Scientific American

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 322

Monthly magazine devoted to topics of general scientific interest.

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and Our Own Minds are Stimulating and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 215

This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you'll explore: How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are helping the deaf hear, the blind see, and the paralyzed communicate. How our brains can repair and improve themselves, erase traumatic memories How we can stay mentally alert longer—and how we may be able to halt or even reverse Alzheimers How we can control technology with brain waves, including prosthetic devices, machinery, computers—and even spaceships or clones. Insights into how science may cure fatal diseases, and improve our intellectual and physical productivity Judith Horstman presents a highly informative and entertaining look at the future of your brain, based on articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, and the work of today’s visionary neuroscientists.

The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex and the Brain

The Neuroscience of How, When, Why and Who We Love

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 151

Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery, or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-old questions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstman takes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organ and the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from the bonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, the affectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in our lives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how we are born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship of others, and how very badly things can go without love. Among the findings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm make it healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although the craving for romantic love can be described as an addiction, friendship may actually be the most important loving relationship of your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigious Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, and the Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controls our loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep and basic need for connection.

Scientific American The Amateur Astronomer

Author: Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 934

From the longest running column in Scientific American's history comes this collection of fascinating projects for amateur astronomers For over seventy years, "The Amateur Scientist" column in Scientific American has helped people explore their world and make original discoveries. This collection of both classic and recent articles presents projects for amateur astronomers at all levels. Hands-on astronomy fans will find how to build inexpensive astronomical instruments using ordinary shop-tools. From making a telescope to predicting satellite orbits to detecting the chemical composition of faraway stars, this book has something for everyone interested in practical astronomy.

The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain

A 24 hour Journal of What's Happening in Your Brain as you Sleep, Dream, Wake Up, Eat, Work, Play, Fight, Love, Worry, Compete, Hope, Make Important Decisions, Age and Change

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 912

Have you ever wondered what’s happening in your brain as you go through a typical day and night? This fascinating book presents an hour-by-hour round-the-clock journal of your brain’s activities. Drawing on the treasure trove of information from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines as well as original material written specifically for this book, Judith Horstman weaves together a compelling description of your brain at work and at play. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain reveals what’s going on in there while you sleep and dream, how your brain makes memories and forms addictions and why we sometimes make bad decisions. The book also offers intriguing information about your emotional brain, and what’s happening when you’re feeling love, lust, fear and anxiety—and how sex, drugs and rock and roll tickle the same spots. Based on the latest scientific information, the book explores your brain’s remarkable ability to change, how your brain can make new neurons even into old age and why multitasking may be bad for you. Your brain is uniquely yours – but research is showing many of its day-to-day cycles are universal. This book gives you a look inside your brain and some insights into why you may feel and act as you do. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain is written in the entertaining, informative and easy-to-understand style that fans of Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazine have come to expect.

AARP The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain

The Neuroscience of Making the Most of Your Mature Mind

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 839

AARP Digital Editions offer you practical tips, provensolutions, and expert guidance. ScientificAmerican and Scientific AmericanMind have good news about getting older! AARP The Scientific American Healthy AgingBrain taps into the most current research to present arealistic and encouraging view of the well-aged brain, a soberinglook at what can go wrong––and at what might help youand your brain stay healthy longer. Neurologists and psychologistshave discovered the aging brain is much more elastic and supplethan previously thought, and that happiness actually increases withage. While our short-term memory may not be what it was, dementiais not inevitable. Far from disintegrating, the elder brain cancontinue to develop and adapt in many ways and stay sharp as itages. Offers new insights on how an aging brain can repair itself,and the five best strategies for keeping your brain healthy Shows how older brains can acquire new skills, perspective, andproductivity Dispels negative myths about aging Explores what to expect as our brains grow older With hope and truth, this book helps us preserve whatwe’ve got, minimize what we’ve lost, and optimize thevigor and health of our maturing brains.

Lights Out

How It All Ends

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 100

View: 553

Lights Out: How It All Ends by the editors of Scientific American Traditionally, the four horsemen of the apocalypse are war, famine, plague and death; but while classical authors were familiar with only four horsemen, modern ones could add events such as environmental devastation and nearby supernovas. In this eBook we look at several "end of the world" scenarios – or at least, things that could make human life really difficult. Each section discusses a different horseman, from plague, famine and war to cosmic events, extreme weather and environmental collapse. Some are apocalyptic, others less so, but they show that even if one doesn't take the Book of Revelation or the supposed Mayan prophecy as a template, thinking about our own end is fascinating – and sobering. Some endings only affect humans – mass starvation for us isn't likely to bother rats – whereas others eliminate all life on Earth. The good news is that the ability to map out the end also grants us the power to avert it, at least in some cases. Included in this book is a seminal piece outlining the possibility of "nuclear winter." Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev has stated that such studies were a major impetus for him to seek to reduce tensions with the United States. As a species we've tackled ozone depletion, and there's no reason other environmental problems can't be dealt with as well. The question was never technical ability, only political will. So while much of this book might seem a gloomy exercise, there's an optimistic side too: we may not endure eternally, but stupidity or hubris doesn't have to end our world prematurely.

Scientific American Cyclopedia of Formulas

Partly Based Upon the 28th Ed. of Scientific American Cylopedia of Receipts, Notes and Queries

Author: Albert Allis Hopkins

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Formulas, recipes, etc

Page: 1077

View: 225

Scientific American Inventions from Outer Space

Everyday Uses for NASA Technology

Author: David Baker

Publisher: Random House Reference

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 128

View: 841

Scientific American profiles more than sixty inventions that were developed for the space program but now enjoy everyday usage, such as the Dustbuster vacuum, the CAT scan, and the home water filter.