Scientific American

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Category: Science

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Monthly magazine devoted to topics of general scientific interest.

The Higgs Boson

Searching for the God Particle

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 231

View: 386

The Higgs Boson: Searching for the God Particle by the Editors of Scientific American Updated 2017 Edition! For the fifth anniversary of one of the biggest discoveries in physics, we’ve updated this eBook to include our continuing analysis of the discovery, of the questions it answers and those it raises. As the old adage goes, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there is effect, there must be cause. The planet Neptune was found in 1846 because the mathematics of Newton's laws, when applied to the orbit of Uranus, said some massive body had to be there. Astronomers eventually found it, using the best telescopes available to peer into the sky. This same logic is applied to the search for the Higgs boson. One consequence of the prevailing theory of physics, called the Standard Model, is that there has to be some field that gives particles their particular masses. With that there has to be a corresponding particle, made by creating waves in the field, and this is the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle. This eBook chronicles the search – and demonstrates the power of a good theory. Based on the Standard Model, physicists believed something had to be there, but it wasn't until the Large Hadron Collider was built that anyone could see evidence of the Higgs – and finally in July 2012, they did. A Higgs-like particle was found near the energies scientists expected to find it. Now, armed with better evidence and better questions, the scientific process continues. This eBook gathers the best reporting and analysis from Scientific American to explain that process – the theories, the search, the ongoing questions. In essence, everything you need to know to separate Higgs from hype.

Scientific American The Amateur Astronomer

Author: Scientific American

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 288

From the longest running column in Scientific American's history comes this collection of fascinating projects for amateur astronomers For over seventy years, "The Amateur Scientist" column in Scientific American has helped people explore their world and make original discoveries. This collection of both classic and recent articles presents projects for amateur astronomers at all levels. Hands-on astronomy fans will find how to build inexpensive astronomical instruments using ordinary shop-tools. From making a telescope to predicting satellite orbits to detecting the chemical composition of faraway stars, this book has something for everyone interested in practical astronomy.

Beyond Extreme Physics

Author: Scientific American

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 221

Collection of articles examining some of the latest work in the understanding of physics, including black holes and string theory.

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and Our Own Minds are Stimulating and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 369

This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you'll explore: How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are helping the deaf hear, the blind see, and the paralyzed communicate. How our brains can repair and improve themselves, erase traumatic memories How we can stay mentally alert longer—and how we may be able to halt or even reverse Alzheimers How we can control technology with brain waves, including prosthetic devices, machinery, computers—and even spaceships or clones. Insights into how science may cure fatal diseases, and improve our intellectual and physical productivity Judith Horstman presents a highly informative and entertaining look at the future of your brain, based on articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, and the work of today’s visionary neuroscientists.

AARP The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain

The Neuroscience of Making the Most of Your Mature Mind

Author: Judith Horstman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 347

AARP Digital Editions offer you practical tips, provensolutions, and expert guidance. ScientificAmerican and Scientific AmericanMind have good news about getting older! AARP The Scientific American Healthy AgingBrain taps into the most current research to present arealistic and encouraging view of the well-aged brain, a soberinglook at what can go wrong––and at what might help youand your brain stay healthy longer. Neurologists and psychologistshave discovered the aging brain is much more elastic and supplethan previously thought, and that happiness actually increases withage. While our short-term memory may not be what it was, dementiais not inevitable. Far from disintegrating, the elder brain cancontinue to develop and adapt in many ways and stay sharp as itages. Offers new insights on how an aging brain can repair itself,and the five best strategies for keeping your brain healthy Shows how older brains can acquire new skills, perspective, andproductivity Dispels negative myths about aging Explores what to expect as our brains grow older With hope and truth, this book helps us preserve whatwe’ve got, minimize what we’ve lost, and optimize thevigor and health of our maturing brains.

Ultimate Physics

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 170

View: 147

The fundamental outlines of the physical world, from its tiniest particles to massive galaxy clusters, have been apparent for decades. Does this mean physicists are about to tie it all up into a neat package? Not at all. Just when you think you’re figuring it out, the universe begins to look its strangest. This eBook, “Ultimate Physics: From Quarks to the Cosmos,” illustrates clearly how answers often lead to more questions and open up new paths to insight. We open with “The Higgs at Last,” which looks behind the scenes of one of the most anticipated discoveries in physics and examines how this “Higgs-like” particle both confirmed and confounded expectations. In “The Inner Life of Quarks,” author Don Lincoln discusses evidence that quarks and leptons may not be the smallest building blocks of matter. Section Two switches from the smallest to the largest of scales, and in “Origin of the Universe,” Michael Turner analyzes a number of speculative scenarios about how it all began. Another two articles examine the mystery of dark energy and some doubts as to whether it exists at all. In the last section, we look at one of the most compelling problems in physics: how to tie together the very small and the very large – quantum mechanics and general relativity. In one article, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow argue that a so-called “theory of everything” may be out of reach, and in another, David Deutsch and Artur Ekert question the view that quantum mechanics imposes limits on knowledge, arguing instead that the theory has an intricacy that allows for new, practical technologies, including powerful computers that can reach their true potential.

Scientific American's Ask the Experts

Answers to The Most Puzzling and Mind-Blowing Science Questions

Author: Editors of Scientific American

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 940

Why is the night sky dark? How do dolphins sleep without drowning? Why do hangovers occur? Will time travel ever be a reality? What makes a knuckleball appear to flutter? Why are craters always round? There's only one source to turn to for the answers to the most puzzling and thought-provoking questions about the world of science: Scientific American. Writing in a fun and accessible style, an esteemed team of scientists and educators will lead you on a wild ride from the far reaches of the universe to the natural world right in your own backyard. Along the way, you'll discover solutions to some of life's quirkiest conundrums, such as why cats purr, how frogs survive winter without freezing, why snowflakes are symmetrical, and much more. Even if you haven't picked up a science book since your school days, these tantalizing Q & A's will shed new light on the world around you, inside you, below you, above you, and beyond!

Martin Gardner

The Magic and Mystery of Numbers

Author: Scientific American Editors

Publisher: Scientific American

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 161

View: 144

How many people achieve a cult following because of their writing in mathematics? Only a handful, and Martin Gardner is among the most well known and well loved. Not only did he present a notoriously difficult subject in an engaging and accessible way, but in doing so, he attracted an incredibly broad readership. His correspondents ranged from academics like Roger Penrose and John Horton Conway to artists MC Escher and Salvador Dali to writer Isaac Asimov. His "Mathematical Games" column in Scientific American ran nearly every month for 26 years and was one of the most popular in the magazine's history. Gardner would have celebrated his 100th birthday this October, and to mark the occasion we've created this eBook collection, Martin Gardner: The Magic and Mystery of Numbers. In this anthology, we strove to create a new "slice" through his wealth of material. Here, we focus on all flavors of number, from common integers and negative numbers to figurate numbers and the exotic random number, Omega, which can be described but not computed. Some of these columns are less well known than, say, his writings about flexagons, but they are no less fun. In true Gardner fashion, they leap from magic and games—as well as art, music, and literature—to flashes of deep mathematical insight. Lattice integers become a billiards challenge and surreal numbers spawn a host of related games. The "abracadabric number e," quoting French entomologist Jean-Henri Fabre, leads to spiders' webs and compounded interest. The binary Gray code inspires a poem and cracks the classic Chinese Rings puzzle. And binary numbers unlock mind-reading tricks and the Tower of Hanoi. Almost every column offers up problems for readers to solve and test their understanding—along with the answers for anyone easily frustrated. We hope that they will prove as inspirational to readers now as they did to earlier audiences.