author: John Robb

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 106

This book is a long-term history of how the human body has been understood in Europe from the Palaeolithic to the present day, focusing on specific moments of change. Developing a multi-scalar approach to the past, and drawing on the work of an interdisciplinary team of experts, the authors examine how the body has been treated in life, art and death for the last 40,000 years. Key case-study chapters examine Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, Classical, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern bodies. What emerges is not merely a history of different understandings of the body, but a history of the different human bodies that have existed. Furthermore, the book argues, these bodies are not merely the product of historical circumstance, but are themselves key elements in shaping the changes that have swept across Europe since the arrival of modern humans.

Sexual Asymmetry

Studies in Ancient Society

Author: Josine Blok

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Femmes - Histoire - Jusqu'à 500

Page: 298

View: 497

This book deals with the Iecur Placentinum, the bronze model of a sheep s liver, bearing 42 Etruscan inscriptions. The Piacenza Liver is a highly interesting document of the utmost importance for the understanding of Etruscan religion. It will appear that the network with the inscribed names of divinities on both sides of the Liver depicts a microcosmos reflecting the macrocosmos, the Etruscan division of heaven.

The Greeks and Greek Love

A Radical Reappraisal of Homosexuality in Ancient Greece

Author: James N. Davidson

Publisher: George Weidenfeld & Nicholson

ISBN:

Category: Greece

Page: 634

View: 631

Though the issue of Greek homosexuality has been the subject of extensive research and debate in recent years, Kenneth Dover's 1978 GREEK HOMOSEXUALITY remains the most recent single-volume treatment of the subject as a whole. Drawing on fifteen years of ensuing research, James Davidson rejects Dover's excessively theoretical approach, using a wide variety of sources unknown to him - court cases, romantic novels, satirical plays and poems - to present a view of the subject that, in contrast to Dover and to Foucault, stresses the humanity of the ancient Greeks, and how they lived their loves and pleasures, rather than their moral codes and the theorising of philosophers. Homosexuality in Ancient Greece remains a central area of debate in the classics, in ancient history and lesbian and gay studies. Greek civilisation centrally underpins our own, providing a basis of so much of the west's culture and philosophy, yet the Greeks were more tolerant of homosexuality than virtually any other culture, certainly than the western civilisations that followed. The extent to which Greek attitudes to sexuality and in particular their privileging of 'Greek Love' were comparable and different to our own underlies the continuing debate over the formation of sexuality (is it natural or cultural?) as well as, both then and in our own time, the much wider question of the roles of nature and nurture in the formation of human behaviour and personality.

Abortion in the Ancient World

Author: K. A. Kapparis

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 594

In this important new study, Professor Kapparis extrapolates the views of ancient physicians on abortion from a detailed investigation of the medical facts, medical and philosophical theories concerning the human status of the unborn in antiquity, the Hippocratic Oath, and other important documents on Greek medical ethics. He explores the reasons why women in antiquity sought abortions, male concerns and attitudes towards abortion, and religious, social, cultural and demographic trends influencing the legal status of abortion in antiquity.

Classical Mythology

Author: Mark P. O. Morford

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 854

View: 611

Offers a comprehensive presentation of the principle myths of Greece and Rome and their relationship to actual history.