Seashaken Houses

A Lighthouse History from Eddystone to Fastnet

Author: Tom Nancollas

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 909

'A thrilling celebration of lighthouses' i newspaper An enthralling history of Britain's rock lighthouses, and the people who built and inhabited them Lighthouses are enduring monuments to our relationship with the sea. They encapsulate a romantic vision of solitary homes amongst the waves, but their original purpose was much more noble, conceived as navigational gifts for the safety of all. Still today, we depend upon their guiding lights for the safe passage of ships. Nowhere is this truer than in the rock lighthouses of Great Britain and Ireland: twenty towers built between 1811 and 1904, so-called because they were constructed on desolate, slippery rock formations in the middle of the sea, rising, mirage-like, straight out of the waves, with lights shining at the their summits. Seashaken Houses is a lyrical exploration of these magnificent, isolated sentinels, the ingenuity of those who conceived them, the people who risked their lives building and rebuilding them, those that inhabited their circular rooms, and the ways in which we value emblems of our history in a changing world.

Seashaken Houses

A Lighthouse History from Eddystone to Fastnet

Author: Tom Nancollas

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Eddystone (Devon, England)

Page: 235

View: 132

"Lighthouses are striking totems of our relationship to the sea. For many, they encapsulate a romantic vision of solitary homes amongst the waves, but their original purpose was much more utilitarian than that. Today we still depend upon their guiding lights for the safe passage of ships. Nowhere is this truer than in the rock lighthouses of Great Britain and Ireland which form a ring of nineteen towers built between 1811 and 1905, so-called because they were constructed on desolate rock formations in the middle of the sea, and made of granite to withstand the power of its waves. Seashaken Houses is a lyrical exploration of these singular towers, the people who risked their lives building and rebuilding them, those that inhabited their circular rooms, and the ways in which we value emblems of our history in a changing world."--www.booktopia.com.

The Little Book of the Wild Atlantic Way

Author: Helen Lee

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 525

Did you know? Ireland’s only sea battle, the Battle of Tory Island, was fought off the Donegacoast in 1798. The first casualties of the 1916 Easter Risingwere three members of the Irish Volunteers who drowned at Caherciveen. The oldest known system of cultivated fields is the Céide Field on the Mayo coast. The inventor of the submarine, Tom Holland, was born in Liscannor, Co. Clare, in 1841. Known for its spectacular scenery, the Wild Atlantic Way winds its way over 2,600km, through nine counties, from Kinsale in Co. Cork to Muff in Co. Donegal. On its sandy beaches and towering cliffs you will find the history behind ancient burial sites and ruined abbeys, tales of shipwrecks and battles, and stories of saints and patriots. The Little Book of the Wild Atlantic Way is a miscellany of the history and legends of this famous coastline; a useful reference book and quirky guide whether you are travelling the entire route, or just touching on one part of Ireland’s Atlantic coast.

I Never Knew That About Wales

Author: Christopher Winn

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 208

View: 200

The inspiration for the primetime ITV series on Great Britain, this is a spellbinding journey around Wales by bestselling author Christopher Winn. Packed full of legends, firsts, birthplaces, inventions and adventures, I Never Knew That About Wales visits the thirteen traditional Welsh counties and unearths the hidden gems that they each hold. Discover where history and legends happened; where people, ideas and inventions began; where dreams took flight; where famous figures were born and now rest. A glittering pantheon of writers and artists, thinkers and inventors, heroes and villains have lived and toiled in this small country. Remarkable events, noble (and dastardly) deeds and exciting adventures have all taken place with Wales as their backdrop. This book seeks out their heritage, their monuments, their memories and their secrets. You'll be able to visit Britain's smallest city, St David's with its glorious 12th-century cathedral slumbering in a sleepy hollow near the sea. Explore Britain's greatest collection of castles from the first stone fortress at Chepstow to Britain's finest concentric castle at Beaumaris and the magnificent Caernarvon, birthplace of the first Prince of Wales. Browse through the second hand book capital of the world, Hay-on-Wye, wander the glorious Gower peninsula, Britain's first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Take a trip to Fishguard, where the last invasion of Britain took place in 1797. Marvel at Thomas Telford's Menai Bridge, the world's first iron suspension bridge or Pontcysyllte, the longest bridged aqueduct in Britain. This irresistible compendium of interesting facts and good stories will give you a captivating insight into the people, ideas and events that have shaped the individual identity of every place you visit, and will have you exclaiming again and again: 'Well, I never knew that!'

Guiding Lights

The Extraordinary Lives of Lighthouse Women

Author: Shona Riddell

Publisher: Exisle Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 211

Women have a long history of keeping the lights burning, from tending ancient altar flames or bonfires to modern-day lighthouse keeping. Yet most of their stories are little-known. Guiding Lights includes true stories from around the world, chronicling the lives of the extraordinary women who mind the world’s storm-battered towers. From Hannah Sutton and her partner Grant, the two caretakers living alone on Tasmania’s wild Maatsuyker Island, to Karen Zacharuk, the keeper in charge of Cape Beale on Canada’s Vancouver Island, where bears, cougars and wolves roam, the lives of lighthouse women are not for the faint of heart. Stunning photographs from throughout history accompany accounts of the dramatic torching of Puysegur Point, one of NZ’s most inhospitable lighthouses; ‘haunted’ lighthouses in across the US and their tragic tales; lighthouse accidents and emergencies around the world; and two of the world’s most legendary lighthouse women: Ida Lewis (US) and Grace Darling (UK), who risked their lives to save others. The book also explores our dual perception of lighthouses: are they comforting and romantic beacons symbolizing hope and trust, or storm-lashed and forbidding towers with echoes of lonely, mad keepers? Whatever our perception, stories of women’s courage and dedication in minding the lights — then and now — continue to capture our imagination and inspire.

Everyone Dies Famous in a Small Town

Author: Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 272

View: 836

The second, highly anticipated novel from Carnegie-shortlisted author Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock. Come on a journey across the rural American West . . . Meet the teenagers who live in the small towns across these states, separated by distance, but whose stories are woven together in the most unexpected of ways. Whether they are brought together by the spread of wildfire, by the priest who's moved from state to state or by the hunt for a missing child, these incredible tales blaze with secrets, rage and love. A novel like no other, this intricate, intense and beautiful book will take your breath away. 'A clever and unusual novel . . . powerful.' Sally Nicholls 'Gorgeous and compelling . . . breathtaking.' Katherine Webber 'A beautiful literary writer.' The Bookseller 'It's cut like a gemstone. Turn the pages, and facets gleam.' Hiliary McKay 'Beautifully observed and deeply satisfying.' Lisa Williamson 'Breathes life into wonderful, complex characters.' Lisa Heathfield 'A heartbreakingly brilliant tangle of teenage voices.' Judith Eagle

The Sea

Nature and Culture

Author: Richard Hamblyn

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 836

Sailing across time and geography, the imaginary and the real, The Sea chronicles the many physical and cultural meanings of the watery abyss. This book explores the sea and its meanings from ancient myths to contemporary geopolitics, from Atlantis to the Mediterranean migrant crisis. Richard Hamblyn traces a cultural and geographical journey from estuary to abyss, beginning with the topographies of the shoreline and ending with the likely futures of our maritime environments. Along the way he considers the sea as a site of work and endurance; of story and song; of language, leisure, and longing. By meditating on the sea as both a physical and a cultural presence, the book shines new light on the sea and its indelible place in the human imagination.

The Unremembered Places

Exploring Scotland's Wild Histories

Author: Patrick Baker

Publisher: Birlinn Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 224

View: 476

There are strange relics hidden across Scotland’s landscape: forgotten places that are touchstones to incredible stories and past lives which still resonate today. Yet why are so many of these ‘wild histories’ unnoticed and overlooked? And what can they tell us about our own modern identity? From the high mountain passes of an ancient droving route to a desolate moorland graveyard, from uninhabited postindustrial islands and Clearance villages to caves explored by early climbers and the mysterious strongholds of Christian missionaries, Patrick Baker makes a series of journeys on foot and by paddle. Along the way, he encounters Neolithic settlements, bizarre World War Two structures, evidence of illicit whisky production, sacred wells and Viking burial grounds. Combining a rich fusion of travelogue and historical narrative, he threads themes of geology, natural and social history, literature, and industry from the places he visits, discovering connections between people and place more powerful than can be imagined.

The Three Lives of Dylan Thomas

Author: Hilly Janes

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 923

Dylan Thomas was one of the most extraordinary poetic talents of the twentieth century. Poems such as 'Do not go gentle into that good night' regularly top polls of the nation's favourites and his much-loved play Under Milk Wood has never been out of print. Thomas lived a life that was rarely without incident and died a death that has gone down in legend as the epitome of Bohemian dissoluteness. In The Three Lives of Dylan Thomas, journalist Hilly Janes explores that life and its extraordinary legacy through the eyes of her father, the artist Alfred Janes, who was a member of Thomas's inner circle and painted the poet at three key moments: in 1934, 1953 and, posthumously, 1964. Using these portraits as focal points, and drawing on a personal archive that includes drawings, diaries, letters and new interviews with omas's friends and descendants, The Three Lives of Dylan Thomas plots the poet's tempestuous journey from his birthplace in Swansea to his early death in a New York hospital in 1953. In this innovative and powerful narrative, Hilly Janes paints her own portrait: one that ventures beneath Thomas's reputation as a feckless, disloyal, boozy Welsh bard to reveal a much more complex character.

A Dylan Thomas Companion

Life, Poetry and Prose

Author: John Ackerman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 325

View: 404

Opening with Thomas's life, the book offers vignettes of Swansea in the 1920s and 1930s, pre- and post-war Laugharne and rural West Wales, wartime London and New York City in the early 1950s, seen through the poet's eyes. Thomas's political views are focused on, as well as his social attitudes.

Coming into the End Zone

A Memoir

Author: Doris Grumbach

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 303

A New York Times Notable Book: One woman’s search for the value of a long life With the advent of her seventieth birthday, many changes have beset Doris Grumbach: the rapidly accelerating speed of the world around her, the premature deaths of her younger friends, her own increasing infirmities, and her move from cosmopolitan Washington, DC, to the calm of the Maine coast. Coming into the End Zone is an account of everything Grumbach observes over the course of a year. Astute observations and vivid memories of quotidian events pepper her story, which surprises even her with its fullness and vigor. Coming into the End Zone captures the days of a woman entering a new stage of life with humanity and abiding hope.

Where the Tigers Were

Travels Through Literary Landscapes

Author: Don Meredith

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 201

View: 841

From Venice to Vietnam, from the Welsh coast to Cairo, Don Meredith has travelled in the wake of 20th-century writers, using their novels and poems as guides, as another wayfarer might turn to Fodor's or the Guide Bleu. Canvassing the works of authors especially attuned to a sense of place, the author has gone in search of the backstreets, basilicas, cafes, piazzas and countrysides that figured so powerfully in their writings. Part travelogue, part literary study, this text is the author's account of these explorations into the impact of place in 12 literary classics.

Welsh Lives - Gone but Not Forgotten

Author: Meic Stephens

Publisher: Y Lolfa

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 277

View: 894

A collection of obituaries of eminent Welsh people, first published in The Independent newspaper. Amongst those included are: Stuart Cable, Huw Ceredig, Hywel Teifi Edwards, Owen Edwards, Iris Gower, Ray Gravell, W. J. Gruffydd, J. Geraint Jenkins, Margaret John, T. Llew Jones, Philip Madoc, Eluned Phillips, Aeronwy Thomas, Orig Williams and Stewart Williams.

The Dragon Has Two Tongues

Essays on Anglo-Welsh Writers and Writing

Author: Glyn Jones

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 384

First published in 1968, The Dragon Has Two Tongues was the first book-length study of the English-language literature of Wales. Glyn Jones (1905–95) was one of Wales’s major English-language writers of fiction and poetry, and the book includes chapters dealing with the work of Dylan Thomas, Caradoc Evans, Jack Jones, Gwyn Thomas and Idris Davies, all of whom the author knew personally. This first-hand knowledge of the writers, coupled with the shrewdness of Glyn Jones’s critical comments, established The Dragon Has Two Tongues as a classic and invaluable study of this generation of Welsh writers. It also contains Glyn Jones’s own autobiographical reflections on his life and literary career, his loss and rediscovery of the Welsh language, and the cultural shifts that resulted in the emergence of a distinctive English-language literature in Wales in the early decades of the twentieth century. This edition of The Dragon Has Two Tongues was edited by Tony Brown, who discussed the book with Glyn Jones before his death in 1995 with unique access to the author’s proposed revisions and manuscript drafts, and it was first published by the University of Wales Press in 2001.

The Little Book of Carmarthenshire

Author: Russell Grigg

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 335

Fast-paced and fact-packed, this compendium revels in the history, places and people of Wales’ largest county. Carmarthenshire’s rich heritage is explored within, including sport, industry, religion, education and the arts. This whistle-stop tour through the ‘Garden of Wales’ covers both celebrated characters and murky pasts, taking in the county’s breathtaking castles, nature reserves and famous landmarks along the way. From the county gaol and asylum to school strikes and industrial riots, this is a book you won’t want to put down.

Falcons and Foxes in the U.K.

The Making of a Hunter

Author: A. Lee Chichester

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 284

View: 966

A once-in-a-lifetime experience chronicled with humor and passion, this memoir details the life-altering 1995 summer during which a nature-lover becomes a hunter. One of those rare quantities, a woman falconer, Chichester discovered that her outlook on the world, nature, and herself changed radically during her pursuit of the ancient art in a foreign country. Training captive-bred, hybrid falcons; riding horseback to the flight of a falcon in pursuit of a crow, belting across the fells and pastures of the United Kingdom; the author deals with fears, preconceptions, and a very steep learning curve, after which she is changed forever.

The Poetry of Dylan Thomas

Under the Spelling Wall

Author: John Goodby

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 512

View: 337

Published in anticipation of the centenary of the poet's birth, The Poetry of Dylan Thomas is the first study of poet to show how his work may be read in terms of contemporary critical concerns, using theories of modernism, the body, gender, the carnivalesque, language, hybridity and the pastoral in order to view it in an original light. Moreover, in presenting a Dylan Thomas who has real significance for twenty-first century readers, it shows that such a reappraisal also requires us to re-think some of the ways in which all post-Waste Land British poetry has been read in the last few decades.

Dylan Thomas

A Centenary Celebration

Author: Hannah Ellis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 198

Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration is a unique collection of specially commissioned essays celebrating the poet's life and work one hundred years after his birth in 1914. Edited by his granddaughter, Hannah Ellis, who introduces each section by theme, the book is divided into three parts concerning Thomas's early years, later life and his lasting legacy. Highlights include essays from noted biographers Andrew Lycett and David N. Thomas, National Poet for Wales Gillian Clarke on Under Milk Wood, and poetry by Archbishop Emeritus Rowan Williams. The book also includes essays by poet Owen Sheers and BBC Radio 6 presenter Cerys Matthews, as well as numerous testimonies and poems from the likes of former President of the United States Jimmy Carter, Phillip Pullman and actor Michael Sheen. With a foreword by comedian and former Monty Python Terry Jones, Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration is a rich and personal reflection on the lasting legacy of Britain's greatest poet.

I Never Knew That About Britain: The Quiz Book

Over 1000 questions and answers about our glorious isles

Author: Christopher Winn

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 215

Bestselling author and quiz master Christopher Winn is here to test your general knowledge of Britain with over 1000 quiz questions to perplex and puzzle about our glorious islands. Covering a myriad of subjects including history, cathedrals, sports, records, modern Britain, royalty, people, places, deeds, discoveries and disasters, there is something to test everyone from Britain's brainiest boffins to the quiz beginner. Featuring a range of questions from multiple choice teasers and odd ones out to picture quizzes illustrated with charming line drawings to test your knowledge of the famous faces and facades of Britain. Alongside these sit cryptic and puzzle quizzes plus special features spotlighting different regions so you can see just how well you know your local area. Perfect for all ages, this quiz book will provide hours of entertainment and education for the whole family and have you proclaiming: 'I bet you never knew that!'

Writers and Their Houses

A Guide to the Writers' Houses of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland : Essays by Modern Writers

Author: Kate Marsh

Publisher: H. Hamilton

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 514

View: 608

Shows and describes the homes and birthplaces of British writers